The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / History  % width posts: 369

Do Polish people in general dislike Russia or Germany more?


Vlad1234 16 | 754
27 Oct 2020 #331
the same can be said about poles doing bad things to Russians and Germans in the past.

Poles caused some unmotivated cruelties to Germans? When it happened?

Stalin had launched a invasion on Poland and executed 22 thousand Polish officers at Katyn

This is very sad, of course, but it happened more than 80 years ago...
Crow 146 | 9,112
28 Oct 2020 #332
Germany? What Germany?
Mr Grunwald 29 | 2,014
29 Oct 2020 #333
@Vlad1234
I can only guess, about Possible victory in 1410 against Teutonic Order, Polish king accepting Protestantism in Prussia.

Germans had a lot of grudges thanks to Hohenzollern family for connecting themselves to Teutonic order and Prussia. Adopting their conflicts and ambitions to HRE business and opening up for conflict with Sweden which started a new tactic of razing towns and villages during the religious wars in HRE... Which then "Lisowczycy" scouts adopted and used in Russia during times of troubles if I am not mistaken.

Swedes making a mess and pushing their nose where they shouldn't just so they can be pro-active before a possible attack. Just like Japan during ww2.

Otherwise, what reason other then political expansion is there for conflict between Germans vs Poles or Poles vs Russians?

*silly me*
Of course, Polish food and women
Just don't share this with everyone ok? Most people aren't able to handle it long term without getting addicted
Vlad1234 16 | 754
1 Nov 2020 #334
I think Belarus is closer to Russia culturally than to Poland.
dolnoslask 6 | 3,541
2 Nov 2020 #335
What on earth are you two on about?

That's the point , your comments are the norm for many guys and they don't see the problem, don't take what I said too personally, but do think about it.
gumishu 11 | 5,603
2 Nov 2020 #336
Lisowczycy started out before the 30 years war and so did their 'tactics'
tesco
2 Nov 2020 #338
This is very sad, of course, but it happened more than 80 years ago...

Don't think you will ever be forgiven for it.
Mr Grunwald 29 | 2,014
2 Nov 2020 #339
@tesco
Last time I checked Vlad1234 wasn't a self proclaimed communist or old enough to be an active perpetrator from 1940
Vlad1234 16 | 754
2 Nov 2020 #340
Last time I checked Vlad1234 wasn't a self proclaimed communist

I don't understand which relation does my personality have in this context. I just wanted to point out that both invasions of Nazi Germany and USSR of Poland had happened more than 80 years ago. And what difference does it make if some person is a communist or not if he doesn't want to force anyone to live under communism?
Dirk diggler 9 | 4,721
2 Nov 2020 #341
Germans and Russians are both historic rivals for Poland - and it's like that even today. Difference is that Poles and Germans despite German aggression coming up every so often managed to somehow have an uneasy co-existence. It's not like that with Poles and Russians. A lot of Russians would still love for Poland to be a Soviet vassal. With Germans it's more geo-political and increasingly economic rivalry. Poland's clout is increasing while Germany's is still strong, but stagnant.

I've worked with just almost every nationality and I can say that the Germans are by far the most stuck-up and make way too many assumptions but they're also the most diligent and most competitive, even more so than E Asians and Indians.
Vlad1234 16 | 754
2 Nov 2020 #342
A lot of Russians would still love for Poland to be a Soviet vassal.

That is a shocking discovery...
Vlad1234 16 | 754
3 Nov 2020 #343
I've worked with just almost every nationality

What do you think about Russians or Ukrainians?
pawian 176 | 14,299
3 Nov 2020 #344
They are good people but too easily duped (Ukrainians) or intimidated (Russians) by their rulers.
Vlad1234 16 | 754
3 Nov 2020 #345
This is a helpful info, but I asked about their working qualities...
pawian 176 | 14,299
3 Nov 2020 #346
You asked a general question which didn`t specify you meant working qualities. Ukrainians who come to Poland are mostly good workers, appreciated by employers. I don`t know about Russians.
mafketis 24 | 9,366
3 Nov 2020 #347
Ukrainians who come to Poland are mostly good workers

I have the idea that Ukrainians are a bit like Poles. I remember at point in the early 1990s thinking that Polish people don't have much of a work ethic, and over time I realized that was a simplification. They didn't have much of a work ethic in Poland working for normal Polish wages (a person who worked really hard for such low wages would be a saint or a sucker) but abroad and/or at home when paid well they would work very hard.

Ukrainians are paid more in Poland than in Ukraine and so they work better than they might in Ukraine for Ukrainian wages and their presence was a boon to the economy before covid...
Dirk diggler 9 | 4,721
3 Nov 2020 #348
What do you think about Russians or Ukrainians?

I work with a lot of Ukrainians but not too many Russians. Most the Ukrainians I've dealt with are pretty capable but from my experience don't do too well with a high level of autonomy and need to be guided along. They're not really the kind of people where you can give them general guidelines or tell them to do something and expect a good result - you have to hold their hand and walk them through it. The engineers and programmers are very capable and hard working, but the sales, marketing, social media, etc. tend to be par at best.
Michel88
4 Nov 2020 #349
Where's Bratwurst Boy when you need him? BB, how would you compare Poles to Germans? And are Thuringians similar to your people (Saxonians)?
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,632
5 Nov 2020 #350
Ich bin ein Pfannkuchen! :)

Poles are essentially Germans...only more religious I think....most Germans (especially East Germans) are not. I generally think East Germans have alot more in common with western Poles than with many West Germans...decades behind the Iron Curtain, sharing the same fate, can do that to people...

