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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


Philip 666 - | 36
29 Sep 2019  #781
@Zlatko I notice that Biedronka is slowly changing its products to fit alternative needs. Examples being gluten free bread and lactose free milk.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
29 Sep 2019  #782
Now, why on earth have Poles never pickled onions?

It is funny you still don`t understand the Polish culture after so many years. Poles don`t need pickled onions coz they enjoy other pickled stuff, like cucumbers, peppers or mushrooms. Do Brits eat them? No, they prefer pickled onions. Very stupid of them, I must say. :):)

As for never in your post, never say never in the forum coz you are wrong. Pickled onions are available.

The only time I ever had pickled onions was when they were in with Polish pickled pigs feet.

Yes, they are good for decoration but eating them is a crazy idea. Yuk.
Dougpol1 30 | 3,046
29 Sep 2019  #783
Wot is the matter with you Pawian? I have experienced plenty about Polish culture thank you very much. Everything has to be a put down with you, hasn't it? Enjoy the weather at your country house, and chill out.

I asked why Poles don't pickle onions. Maf answered my question ; there is really no need for you to chip in with your "I love everything Polish and we wouldn't sink to that..." bit every single time I post an opinion.

It's so tiresome.

Pickled onions are available.

No. Those are not onions - they are shallots.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
29 Sep 2019  #784
there is really no need for you to chip in with your

I will always chip in when people are at a loss about Polish things, like you. It is my job. Get used to it. :):)

chill out.

I am chilled out. It is you who seemed on the nervous breakdown because Poles don`t like pickled onions. Check out your own words.

I asked why Poles don't pickle onions. Maf answered my question

Yes, he did, but also without really referring to the Polish culture. So there I came and explained as it should be.

No. Those are not onions - they are shallots.

Aaa, you mean those small ones? Yes, indeed, I saw only them in shops.
What? So you expect Poles to pickle big onions??? Are you crazy??? :):) I think I will throw up now as I am eating Sunday dinner. How can Brits even take it into their mouths?

I have experienced plenty about Polish culture thank you very much.

No, the fact that you are making a big hallo about the lack of pickled big onions in Poland means you have experienced nothing. :))
Zlatko
29 Sep 2019  #785
@Philip 666
Thank you! Too bad pierogi are off limits. Well my intolerance is mild enough to try them once at least. :)

I was surprised Poles also have stuffed cabbage leaves and flaki soup. The more you learn. :)
Dougpol1 30 | 3,046
29 Sep 2019  #786
@pawian
You sound like a real barrel of laughs. I'm glad I wasn't in your class at school. Enjoy your "Polishness".
In the meantime, the world has moved on. Don't you teach your students that there is a big wide world out there?
mafketis 20 | 7,317
29 Sep 2019  #787
How can Brits even take it into their mouths?

I'm pretty sure the onions are sliced up. But still, they're raw, pickled onions.
I only recently discovered that many (most?) Poles treat raw onions with suspicion, they can be used in small amounts in some salads but they seemed to be regarded with suspicion as being harmful to digestion (and the liver according to a friend).

I'm also surprised that Polish people don't pickle eggs. I used to enjoy the pink pickled eggs sold in convenience stores in the US... I thought I would hate it, but... not that bad.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
29 Sep 2019  #788
Enjoy your "Polishness".

I really do. Therefore, I don`t visit British fora and complain that Brits don`t eat this or that. That would be so moronic. Do you get the point?

Don't you teach your students that there is a big wide world out there?

Yes, I do it. That is why, when they go to Britain, they won`t moan that Brits don`t eat this or that. :):) Do you get the point, Mr Expert on Polish Culture? hahaha

many (most?) Poles treat raw onions with suspicion, they can be used in small amounts in some salads

You are probably right, with one noble exception, namely me, who has eaten raw onion regularly and my liver is still doing well. It isn`t raw onion which is harmful, but fried one. Unfortunately, I also like it.

I'm also surprised that Polish people don't pickle eggs.

Admit now that you are mentioning them to make me puke again. :):)

I already talked about pickled eggs when linking to the film by that expat Polish chef. Pickled eggs are No 1 of most disgusting food in Britain on his list and he throws up the longest and heaviest of all after trying them.

At 13.20

youtu.be/wxrxwSCB31U
Dougpol1 30 | 3,046
29 Sep 2019  #789
Do you get the point?

I have lived here for 30 years now - so don't require your permission to comment. Though it seems sometimes that you don't brook any feedback of any sort but just enjoy sounding off.
kaprys 2 | 1,868
30 Sep 2019  #790
@mafketis
Well, I eat sliced or chopped raw onion -on tomato sandwiches or in salads. I know others who do, too.
As for pickled onions, the thing is that onions are used for lots of preservatives for flavour and then thrown away with bay leaf and allspice. It's used for seasoning. As for making pickled onions at home, I believe there are ingredients available for anyone willing to do it.

