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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


OP pawian 171 | 12,080
4 Apr 2020 #811
Never heard of them before, tbh.

I also found the recipe only a few weeks ago. But I don`t regret. Today I had them with pieces of pork in mushroom sauce.

Still digesting krokiety :)

Good stuff - crispy and soft inside.
But - what about Lent? haha
Elroy
5 Apr 2020 #812
kwestiasmaku.com For nice recipes also Polish with a twist!
kaprys 3 | 2,415
5 Apr 2020 #813
@pawian
I made them with sauerkraut and mushrooms.
Unless you don't even eat fried foods during the Lent.

Actually, the religious idea of not eating certain foods is not that bad healthwise, IMO.
Paulwiz 1 | 70
11 Apr 2020 #814
I grew up having a dish at Easter made with grated horseradish and beets. I cheated this year and bought a small jar of grated horseradish. (Too hard to find good horseradish and too painful to grate it by hand) It is too hot to eat it by itself but it goes great on ham and hard boiled eggs. I am almost certain it is Polish but it might not be. Does this sound familiar?
jon357 63 | 15,068
12 Apr 2020 #815
It's ćwikła. Every shop sells it here in Poland. It isn't just an easter thing, people buy it all year round.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chrain
mafketis 23 | 8,543
12 Apr 2020 #816
. It isn't just an easter thing

But horseradish is definitely even more important for easter (normally a part of święconka)

Before coming to Poland I hated horseradish and Polish horseradish is still the only type I can stand (even in Germany it was...blllhhh)
jon357 63 | 15,068
12 Apr 2020 #817
Before coming to Poland I hated horseradish and Polish horseradish is still the only type I can stand

I'm the opposite; used to quite strong horseradish, the kind traditionally served with roast beef back home. We always had quite a bit growing on the farm.

The stuff here is OK, especially if it's prepared as ćwikła, though very very mild.
Ironside 49 | 10,375
12 Apr 2020 #818
though very very mild.

Well it is processed stuff. The best stuff with a good kick comes from freshly grated horseradish, a one you pull out of the ground yourself.
Ironside 49 | 10,375
12 Apr 2020 #819
from the ground ...

Everybody who complains that Polish foot is bland should try it at least once. As well as a properly seasoned 'flaczki'.
Paulwiz 1 | 70
12 Apr 2020 #820
Thanks. Bunch of new food dishes to research.

I had a reasonable sized chunk of horseradish left over one year so I stuck it in the garden. What can it hurt, right? Stuff started to take over the garden! I dug out as much as I could but it came back almost as fast. That is one tough plant! Of course my real problems started when I ran over it with a rototiller. Bad move.

If I ever make it to Poland I'll look for ćwikła, now that I know it is available year-round.
jon357 63 | 15,068
12 Apr 2020 #821
The best stuff with a good kick comes from freshly grated horseradish, a one you pull out of the ground yourself.

Always.

Polish foot is bland

Compared to India, Mexico etc, it is certainly bland; people like the idea of 'łagodny' here. It isn't for nothing that the word 'majonez' is used as an intensifying adjective now, in the expression "git majonez".

A while ago, I was at a very formal dinner in a hotel in Kato. The people there were mostly Poles, a few people originally from other countries, France, Ukraine and me. They served two soups, one was a very good zupa grzybowa, the other was a sort of thick and sweet puree with coconut and pear, basically baby food. The Poles were all saying how wonderful the baby food was, whereas the rest of us thought it was awful and enjoyed the zupa grzybowa.
kaprys 3 | 2,415
12 Apr 2020 #822
Just to make it clear cwikla is grated beetroots with horseradish but grated horseradish is also one of traditional Easter foods.
Both available and eaten all year round.
jon357 63 | 15,068
12 Apr 2020 #823
Of course my real problems started when I ran over it with a rototiller. Bad move.

It really spreads and takes hold; a bit like mint, once you've got it it's there forever.

If you don't like it too hot, leave it for a while after grating and before preserving.
Paulwiz 1 | 70
12 Apr 2020 #824
There seems to be several "tricks", like avoid using metal and seal it well to keep air out. I had some pretty wimpy ćwikła until I learned the tricks.

Hot foods are pretty interesting. Horseradish is great since (at the risk of sounding indelicate) it is only hot on the way in. Not so with peppers. But enough ...

As I discerned that I was losing the horseradish pandemic, I resorted to chemical warfare. I got some of the baddest plant killer I could find and applied it. About all it did was to curl the leaves a bit more than normal. I have heard since that you should plant it in a large pot or half-barrel. But one guy told me that it can still jump out of the barrel. Horseradish zombie apocalypse!
jon357 63 | 15,068
12 Apr 2020 #825
Horseradish

The plant is a relative of mustard. Kale too.

Horseradish zombie apocalypse!

It would probably survive nuclear war, together with Betty White and Keith Richards.


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