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Do you think that Polish people are rude?


iwona 12 | 542
21 Jan 2007  #1
In our language we don't use so often please, thank you.....How are you...How are you doing .....But this is just language.

I am in general polite person but sometimes when i answer phone at work and someone says hello, Are you all right ....I don't like it. Hello, Good morning is needed and polite but later I usually go straight to the point.

I really don't like it "are you all right".....What is the point of it? This person doesn't know me personally and is not interested if I am "all right" or not.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
21 Jan 2007  #2
LOL, I know what you mean some people are over familiar, I think its just an icebreaker...

I dont think Polish people are rude, not in the slightest I have always found them polite.
Lee_England
21 Jan 2007  #3
We would normally say hello, and "hows things?" "hows your day?" "busy?" it's just a way of establishing a rapport with someone. Usually you would only do this with friends but in certain instances you can use it in more official communication, it depends on the person your talking to.

It's just small talk, if you engage in it, the person your talking to will feel more comfortable. I've often phoned up banks, mobile phone companies and ended up having pointless conversations with the operators about the weather or if the world cup is on, the football. People like to talk about current events in England.
Eurola 4 | 1,906
21 Jan 2007  #4
"hows things?" "hows your day?" "busy?"

How are you? How are you doing?, the above questions and other variety of them are a big part of the English language and culture. They are great ice breakers and , not asking is considered rude, like there is something missing...Yes, it is somewhat meaningless between strangers, but I'm yet to meet someone who resented it. :)

It's just a part of the culture and works great.

It is definitely different than in Poland. I grew up without asking this type of questions, so I can understand Iwona's frustration." How are you" question was reserved for friends or family members, I did not see for months or years. When, you asked, you really wanted to know and they were happy to tell you all that happened since the last time. Very warm.

It would be nice to know how it works in all other languages and cultures. Anybody?
miranda
21 Jan 2007  #5
Polish people are definately more direct...sometimes it hurts and it could be preceived by other nationalities as rude.
LoneStranger
21 Jan 2007  #6
not all are so direct... it depends from people to people...
Wroclaw 44 | 5,389
21 Jan 2007  #7
Polish people could use the phrase 'excuse me' a bit more often.
Thiaren - | 3
21 Jan 2007  #8
Well... It's sad, but true... Many poles just aren't polite, thank god for that other part... :)
Eurola 4 | 1,906
21 Jan 2007  #9
Polish people could use the phrase 'excuse me' a bit more often.

I agree, besides they would call when they say will call, they will write when they say will write, they will take care of an issue when they say they will etc.

And, they are the members of my family!!! My two polish friends are even worse, but I'm used to it...my expectations are low and I know they need to be reminded and they will do it at their sweet convenience.

Therefore, I really prefer to work with american people and I really like my american friends.
LoneStranger
21 Jan 2007  #10
I disagree that Polish ppl are not that Polite... I disagree :)
Eurola 4 | 1,906
21 Jan 2007  #11
Yes, not all as bad as my family whom I love anyway. :)

Most polish people are really nice, very helpful and very gracious.
Sparky - | 92
21 Jan 2007  #12
really don't like it "are you all right".....What is the point of it?

I agree this is stupid. People get in the habit of using the same phrases all the time. and they forget to think about if it is the right phrase to use at the moment.
Guest
21 Jan 2007  #13
Polish people are more direct, I have worked in offices where the girls answering the phone would always complain and call someone rude or other names if they were what they called "short" with them, they would then put the person through to me (I worked in 2nd and 3rd line IT support) and I would get on with the person just fine, I did not think them rude at all, as I am also very direct.

i am happy to exchange plesantries with people but it's annoying when sales people ring you up and ask about your day, you know they don't really care they just want to soften you up to make a sale. As well as direct I am very honest and I cannot pretend to be nice when I know someone is not being honest with me.

Polish people also raise their voices slightly when they talk, it is not rude or angry, just normal talking. But when I do it in the UK it is perceived as shouting by some people.

Maybe I should have stayed in Poland, but then I had no choice in coming over here because I came over here as a child/dependant and spent the majority of my life here.

So I understand the British culture/people perfectly and why they do or say certain things and at the same time my Polish side is still there.
OP iwona 12 | 542
22 Jan 2007  #14
On more thing I noticed.

Ok polish people are shorter with please,...how are you.....but When I phone someone I always introduce myself- I did it in Poland adn I do it in Engand.

WHY PEOPLE IN ENGLAND DON'T DO IT????????.

Customer phones and says...helo...Do you want my account number.....but Who are you?
The same people from our branches or differetn institutions.Soemtimes they do soentimes they don't.
I can understand they want to get to the point but....I find it little rude.
The same I answer my colleague phone and soemone askss...is it .( Anne , Sam)...there but who are you?

Guest, I know what you mean.

We have some phonecalls from Spain, Gibraltar...They are direct, bit loud- I don't find them rude at all but some English people do.
brit
22 Jan 2007  #15
I can understand they want to get to the point but....I find it little rude

You always are so critical of people living in GB. why don't you pack your bags and return to your beloved Poland...Ivona you must walk around with a broom stuck up your backside...I am the best, I am the best, you are SH.T
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544
22 Jan 2007  #16
I agree this is stupid.