Pickled pig legs?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
30 Sep 2019  #791
I'm pretty sure the onions are sliced up

They're not. They're pickled whole, but these are small onions, sometimes known as silverskin. They're definitely a British thing.

pink pickled eggs

I've not had pink ones before, but in my house growing up, everything was pickled or preserved, onions, eggs, red cabbage, gherkins...........

raw onion

Love it in sandwiches or rolls. Goes well with cheese.
mafketis 20 | 7,317
30 Sep 2019  #792
small onions, sometimes known as silverskin

After checking wiki..... they look like cocktail onions... Those are a dish in the UK?
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
30 Sep 2019  #793
they look like cocktail onions

The silverskin ones do. The ones my parents pickled weren't silverskin, they were bigger and crunchier, although I still think they're known as baby onions.

None of them are actually a dish maf, they are served as an accompaniment to cold meats or cheese.
johnny reb 17 | 3,873
30 Sep 2019  #794
Pickled pig legs?

I am not joking you.
You can buy pickled pigs feet in most large grocery stores.
The meat is very tender and sweet.
I know they sound unappetizing but once you get past the visual they are quite a delicacy.
One of my Polish fathers favorite snacks.

I eat sliced or chopped raw onion -on tomato sandwiches

My favorite is a grilled cheese sandwich with a slice of sweet onion and a slice of tomato in it while grilling.
I will have to admit that you Polish girls are much more creative with your recipes then American women are.
mafketis 20 | 7,317
30 Sep 2019  #795
You can buy pickled pigs feet in most large grocery stores.

Everywhere? I associate pickled pigs feet with the south and African Americans, that is anyone in the south might like them while in other parts of the country it will mostly be black people (similar dynamic with things like collard greens or pork rinds).

They're not a million miles away from nóżki w galarecie though nóżki aren't pickled though vinegar is poured on them at the table...

Here's an appetizing image indicated that they are sometimes dyed pink.... for some reason

pigs feet
johnny reb 17 | 3,873
30 Sep 2019  #796
Everywhere?

Everywhere in the U.S.A. anyways.

aren't pickled though vinegar is poured on them at the table...

I would tend to disagree with that.
Pickled pigs feet is a type of pork associated with Cuisine of the Southern United States, Mexican, Chinese, and Scandinavian cuisine.
The feet of domestic pigs are typically salted and smoked in the same manner as other pork cuts, such as hams and bacon.
It is common to preserve them in a manner very similar to home canning and processes for pickled vegetables typically a saturation of hot vinegar brine is used.

bing.com/search?q=pickled+pigs+feet+jar
mafketis 20 | 7,317
30 Sep 2019  #797
I would tend to disagree with tha

I was taking about the Polish dish nóżki w galarecie (jellied (pig) legs) which is shredded and boiled meat from pigs feet served with vegetables in jelly the pig meat isn't pickled but people pour vinegar on it at the table, pickled pigs feet would remind a Polish person of nóżki...

jelly
johnny reb 17 | 3,873
30 Sep 2019  #798
Ah, thank you for your patience in explaining that to me.
Much appreciated.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
30 Sep 2019  #799
I have lived here for 30 years now - so don't require your permission to comment.

No, it wasn`t about a permission. I was just surprised you asked such a desperate question about pickled onions. Never mind.

You can buy pickled pigs feet in most large grocery stores

In Poland you can get only fresh feet called nóżki and use them for galareta/jelly dishes as maf already explained. But they contain little meat so recipes advise to add other kinds of pork, e.g, ham hock.



Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
3 Oct 2019  #800
Polish dish nóżki w galarecie (

I don't like the look of it, but I would probably try it.

fresh feet called nóżki

We would call those trotters in the UK.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
5 Oct 2019  #801
How often do you eat trotters in the UK? :)

Pig ears had seemed so fascinatingly exotic food to me that when I spotted them in KEY FOODS chain in the USA, I couldn`t resist. As an inexperienced amateur cook, I put them directly onto the frying pan. I was gravely disturbed to find out they were inedible when fried - as tough as a shoe sole. That was my first and I vaguley remember last experiment with ears.

No photo this time.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,054
11 Oct 2019  #802
How often do you eat trotters in the UK? :)

I have to confess I've never actually eaten them.......they were popular a long time ago being a cheap cut of meat, but I think these days it would be older people who might still eat them. Same with tripe. Tripe these days is usually bought for pet food. I would try trotters, but would probably have to go to a butcher to get them, not the demand for supermarkets to stock them.

last experiment with ears.

I should feel repulsed, but strangely, I don't. Ears are popular in Thailand.........deep frying is the answer I think.


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