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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


OP pawian 173 | 13,488
4 Apr 2020 #811
Never heard of them before, tbh.

I also found the recipe only a few weeks ago. But I don`t regret. Today I had them with pieces of pork in mushroom sauce.

Still digesting krokiety :)

Good stuff - crispy and soft inside.
But - what about Lent? haha
Elroy
5 Apr 2020 #812
kwestiasmaku.com For nice recipes also Polish with a twist!
kaprys 3 | 2,466
5 Apr 2020 #813
@pawian
I made them with sauerkraut and mushrooms.
Unless you don't even eat fried foods during the Lent.

Actually, the religious idea of not eating certain foods is not that bad healthwise, IMO.
Paulwiz 1 | 70
11 Apr 2020 #814
I grew up having a dish at Easter made with grated horseradish and beets. I cheated this year and bought a small jar of grated horseradish. (Too hard to find good horseradish and too painful to grate it by hand) It is too hot to eat it by itself but it goes great on ham and hard boiled eggs. I am almost certain it is Polish but it might not be. Does this sound familiar?
jon357 63 | 15,524
12 Apr 2020 #815
It's ćwikła. Every shop sells it here in Poland. It isn't just an easter thing, people buy it all year round.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrain
mafketis 24 | 8,843
12 Apr 2020 #816
. It isn't just an easter thing

But horseradish is definitely even more important for easter (normally a part of święconka)

Before coming to Poland I hated horseradish and Polish horseradish is still the only type I can stand (even in Germany it was...blllhhh)
jon357 63 | 15,524
12 Apr 2020 #817
Before coming to Poland I hated horseradish and Polish horseradish is still the only type I can stand

I'm the opposite; used to quite strong horseradish, the kind traditionally served with roast beef back home. We always had quite a bit growing on the farm.

The stuff here is OK, especially if it's prepared as ćwikła, though very very mild.
Ironside 49 | 10,612
12 Apr 2020 #818
though very very mild.

Well it is processed stuff. The best stuff with a good kick comes from freshly grated horseradish, a one you pull out of the ground yourself.
Ironside 49 | 10,612
12 Apr 2020 #819
from the ground ...

Everybody who complains that Polish foot is bland should try it at least once. As well as a properly seasoned 'flaczki'.
Paulwiz 1 | 70
12 Apr 2020 #820
Thanks. Bunch of new food dishes to research.

I had a reasonable sized chunk of horseradish left over one year so I stuck it in the garden. What can it hurt, right? Stuff started to take over the garden! I dug out as much as I could but it came back almost as fast. That is one tough plant! Of course my real problems started when I ran over it with a rototiller. Bad move.

If I ever make it to Poland I'll look for ćwikła, now that I know it is available year-round.
jon357 63 | 15,524
12 Apr 2020 #821
The best stuff with a good kick comes from freshly grated horseradish, a one you pull out of the ground yourself.

Always.

Polish foot is bland

Compared to India, Mexico etc, it is certainly bland; people like the idea of 'łagodny' here. It isn't for nothing that the word 'majonez' is used as an intensifying adjective now, in the expression "git majonez".

A while ago, I was at a very formal dinner in a hotel in Kato. The people there were mostly Poles, a few people originally from other countries, France, Ukraine and me. They served two soups, one was a very good zupa grzybowa, the other was a sort of thick and sweet puree with coconut and pear, basically baby food. The Poles were all saying how wonderful the baby food was, whereas the rest of us thought it was awful and enjoyed the zupa grzybowa.
kaprys 3 | 2,466
12 Apr 2020 #822
Just to make it clear cwikla is grated beetroots with horseradish but grated horseradish is also one of traditional Easter foods.
Both available and eaten all year round.
jon357 63 | 15,524
12 Apr 2020 #823
Of course my real problems started when I ran over it with a rototiller. Bad move.

It really spreads and takes hold; a bit like mint, once you've got it it's there forever.

If you don't like it too hot, leave it for a while after grating and before preserving.
Paulwiz 1 | 70
12 Apr 2020 #824
There seems to be several "tricks", like avoid using metal and seal it well to keep air out. I had some pretty wimpy ćwikła until I learned the tricks.

Hot foods are pretty interesting. Horseradish is great since (at the risk of sounding indelicate) it is only hot on the way in. Not so with peppers. But enough ...

As I discerned that I was losing the horseradish pandemic, I resorted to chemical warfare. I got some of the baddest plant killer I could find and applied it. About all it did was to curl the leaves a bit more than normal. I have heard since that you should plant it in a large pot or half-barrel. But one guy told me that it can still jump out of the barrel. Horseradish zombie apocalypse!
jon357 63 | 15,524
12 Apr 2020 #825
Horseradish

The plant is a relative of mustard. Kale too.

Horseradish zombie apocalypse!

It would probably survive nuclear war, together with Betty White and Keith Richards.
OP pawian 173 | 13,488
22 Aug 2020 #826
What? We forgot about our wonderful food thread??? Shame on us.

Joohny, I keep your most awesome posts in my archives, I learnt it from you, do you remember how you mentioned your barbecue occasion on 12th July?

Then stop at the market to get a couple of family packs of chicken wings to get marinating for the grill later this evening for another BBQ after a swim at the beach. What a beautiful summer. Damn life is good.

polanda.com/off-topic/random-chat-74400/1929/#msg1746086

Yes, I agreed with you that life is/was so good.
I found it most fascinating you mentioned only chicken wings. Was it because of diet and health reasons? I am asking coz we still don`t care about health when we have a barbecue. Not only do we use an old charcoal grill (cancer from smoke) but we also consume most fattening meats from it. Luckily, it happens once in fortnight and mostly in summer, sometimes spring, too.

