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RUDE word form conjugation + communicating on facebook in Polish


tster
14 Jun 2014 #1
Hi,

Is there a name for the distinguishment between robić and zrobić?

I was told that pierdolić is to robić as pierdalać is to zrobić, i.e. one cannot say 'ja będę pierdalał'. Is that true? If so, why do I hear 'co odpierdalasz' more than I do 'co odpierdolisz', wouldn't the former refer to the future?

Also, in English, a Facebook status for me would consist of a photo + a sentence fragment with the gerund e.g. a picture of a cake in the oven with the caption 'Baking with x and y'. How do I convey this in Polish?

Dzięki,

Tomasz
Marysienka 1 | 195
14 Jun 2014 #2
the difference between robić i zrobić is called aspect en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grammatical_aspect#Slavic_languages

pier..... is a word that can mean anything, and I think you mean zapier.. -dolił (perfecitv), -dalał (imperfective)

And literally I would translate your facebook status : "piekąc ciasto z x I y", but it doesn't feel natural.
OP tster
14 Jun 2014 #3
So, what would you say in a facebook status (generally)? Would you use an entire sentence?
Marysienka 1 | 195
14 Jun 2014 #4
I don't post like that but I think I would use either full sentence - in present or past (pieczemy ciasto z x , piekłyśmy/piekliśmy ciasto z x)

And you can translate "baking with x" as "pieczenie z X " (noun instead of participle).
BohdanBazooka - | 24
15 Jun 2014 #5
ja będę pierdalał

There is no such word as "pierdalać", probably you meant ''pierdolić'' (which can mean anything, from having sex to talking nonsense), or ''wpierdalać'' (''to tuck in", ''to devour''). Or ''opierdalać (się)" = ''to slack off''. Or maybe a dozen or other words ;).

Basically, vulgar vocabulary is not a good example to learn Polish grammar from, because different forms (used in varoius context) can mean VERY different things and rules of grammatical conjugation do not always apply ;)

zapier.. -dolił (perfecitv), -dalał (imperfective)

For example, ''zapierdalać'' can mean ''to work very hard'' or ''to run very fast''... but ''zapierdolić'' means ''to steal, to snatch (something)" or ''to hit someone".

"Napierdalać" can mean ''to hurt" (as in ''łeb mnie napierdala" = ''my head hurts"), or ''to do something fast'', or ''to play music loud'' etc. while ''napierdolić się'' means ''to get drunk''.

I could go on with a long list of these examples and it would be only a tip of an iceberg.

It's not even like in case of ''uczyć'' (to teach) and ''uczyć się'' (to learn, to study), where there is some connection between those two verbs.

When we're talking about vulgar words, anything goes ;).

why do I hear 'co odpierdalasz' more than I do 'co odpierdolisz', wouldn't the former refer to the future?

More or less, you are right.
''Co (ty) odpierdalasz'' means something like "What the f*ck are you doing", "What's your problem", etc. It definitely doesn't sound well in future tense.
OP tster
17 Jun 2014 #6
Okay, thanks. My Polish teacher (I'm young, but hey, this is essential Polish vocab frankly -- especially to socialise with Poles my age) said -pierdolić was the imperfective form of -pierdalać. It seems she just got muddled.

Thank you!
cinek 2 | 344
24 Jun 2014 #7
said -pierdolić was the imperfective form of -pierdalać. It seems she just got muddled.

No, she was right. She just meant the whole -pierdolić/-pierdalać family of words that are created by prefixing these stems e.g.:

od-pierdolić / od-pierdalać to do something wrong/strange
pod-pierdolić / pod-pierdalać to steal, to denounce,
s-pierdolić / s-pierdalać to escape, to fail

etc.

Cinek
BohdanBazooka - | 24
24 Jun 2014 #8
She just meant the whole -pierdolić/-pierdalać family of words that are created by prefixing these stems e.g.:

Yes, in terms of grammar, she was right. But the point is no one in Poland uses "pierdalać" ("pierdalam", "pierdalasz" etc.) as standalone words.

All forms of "pierdalać", at least according to my knowledge, always come with prefixes, while ''pierdolić" can be used without them.

And for clarification: "odpierdolisz" is definitely future tense (I misread the original poster's question).

Ex: "Odpierdolisz się ode mnie, czy nie?" "Will you get the f**k off of me, or not?"
f stop 25 | 2,513
24 Jun 2014 #9
This is very amusing. ;)
cinek 2 | 344
1 Jul 2014 #10
But the point is no one in Poland uses "pierdalać" ("pierdalam", "pierdalasz" etc.) as standalone words.

Nobody said that. The '-' before the stem means "put a prefix here" and that was meant in the original question as far as I understood.

Cinek
BohdanBazooka - | 24
2 Jul 2014 #11
The '-' before the stem means "put a prefix here" and that was meant in the original question

There's no '-' before 'pierdalać' in the original question, but let's not get into such hair-splitting ;).

Back on topic - here's a gem from a cult classic Polish movie that illustrates the ambiguity of word 'pierdolić'.

Watch from 1:33 - I couldn't find that scene alone:

youtube.com/watch?v=fmljn3e-ux0
Thom1203
8 Feb 2020 #12
Merged:

Facebook in Poland



Do Poles use Polish on Facebook or English?

Those who live in Poland!
pawian 170 | 11,590
8 Feb 2020 #13
I use English and pigeon Polish. Why?
Lyzko 25 | 7,139
8 Feb 2020 #14
Sure you don't mean Polish and pigeon English?
LOL
pawian 170 | 11,590
8 Feb 2020 #15
No, I know what I mean. That`s because I conside Facebook a total joke and play silly games there all the time. :))


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