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What do non-Poles think about eating the following Polish foods?


Chemikiem 7 | 2,396
15 Oct 2020 #841
We mentioned them in April

I obviously missed them, but I'm not sure I would bother making them, they don't really appeal to me.

Down with discriminatory food names!!!!

But for balance there are queen scallops :) I've never seen them in Poland though:

amseafoods.co.uk/products/queen-scallops/
OP pawian 176 | 14,299
15 Oct 2020 #842
but I'm not sure I would bother making them, they don't really appeal to me.

Of course, Brits don`t like sauerkraut - it looks and smells rotten to them.
jon357 63 | 15,607
15 Oct 2020 #843
Brits don`t like sauerkraut

They've sold it in the UK for many years. Jars of Krakus sauerkraut always used to be in the shops. Personally I can't abide it.
OP pawian 176 | 14,299
15 Oct 2020 #844
They've sold it in the UK for many years.

Yes, of course. But selling sth doesn`t mean it is popular. :)

ars of Krakus sauerkraut always used to be in the shops.

For Brits of Polish origin or native Poles - RAF squadrons airmen, Anders` Army, etc.
dolnoslask 6 | 3,193
15 Oct 2020 #845
Jars of Krakus sauerkraut

,
they always had it in our local uk polskie sklep , the basis for bigos , oh and its the only brand of ogurki (gurkins?) I would buy.
jon357 63 | 15,607
15 Oct 2020 #846
For Brits of Polish origin or native Poles

For anybody probably. Most larger food shops and some smaller ones in my home town stocked Polish products, sauerkraut, gherkins, jam, tinned meat.

Plenty of Poles and Ukrainians there (who came after the war) however as I remember there were some many things from Poland that others must have bought them too. We always had Polish products at home, especially gherkins and jam but also sauerkraut sometimes. They started to disappear from the shops after Chernobyl due to consumer reluctance and when the UK joined the single market in 1990 pretty well vanished completely.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,866
15 Oct 2020 #847
Yes there used to be lots of 'Krakus' goods. ..lovely jam etc
OP pawian 176 | 14,299
22 Oct 2020 #848
I am sure we talked about tongues/ozory about two weeks ago. But I can`t find the discussion in which most people were disgusted. Including maf.

So, maf, if you cook ozory properly, they don`t remind you of flaki. They are pure meat, have a look. In the dish below, I boiled them and then fried them in batter. They were crispy but soft inside. Delicious.





mafketis 24 | 9,097
22 Oct 2020 #849
maf, if you cook ozory properly, they don`t remind you of flaki

I was okay with the taste and I've even had ozory a time or two since.... it was the _texture_ the feeling of biting into a tongue that grossed me out. Imagine you've been at the dentist and your whole mouth is numb and you bite your tongue but don't feel pain - that's what it was like. Once I cut it into teeny tiny pieces it was okay.
Chemikiem 7 | 2,396
6 Nov 2020 #850
most people were disgusted.

Not me. I had tongue in Poland and really liked it. Never tried them in batter though, not sure about that....
Atch 17 | 3,344
7 Nov 2020 #851
I had tongue in Poland and really liked it

Tongue used to be a very common cold meat in the UK, do you remember ham and tongue sandwiches??

I boiled them and then fried them in batter.

That looks more like breadcrumbs, not batter. God, you Poles can't keep away from the frying pan and the old bułka tarta. Even cauliflower gets that treatment! For tongue, I take the whole thing, pop it in a pot with a tiny drop of water, a bay leaf and a few ziele angielski and black peppercorns, then let it cook very slowy over the lowest heat until it's very tender. Allow to cool a bit and cut into very thin slices. Use it for sandwiches or eat it with spuds and surówki.
jon357 63 | 15,607
7 Nov 2020 #852
Allow to cool a bit and cut into very thin slices.

Do you press it overnight?
Atch 17 | 3,344
7 Nov 2020 #853
Do you know what Jon, it never occurred to me! I must try it.
jon357 63 | 15,607
7 Nov 2020 #854
It was always done that way back home.

I'm not a fan of tongue, personally. Haslet though, is a different thing!
OP pawian 176 | 14,299
7 Nov 2020 #855
until it's very tender.

Exactly .And then I fried it.
Chemikiem 7 | 2,396
8 Nov 2020 #856
do you remember ham and tongue sandwiches??

I don't Atch, but they sound nice :) In our house we had to suffer the dreaded luncheon meat sandwices. And don't get me started on Spam....I feel sure there is a vile Polish equivalent.....

Haslet though, is a different thing!

Now I do remember that. Not entirely sure what it contained but it tasted of stuffing to me. I really liked it.

Exactly .And then I fried it.

I'm really not sure about the need to fry it to be honest. Typically it's a cold cut. Is it commonly fried in Poland or is that just your preference?
OP pawian 176 | 14,299
8 Nov 2020 #857
I'm really not sure about the need to fry it to be honest.

To make it crispy which is my fav style.
Chemikiem 7 | 2,396
8 Nov 2020 #858
Think I'll give that one a miss. I'm not that keen on fried food, too often it turns out to be greasy and not crispy.........
OP pawian 176 | 14,299
15 Nov 2020 #859
Phew, I have hust finished making gołąbki - cabbage meat parcels - and put them into the pot to boil. I used the whole leaves from my own fermented cabbage. Whenever I eat gołąbki in Poland, they are always wrapped in fresh leaves while I hate boiled cabbage. So this time I wanted to try out a new recipe.

Tomorrow we`ll check out the result. I had been too optimistic - I had believed I would be able to cook them for Sunday dinner. No way.

