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Polish dishes with foreign origin in the name


Bobko 25 | 1,995
27 Feb 2024 #31
reminds me of chinse stuff.

Which is why I think it came to us from the Steppe nomads.
jon357 74 | 21,980
27 Feb 2024 #32
Pelmeni

We have a pelmenitsa.

Easy to make but definitely a 'now and again' dish. I read once that people in the frozen east pile them up outside their hovel and chip blocks off the pile throughout the winter.

Not very Polish though.
Bobko 25 | 1,995
27 Feb 2024 #33
We have a pelmenitsa

What the hell is that? Sounds like something you would use to make pelmeni, but I've never seen such a magical implement. It's why I never bother with making them, because it's such a pain in the ass.

I read once that people in the frozen east pile them up outside their hovel

I don't see why not, especially pre-refrigeration days.
jon357 74 | 21,980
27 Feb 2024 #34
Sounds like something you would use to make pelmeni

Yes handy things if you want to make pelmeni however I use mine mostly for standing hot things on.
Alien 20 | 4,925
27 Feb 2024 #35
In Poland we still have lazy dumplings( which are actually noodles). I remember such a joke.
What Poland looks like from a bird's eye view. Like a plate of dumplings, half russian, half lazy.
Of course, this is a joke from the times of the Polish People's Republic.
jon357 74 | 21,980
27 Feb 2024 #36
dumplings

Best just to call them pierogi in English. The word has come into the language like pizza, quiche or paella.

Calling them dumplings is a little bit "I am Agnes and this is Gregory".
jon357 74 | 21,980
29 Feb 2024 #37
And of course Sajgonki have been around so long in Poland that they're part of the culinary landscape.
Alien 20 | 4,925
29 Feb 2024 #38
And of course Sajgonki

I like ready-made ones, e.g. from Biedronka.
jon357 74 | 21,980
29 Feb 2024 #39
I like ready-made ones

They're OK though I tend to buy more traditional krokiety from there.

I've tended to avoid Saigonki after that scandal just south of Warsaw where a wholesaler got in trouble for sourcing their raw materials from an animal sanctuary.

Lots of places have urban legends about things like this (every single small town in Britain has a Chinese takeaway which was allegedly found with half an Alsatian and a human hand in the freezer) however this was confirmed, reported on the TV news and resulted in a prosecution. It was the animal sanctuary who first alerted Sanepid.
Alien 20 | 4,925
29 Feb 2024 #40
raw materials from an animal sanctuary

Fortunately, I only buy those with vegetables.
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
3 Mar 2024 #41
In restaurants I always get it with pickled cucumbers, not tomatoes.

Yes, it is a popular variety......

Here is a current pic of the dish from the place where I ate it first time in mid 1990s. Today they serve it with mild pickled peppers while 30 years ago they added hot pepperoni peppers.



OP pawian 222 | 24,343
9 Mar 2024 #42
Chlodnik Litewski is one of the nicest things in Polish cuisine.

The only thing I like about Lithuanian Cold Soup is its colour - it reminds me of blueberry icecream (made of/with Polish blueberries, of course).

The remaining qualities of the soup are pathetic - it is very thin, I mean unfattening and cold. Soups should be served hot. In pre heated bowls, like in Ireland!!

Crazy dish!


  • Soup

  • Ice cream
jon357 74 | 21,980
9 Mar 2024 #43
Lithuanian Cold Soup

Chlodnik Litewski?

Delicious however the one in the photo is far too dark
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
9 Mar 2024 #44
too dark

Made with/from seasoned beetroots which stayed in the ground longer than usual - then they get dark. Don`t reject such soups - still fine for your palate and other organs. Trust me - I am a beetroot grower.
jon357 74 | 21,980
10 Mar 2024 #45
then they get dark

Remember it darkens overnight; better to use less rather than more to keep the delicate flavour and colour.
Novichok 4 | 7,804
10 Mar 2024 #46
It's flavor and color. You don't need "u". Learn English before you post.
jon357 74 | 21,980
10 Mar 2024 #47
It's chłodnik Litewskie.

We are discussing food not your non-standard spellings of flavour and colour.
mafketis 37 | 10,846
10 Mar 2024 #48
standard spellings of flavour and colour

ar flavor and color.... Webster didn't go _neerly_ far enuff.
jon357 74 | 21,980
10 Mar 2024 #49
ar flavor and color

If t'noorth n t' saarth n Ingland wo t split laak Czechs n t' Slovaks wid afte gaw f'netic wi' t'nyew lngwidge.
mafketis 37 | 10,846
10 Mar 2024 #50
Ie dont cair about british usage just amerikan
jon357 74 | 21,980
10 Mar 2024 #51
Webster? 'S a yokshir neim. Worra tretr t t'owd cvntry
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
10 Mar 2024 #52
Litewskie

Litewski. :)):)
jon357 74 | 21,980
10 Mar 2024 #53
Autokorekt 🦍
mafketis 37 | 10,846
10 Mar 2024 #54
Autokorekt

More like auto co-wrecked!

get it? get it? ha ha ha ha ha ha ha ha.... I slay myself sometimes.....
mafketis 37 | 10,846
10 Mar 2024 #55
Has anyone here mentioned Amerykany ?

A Polish cookie type thing, usually, not always, with a white sugar glaze on one side. Not sure why they're called that. They seem vaguely related to sugar cookies but those are thinner and usually not glazed. Also unlike sugar cookies they often have a strong ammonia smell (and are sometimes called amionaczki according to a friend)

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sugar_cookie



Lenka 5 | 3,442
10 Mar 2024 #56
@mafketis
Now you hit nostalgia button hard! I have to make sure I eat some next time in Poland.what would be the best place to buy them... Back in the day they ruled in the kiosks/ shops next to schools ...
Atch 22 | 4,117
11 Mar 2024 #57
You don't need "u"

You do if you're properly literate. The etymology of words should be respected, not simplified. The dumbing down of everything ........... make things simple and people become simpletons.
mafketis 37 | 10,846
11 Mar 2024 #58
You do if you're properly literate.

enthusiast of British spelling =/= 'properly literate'

etymology of words should be respected, not simplified

You must hate this then....

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Caighde%C3%A1n_Oifigi%C3%BAil
Atch 22 | 4,117
11 Mar 2024 #59
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/An_Caighde%C3%A1n_Oifigi%C3%BAil

Yes, I do. It also meant the end of the lovely old Irish script in which people used to read and write the Irish language.



jon357 74 | 21,980
11 Mar 2024 #60
the lovely old Irish script

I remember seeing a passport that had that script.

It was on the postage stamps too as I remember.


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