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Do you think that Polish people are rude?


miranda
26 Mar 2007 #121
Szarlotka,
I didn't know there was one:). Got to hurry.....
szarlotka 8 | 2,208
26 Mar 2007 #122
I didn't know there was one

There is now and Grzegorz is in charge of it. Therefore I intend to be extra nice to both him (cos I'd like to be allowed back occasionally) and all the other Polish residents (because I am a very, very nice person).
miranda
26 Mar 2007 #123
Sz,
darn, if Grzegorz is in charge I will never get in:).

Oh, well.....
szarlotka 8 | 2,208
26 Mar 2007 #124
darn, if Grzegorz is in charge I will never get in

You've got a much better chance than me M:)

Having been away for a few days I get the distinct impression that every discussion is being recycled. I am tempted to start a new thread. Options include:

1) Existentialism. As a reaction against more traditional philosophies, such as rationalism and empiricism, does it provide a realistic alternative.

2) Was Wanda Rutkiewicz the greatest advertisement ever for the Polish people?

3) I once fell madly in love with a Polish girl but she had an Iron Curtain for a chastity belt.

:) :) :)
daffy 23 | 1,500
26 Mar 2007 #125
I once fell madly in love with a Polish girl but she had an Iron Curtain for a chastity belt.

kinky :) did you erect nato missles to penetrate deep into the iron curtain? :P
szarlotka 8 | 2,208
26 Mar 2007 #126
It's a love story not a lust story Daffy:)

Shame on you.
FISZ 24 | 2,116
26 Mar 2007 #127
Quoting: szarlotka I once fell madly in love with a Polish girl but she had an Iron Curtain for a chastity belt.

Better than P***y troll :)
miranda
26 Mar 2007 #128
or
4) The influance of eating pierogies on weight gain among internationl investors in Poland in the the 90's.
5) Is the Iron Curtain really gone and if it is, can it be really proved.
6) Why do dogs mix/don't with other breeds?

:) :) :)
daffy 23 | 1,500
26 Mar 2007 #129
It's a love story not a lust story Daffy

Shame on you.

your right of course - i am in shame :)

or
4) The influance of eating pierogies on weight gain among internationl investors in Poland in the the 90's.
5) Is the Iron Curtain really gone and if it is, can it be really proved.
6) Why do dogs mix/don't with other breeds?

:)
szarlotka 8 | 2,208
26 Mar 2007 #130
The influance of eating pierogies on weight gain among internationl investors in Poland in the the 90's.

If it involves practical research then I vote for this one:)
POLSKA_LASKA
30 Apr 2007 #131
YO!!!! IM POLISH AND PROUD!!!!!!
WERE THE BEST ROKIN PEOPLE OUT THERE!!!!!!!
POLSKA RESPECT!!!!!!!!! YEYE
MESS WITH POLISH PEOPLE AND WELL KICK UR A$$!!!!
DONT MESS WITH US!

GO POLSKA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,506
30 Apr 2007 #132
youre right... poland has a reputation for kikin a$$...
witek 1 | 587
30 Apr 2007 #133
POLSKA_LASKA

fotki please
Matyjasz 2 | 1,544
30 Apr 2007 #134
youre right... poland has a reputation for kikin a$$...

What was that supposed to mean?
sparrow 2 | 243
30 Apr 2007 #135
While scrolling over the threads I read this as "Do you think that Polish people are nude?"

Should I seek counseling?

No, but it shows what your thinking ;)edited by moderator Please also try to post something on topic dzieki
Ken Noddy 2 | 161
30 Apr 2007 #136
Most polish people are really nice, very helpful and very gracious.

My experience of Polish people has changed my outlook on life....for the better.

I'm from Northern Ireland and recently a couple of Polish girls started working in the same building as me.

Girls in general seem to ignore me but this girl in particular is very friendly and always has a smile and a hello when I see her. She is stunningly beautiful and it has totally taken me aback. No-one I've met in my country is anywhere near as pretty as she but they act like pampered supermodels. I had almost given up hope on the female race until my Polish angel arrived.

I'm very shy and am unsure what to do next, I know I should try to talk to her more but my Polish is sketchy at best and she is bound to reject me.
mickster 1 | 17
30 Apr 2007 #137
I don't want to generalise so I can only talk on my own personal experience.