Well, the idea was good though.
OP iwona 12 | 542
22 Jan 2007  #17
You always are so critical of people living in GB. why don't you pack your bags and return to your beloved Poland...Ivona you must walk around with a broom stuck up your backside...I am the best, I am the best, you are SH.T

COMPLETELY NOT TRUE
shakeNbake07
22 Jan 2007  #18
I think we're nice
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
22 Jan 2007  #19
Ivona you must walk around with a broom stuck up your backside...

I think that is totally unfair, Iwona askes in a positive way, she is not having a dig, she is merely showing cultural differences and asking the reasons behind it, one thing I do find the most irritating is when people spell others names incorrectly! Iwona...not Ivona...
globetrotter 3 | 106
22 Jan 2007  #20
We do things differently - that's all. I found some things too direct when in Poland and I can understand why Iwona and others find our approach a little strange.

We have some phonecalls from Spain, Gibraltar...They are direct, bit loud

On that we agree - I turn the phone volume down :)

Another difference I have found is that we tend to smile to be polite whilst in Poland this did not seem to be the case. Is it because you smile only when you find things amusing?

Anyway - Vive la difference
Llyvellyn - | 15
22 Jan 2007  #21
Historical factor and your own action can play immense role in affecting Polish politeness. I myself currently live in Wales with 4 normal Polish workers. Initially they were quite defensive, but when they realize I know quite a lot about Poland and treat them with utmost respect (just 'pan' them all the time, well even I hint that pan Radomski (one Polish worker) may come from the old szlachta!), the relationship can not be better. They have given me an extraordinary amount of Polish films (including many of Polish classics) that I could never hope of finding them in Britain. They also asked me what Polish books I want and phoned their family to find and send them to me here (for free, of course). We now even hold a special Sunday 'obiad' weekly. It is just amazing if you know that I know very little Polish and their English is almost completely non-existent (5 dictionaries are always at hand). Though they are normal, average workers, I think they all share the same typically Polish characteristic: a great and fierce sense of dignity that would make them extremely polite if they are politely treated. I can't wait to visit their home in the Summer at their invitation!
OP iwona 12 | 542
22 Jan 2007  #22
I think that is totally unfair, Iwona askes in a positive way, she is not having a dig, she is merely showing cultural differences and asking the reasons behind it, one thing I do find the most irritating is when people spell others names incorrectly! Iwona...not Ivona...

Thank you Amathyst, it looks that my post was taken again in wrong way.

Another difference I have found is that we tend to smile to be polite whilst in Poland this did not seem to be the case. Is it because you smile only when you find things amusing?

That is true we don't smile as much as you and it is bad. Maybe we are more grumpy???? Or again culture differences.When people smile to you it makes you feel better.:) :) :) :)
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
22 Jan 2007  #23
Thank you Amathyst, it looks that my post was taken again in wrong way.

People on here tend not to look at the bigger picture and have a tendancy to jump on people without actually thinking things through, we all have little differences in cultures, as for the smiling, we have been here before and like I said I had a good look one morning and saw no glowing smiles on the way to work, but a load of miserable faces....I may add they were English miserable faces!
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
22 Jan 2007  #24
I admit, I may sound rude to Brits sometimes. It's beacause we use the word 'please' in the beginning of a sentence, and in English you say it in the end :) Sorry in advance :)
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
22 Jan 2007  #25
I use please at the beginning of a sentence..

Please may I have ......

and then we say thank you at the end...

in England we have a saying

Manners maketh a man
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
22 Jan 2007  #26
Please may I have ......

Hmmm, I was always taught at my schools ''Could I have a pint of beer, PLEASE ?''
I don't have problems with ''thank you'' though.

Manners maketh a man

Yup, very true.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
22 Jan 2007  #27
Okay here is an example....growing up as a child we had to ask for permission to leave the dinner table..

Please may I leave the table..

Please may I have a drink..etc.

Maybe its a little different when in a pub, I would say - I'll have a g&t please
EricLipisko
30 Jan 2007  #28
I think people are not so direct. Polish people in general do not "seeminglyto me" want to get to know someone if you are not introduced to them by a family member or something. If you say Good morning, afternoon or evening how are you? to someone in Poland they look at you as if you want to take their most prized possesion! I feel the older generation of Poles is more like this. "Older generation"---People who gre up in the comunism era. 30 + years old. Try asking someone in a supermarket about a game on tv or some interesting news while you stand in line adn see what type of reaction you get! Not a Good one!
Patrycja19 63 | 2,700
30 Jan 2007  #29
Ivona you must walk around with a broom stuck up your backside...I am the best, I am the best, you are SH.T

she never said that. and who the heck are you to even say such a thing!

Iwona is strait and to the point, and very nice person. u on the other hand are
hiding behind a fake name, calling her names, thats really big of you.

why dont you join and stop hiding!
OP iwona 12 | 542
30 Jan 2007  #30
:)thank you Patrycja.:)


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