Photos soon.
mafketis 24 | 9,097
16 Nov 2020 #860
gołąbki - cabbage meat parcels

The usual expression is 'cabbage rolls' as in this immortal hit song:

youtube.com/watch?v=YzCPTsVtmAw&t=53s
Atch 17 | 3,344
16 Nov 2020 #861
.And then I fried it.

That's a pity because tongue is a relatively lean and healthy form of red meat. You do a lot of frying Paw; do you use smalec?

I had believed I would be able to cook them for Sunday dinner. No way.

Now I know I'm going to sound like a pain in the nether portions (so what's new!) but I can't understand the fuss about making gołąbki. They're quite easy to make and although they're a bit labour intensive you can make and cook a huge pot of them within about three hours. Anyway, here's a glimpse of my own :))





OP pawian 176 | 14,299
16 Nov 2020 #862
The usual expression is 'cabbage rolls'

Yes, you are probably right, yet if you google parcels, you can still find a few links. E..g, from the UK. :):)

asdagoodliving.co.uk/food/recipes/cabbage-parcels

You do a lot of frying Paw;

Yes, I do coz I am addicted to crispy and crunchy textures.

do you use smalec?

Yes, but not for frying - I use it instead of butter on bread - with skwarki - we talked about it in the theme thread.

within about three hours.

Exactly! Two hours too long to make it on time for a 2.30. pm Sunday dinner. hahahaha That is why I was still cooking it at night - Sundays are quite busy for me - classes with kids/mass service/ charity work/ preparation for Monday online teaching etc.

Your parcels look great, the same as mine except the colour of cabbage wrapping - mine was more yellowish after fermentation.

So, the results were excellent - all my family praised my parcels. I even noticed they didn`t see the difference in taste - some of the parcels with buckwheat stuffing were for me - but nobody complained. :):):)
mafketis 24 | 9,097
17 Nov 2020 #863
here's a glimpse of my own

They look yummy! I love the color and they do look like parcels.... (more than one or two I've gotten from InPost).

Are those the end gołąbki? I've noticed that the first leaves end up being kind of awkward because they're so big and the last ones take on odd shapes as the leaves get smaller...

My ultimate multi-regional-cultural ones would use pickled leaves (like Romania) barley (... or buckwheat??!) instead of rice (found here and there in various places) and would have a lot of paprika in the sauce and be served with sour cream on top (both as in Hungary).
Chemikiem 7 | 2,396
17 Nov 2020 #864
they're a bit labour intensive

Exactly! I love gołąbki but have only made them on couple of occasions. If time is not a problem then great, but after a day at work I'm not going to spend hours making them. Yours look very tasty!
Atch 17 | 3,344
17 Nov 2020 #865
I've noticed that the first leaves end up being kind of awkward

The trick is buying a cabbage that's not too big. There is less difference between the larger and smaller leaves in a medium sized cabbage. However, recently at Biedronka they've started stocking a special cabbage that was obviously cultivated for making gołąbki and it's really much easier to manage. I was making them this morning so you'll find some photos below! This cabbage has two great advantages. Firstly, the difference in the sizes of the large and small leaves is not as great, secondly, the leaves are much softer and more flexible so it hardly needs any time at all in the boiling water, the leaves come away easily and are very easy to work with for wrapping. It seems to avoid that thing of the very thick, veiny leaves as you get closer to the end.

I've put a photo showing the largest leaf alongside one of the smallest, to show you the difference and a pic of the gołąbki in the pot where I purposely arranged them with the one made from the largest leaf in the centre and the smallest one is on the top right. The final pic is my well earned cup of tea and shortbread fingers which I enjoyed after my labours ;)

This cabbage is quite pricey compared to the standard white cabbage which costs 1.99 per kilo while the 'fancy' one is 4.99 BUT it's a lot lighter in weight probably because it doesn't have the big stalk in the middle, and the standard cabbage is really heavy so there isn't much difference in the end.

Your recipe sounds delicious, I usually add a bit of cayenne pepper to mine :)









OP pawian 176 | 14,299
18 Nov 2020 #866
So, I prepared my cabbage parcels in two versions: one with buckwheat and pickled leaves for me and the other with rice/barley kasha in fresh leaves for others. But later they all got mixed up both variants went down very well with all the eaters in my family.

It was the first time I ate that cabbage wrapping - I had always left it on the plate before.
I used 1.5 kg of meat and the last parcels were eaten today.
I managed to impress my wife. Neither the first nor the last time.









OP pawian 176 | 14,299
18 Nov 2020 #867
I have already set another cabbage to pickle in the stoneware pot. This time it is going to ferment for 4 weeks.
Mr Grunwald 28 | 1,852
19 Nov 2020 #868
I love cabbage!
Been using cabbage with meat to make some form of gołąbki in east-Asian style as I found the recipe from a YouTube video.

I prepare the cabbage by boiling it first in like 10-15 minutes to make it soft, while I do that I crush open an egg, mix the egg with meat, pepper (pieprz not chili or paprika) and pre-chopped tomatoes (instead of soy sauce) mix it together and form cabbage dumplings which I steam cook in 25 minutes.

Put sea salt on them and Dijon mustard after it's prepared so that it won't be too dry cause of the sea salt.
OP pawian 176 | 14,299
14 Dec 2020 #869
This time it is going to ferment for 4 weeks.

This smell in my room is amazing. hahaha

Our farm produce continued:

The first photo features our pepper, potatoes and baby corn. The second - potatoes, green beans and side salad. The third - green onion. The fourth - leeks and red chicory.









OP pawian 176 | 14,299
30 Dec 2020 #870
too often it turns out to be greasy and not crispy.........

Check this pork chop - it was definitely very crispy, not greasy. Chickpea next to it - not my fav coz it is too dry to me.





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