The divide in Germany is mostly between the North (prussian, protestant) and the South (catholic, not prussian:) and recently between East and West....Bavarians are alot closer to Austrians for example than to Saxons or Thuringians...

"The Germans" don't exist and I think there are no "The Poles" either...
Spike31 2 | 2,107
5 Nov 2020 #351
Poles are essentially Germans...only more religious I think

I would say it's the other way around

"Polabian Slavs is a collective term applied to a number of Lechitic (West Slavic) tribes who lived along the Elbe river in what is today Eastern Germany. (...)

The Polabian Slavs started settling in the territory of modern Germany in the 6th century. They were largely conquered by Saxons and Danes since the 9th century and were subsequently included and gradually assimilated within the Holy Roman Empire."

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polabian_Slavs

Your heart is pumping Slavonic blood into your Germanized head @BratwurstBoy :-)
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,632
5 Nov 2020 #352
It doesn't stop you from hating all things German....shows the stupidity of that!
Mr Grunwald 29 | 2,014
5 Nov 2020 #353
@BB
Poles don't hate German, just what being German can potentially lead to. So there is a need for distance, which is why there is still a border.

Germany has come a long way from being authoritarian, which is a huge step in the right direction to improve relations.
Spike31 2 | 2,107
5 Nov 2020 #354
Poles don't hate German, just what being German can potentially lead to.

Exactly. I'm not hating the people per se but I'm rather being put off by their national collective mindset which often turns virtues into vices. There are plenty of Polish [Polonized] Germans which I like and respect, starting with Slawomir Mentzen from Konfederacja down to an actor Tomasz Schuchardt.

I think Germans gain many new positive values in the act of Polonization (and keeping some of their distinctive mental features at the same time).
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,632
5 Nov 2020 #355
...put off by their national collective mindset....

....all Poles! :)
Ziemowit 13 | 4,277
5 Nov 2020 #356
East Germans have alot more in common with western Poles than with many West Germans

I concur, there is something quite "different" about a Wessi as compared to an Ossi. I myself feel much more affinity to East Germans than to West Germans.

Wasn't it Graffin Doenhoff of East Prussia who once said she felt more at home in Poland than in West Germany? All because of a striking similarity in mentality and emotions between people of East Prussia, East Germany and Poland?
Crow 146 | 9,112
5 Nov 2020 #357
East Germans have alot more in common with western Poles than with many West Germans

True.
pawian 176 | 14,299
8 Nov 2020 #358
there is something quite "different" about a Wessi as compared to an Ossi.

I read that the neo-Nazi party is much more popular in ex-communist East Germany than in the West One. 20%?

aljazeera.com/opinions/2018/9/29/how-east-germany-became-a-stronghold-of-the-far-right/
Mr Grunwald 29 | 2,014
8 Nov 2020 #359
@pawian
Cause Wessi's had a hunt and political dogfight inwards towards Anyone with Nazi ties to the ww2 regime, while in Ossis had to accept anyone to gain as many possible members in to the Party while maintaining an authoritarian rule and mindset, the collective thinking of placing loyalty to a party above all else is strikingly identical in totalitarian ideologies. So an Ossi, basically only changed color from black-white-red to basically just red. While an Wessi had to undergo distancing from family/friends/political parties tied with Nazi connections.

I haven't heard about any "washing" in eastern Germany yet, which would explain weird affiliations popping up from time to time.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 10,632
8 Nov 2020 #360
Cause Wessi's had a hunt and political dogfight inwards towards Anyone with Nazi ties to the ww2 regime

What makes you think that?

spiegel.de/international/germany/from-dictatorship-to-democracy-the-role-ex-nazis-played-in-early-west-germany-a-810207.html

businessinsider.com/former-nazi-officials-in-germany-post-world-war-ii-government-2016-10?r=DE&IR=T

There was no HIAG in East Germany, there was definitely no Vertriebenen-Verband in East Germany etc., etc., etc.,....the old Nazis in the GDR were now all in the SED... the torch marches, the uniforms, the oath to the destroy their "enemies" were not that different after all...and the mindset was the same!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HIAG

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Federation_of_Expellees

What you are probably thinking of came a generation later, as the old Nazis retired and died off...as their children and grandchildren startet to get interested, as it was safe to do so because that history became far removed, physically and psychologically.

For example the first real exposure to the horrors of the holocaust happend for most Germans not in school or some "denazification" measure by the occupying forces but some TV mini-series aptly named "Holocaust"...in 1978.

I read that was the moment as many younger Germans started as questioning their elders...that started a flood of articles, books and more movies....but before that? Not much...and that was about the Jews!

My own exposure to WWII happened in school, a former inmate of Ravensbrück told us schoolchildren from the horrors of the camps, we visited Buchenwald...our heroes were communists like Thälmann and our soviet communist liberators...Jews not so much.


Home / History / Do Polish people in general dislike Russia or Germany more?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.