I live in Dublin..........my neighbours are Polish and so are some of my work colleagues and they are not / do not come across as rude at all!
Mala_Elf 13 | 17
3 May 2007 #138
Polish people are exceptionally nice.
daffy 23 | 1,500
4 May 2007 #139
ah mala, nice and rude is not nation specific, its person specific - ive met lovely polish/irish for eg and equally ive met rude polish/irish

but i wouldnt attached 'rudenss' to the polish people (or the french lol) ;)
TheKruk 3 | 308
4 May 2007 #140
I agree with Daffy but why does everyone crowd into the bus or tram as if it were the last bus or tram EVER to go to their destination ? ole ladies push me and my 2 year old girl out of the way like we are not even there. And when my wife was pregnant no man ever gave up his seat for her only women. Its strange for a culture so used to waiting on lines they are terrible at it, they will cut in front of you any chance they get I constantly ask people in English if they would like to share my trousers with me, because they get so close. They just look strangely at me a few who understand laugh.
shopgirl 6 | 928
5 May 2007 #141
I agree with Daffy but why does everyone crowd into the bus or tram as if it were the last bus or tram EVER to go to their destination ?

Ahhh, the "sardine instinct". You can also witness this at Disneyland :)
fea
6 May 2007 #142
All of this things that TheKruk said have their reason in the years of comunism knocked down just in 1989. After the end of the Second World War to this date, people generally didn't have their own transport because it was to expensive and uneconomic. So they chose buses/trams/trains to get to place they want. And there were so many of them... that, as I know from the histories that some members of my family have told me, not seldom that bus or tram WAS the last mean of transport that could take them off. And why that historic situation have reflection today? Thats our cultural heritage :D That our bus-rudeness is slowly decreasing but it will have place unless the last people of comunism era don't comprehend that they are not the centre of the universe.

Take a look that great percent of young don't participate in this. They come to the bus at last and generally stand all the route.

I always stand ;) unless I have my legs healthy I let the others sit, but I hate the situation that you wrote. Pregnant woman/old man/lady and young teen on the bad sides of bus chair :DDD In this situation you have to intervene.

Sorry for my english.
pzdr
fea
Jar 1 | 10
9 May 2007 #143
really don't like it "are you all right".....What is the point of it? This person doesn't know me personally and is not interested if I am "all right" or not.

This is used as a general greeting the same as hi, it dosnt really mean anything.
freebird
9 May 2007 #144
nice and rude is not nation specific, its person specific

good one
hanulka
11 May 2007 #145
According to the comparative research I have conducted, in Polish "please" is replaced by a specific intonation pattern (rise-fall at the beginning of the utterance) which means the same. The Poles frequently use it when speaking foreign languages, believing that it has the same function independent of the particular language, i.e., not giving it any thought at all - they just feel that they are being adequately polite because they let their voice rise and fall during the first two syllables, and no "please" is needed any more ... I still cannot get rid of this pattern although I have been living in Germany for the past 17 years. This is just one aspect of the politeness problem, but there are dozens of such "small differences" which are largely unrealised, and influence the impressions on both sides.

Ciao
Hanulka
gingerstar61
6 Aug 2007 #146
We have some new neighbours, a polish couple and so far have found them being a bit inconsiderate and rude.

Maybe there is some truth in an Englishman's home is his castle, because we are very proud of ours, and I was wondering if the same principle is true for polish people?

They've parked partway over our driveway on a regular basis (until I started leaving my own car parked over our driveway to keep it clear), they removed our fence to paint there shed while we were out, and when we returned were sitting on our path painting it, which I have no problem with, it was just the fact they did not speak a word to us as we were walking around them on our path with our shopping and had not asked permission to be there. I know they can speak english, as the only time they bother is to ask us to keep our cats off their garden.

It makes me feel like moving out, as would any neighbour acting this way, I feel intimidated to go outside sometimes and I was wondering if this is the way they would treat neighbours in their own country, if it's just a polish culture thing or if it's just that as individuals they are generally that way.

I'd appreciate your comments, as I'm hoping its just them as individuals, and that there are some nice polish people out there! x
Daisy 3 | 1,224
6 Aug 2007 #147
You've got off to a bad start with your neighbours. I don't think you can put it down to their nationality, people have problems with their neighbours all over the world.

I can't speak for your situation, but is it possible they did not realise the fence was yours, have you asked them?
tornado2007 11 | 2,270
6 Aug 2007 #148
I don't think you can put it down to their nationality

your dead right Daisy, totally agree with this point, its not about nationality its about individual personality, when will people wake up and see this!!!!
Wyspianska
6 Aug 2007 #149
Are u talking about bubbaWOOO?
answer is:
taadaammm:
Never
BubbaWoo 33 | 3,506
6 Aug 2007 #150
experience suggests that poles are neither theives nor rude... they do, however, tend to have large noses and are terrible drivers, some of them are also pretty stupid... but thats obviously got nothing to do with nationality

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