What horrible unhealthy foods do we have? I like wings, too. My family also like Polish sausage and pork slices of: ham, neck, bacon in various marinades, e.g. chilli or apricot. Plus chicken or pork schishkebab. And various other staff.

We seldom use our own marinades coz those supermarket ones are OK to us. Yes, I know, they are full of artificial stuff but we don`t care.

Oh, and we grill potatoes at the same time.




  • Assorted stuff

  • Bacon

  • My plate. Salads are not in view.
OP pawian 173 | 13,488
22 Aug 2020 #827
I forgot to mention that the grill we use is too small for our family so I always put another serving of meat on it.
Lenka 3 | 2,187
22 Aug 2020 #828
My family also like Polish sausage

Oh my, something for my taste! Forget all the fancy marinated meat - give me grilled Podwawelska with a baguette with garlic butter and a beer and I'm the happiest girl alive :)

Omg, it's been such a long time since I had grill :(
OP pawian 173 | 13,488
2 Sep 2020 #829
Step by step, I introduce kids to eating exotic foods. One of them are shrimps - at first, kids look at them with utter disgust but gradually they change their mind.



OP pawian 173 | 13,488
5 Sep 2020 #830
I never go to KFC and similar eateries which offer fried chicken. Yet, I like to eat it from time ti time - I can get it in a shop and cook at home. Not bad - I especially like its chilli version.



OP pawian 173 | 13,488
4 Oct 2020 #831
This year I have grown about 50 tomato plants - all my own seedlings After a few weeks of eating a kilo every day, we started looking at them with a little disgust. I got a sudden idea of pickling them for winter like cucumbers. I have already prepared about 20 big jars. After two weeks of fermentation, I opened one. Wow, delicious. Amazing taste! I devoured all of them coz my family didn`t want. Strange people.

Ingredients: garlic, horseradish root or leaves, dill, sugar, salt, a little vinegar, water. I pour warm water over the tomatoes and tightly close the jars - no boiling afterwards!. One week is enough to get it pickled. Sugar is my invention coz I want them to be a little sweet. I added salt at the beginning but after the first series I stopped. Vinegar to make them a little sour.



johnny reb 28 | 5,041
7 Oct 2020 #832
Joohny, I learnt it from you, do you remember how you mentioned your barbecue occasion on 12th July?

That would be the 4th of July, the United States Independence Day holiday when everyone grills..
To be honest Pawian, I limit myself to grilled foods as good as all those pictures look.
Remember, when grilling, if you burn meat it brings out cancer causing carcinogens.
Carcinogens are present in grilled foods.
The process of grilling your food, especially if it's chicken, can change the food's structure on a molecular level.
This change can turn your grilled food into carcinogenic food.
The safer option is to boil or bake your food like most authentic Polish foods.
Your tomatoes look absolutely delicious.
Eating to many like you did can cause inflammation (arthritis flare up) in old people like us so pay attention.
The traditional cuisine of Poland is characterized by meat and vegetables, especially potatoes and dills.
Lunch and dinner tend to be heavy.
Breakfast is usually simple, often meatless, and eaten before 9 a.m. in Poland.
OP pawian 173 | 13,488
7 Oct 2020 #833
That would be the 4th of July

No, I meant your post from 12th July.

Remember, when grilling, if you burn meat it brings out cancer causing carcinogens.

Yes, of course. But I also consume a lot of carcinogens killers at the same time so there is balance in nature.

Eating to many like you did can cause inflammation (arthritis flare up)

You mean joints are affected? Fortunately, I have a remedy for ot, too - my amazing amber spirit - all aches in joins or bones vanish after 2 days - I recommend it sincerely to you.
OP pawian 173 | 13,488
10 Oct 2020 #834
Your tomatoes look absolutely delicious.

Thank you very much. Reading about pickling them, I found a mention of using green tomatoes - popular in Ukraine or Belarus. Today I collected the last bucket of tomatoes, they are mostly green coz the plants have already died. Tomorrow I am going to put them in jars.
OP pawian 173 | 13,488
14 Oct 2020 #835
These are my two fav plates - when I can`t use them, I feel uneasy. Mostly I am able to fit my dishes onto one, but sometimes both are necessary.

E.g.,


  • Buckwheat, royal prawns, salad in a pot coz the biggest bowl was taken

  • Plaice, my own potatoes, own beans, own salad

  • Stuffed peppers
Lenka 3 | 2,187
14 Oct 2020 #836
I am cooking fuczki now which comes from Bieszczady

I did them today. It was ok but I won't be repeating it.
Chemikiem 6 | 2,327
14 Oct 2020 #837
my two fav plates - when I can`t use them, I feel uneasy.

Strange.......are you superstitious?

We would call those royal prawns king prawns.
OP pawian 173 | 13,488
14 Oct 2020 #838
I did them today. It was ok but I won't be repeating it.

hahaha There is sth to it, I also don`t dream of cooking them again.

Strange.......are you superstitious?

No, I am only loyal to people, animals and things that make me feel good. Did you notice those blue motifs - it is my fav colour.

We would call those royal prawns king prawns.

Yes, I know but it is a bit male chauvinistic and misogynist to say so, therefore I say royal. You should skip that inappropriate name, too .
Chemikiem 6 | 2,327
14 Oct 2020 #839
fuczki

I just had to look up what these were, never heard of them before.

Did you notice those blue motifs - it is my fav colour.

I see.

it is a bit male chauvinistic and misogynist to say so

Hahaha.


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