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Polish dishes with foreign origin in the name


mafketis 37 | 10,846
11 Mar 2024 #61
lovely old Irish script

I had a couple of books once with some pages printed in old Irish and others in modern script. It does raise the question of how much is it a separate script and how much is it just a font....
Crnogorac3 4 | 856
12 Mar 2024 #62
Sounds like something you would use to make pelmeni

@Bobko

I am sitting currently at a recently opened Russian restaurant by the Danube, what do you suggest is good to try from these Russian dishes?

ruski
Alien 20 | 4,925
12 Mar 2024 #63
Russian restaurant

Are these prices in rubles?
Crnogorac3 4 | 856
12 Mar 2024 #64
No the prices are in Serbian Dinars, the Russian restaurant is located in Zemun

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zemun

not far from Hotel Jugoslavija

en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hotel_Jugoslavija

I started off with some Borscht, it was very refreshing, it opened my apetite, after that I had to have some Pelmeni - it's simply fantastic.

pelmeni

For desert I ordered Medovik, a cake with honey, very delicious.

medovik
Atch 22 | 4,117
12 Mar 2024 #65
It does raise the question of how much is it a separate script and how much is it just a font....

Not just a font in my opinion as it existed centuries before printing and spread from Ireland to England. It was developed by the Irish monks to transcribe Latin into Irish so they created the diacritics they needed to render the Gaelic eg. the dot over the b to represent the v sound. Also the monks created the spaces between words system that renders text more readable. They started it around the 7th century and it spread to the rest of Europe later.
mafketis 37 | 10,846
12 Mar 2024 #66
Not just a font in my opinion

I understand your viewpoint but do fonts merely substitute letters or are they granted separate places in unicode? Let me check... off to vicipéid (shouldn't that be bhicipéid?)

The answer is ..... no....

"Unicode treats the Gaelic script as a font variant of the Latin alphabet. A lowercase insular g (ᵹ) was added in version 4.1 as part of the Phonetic Extensions block...."

Though I do see that unicode does have over-dotted letters: Ḃḃ Ċċ Ḋḋ Ḟḟ Ġġ Ṁṁ Ṗṗ Ṡṡ Ṫṫ

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gaelic_type
Alien 20 | 4,925
12 Mar 2024 #67
some Borscht

White or red?
Atch 22 | 4,117
12 Mar 2024 #68
"Unicode treats the Gaelic script as a font variant of the Latin alphabet.

I know and that's a bone of contention for some of us :)

These images might interest you. One is of a letter typed on a very rare thing, an old typewriter with the cló gaelach font and the other a child's school exercise book from around 1920. The writing is so beautiful.





OP pawian 222 | 24,343
12 Mar 2024 #69
Has anyone here mentioned Amerykany ?

Amasing!! I have never heard this name. In which part of Poland is it popular???

Back in the day they ruled in the kiosks/ shops next to schools ...

Not next to my school. We only had a bar with communist hot dogs which were equally delicious. :):):)
Lenka 5 | 3,442
12 Mar 2024 #70
I am a bit younger than you :)

But I was raised in Silesia and they were common back in the day. Didn't see them for a while
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
12 Mar 2024 #71
But I was raised in Silesia

OK, a Silesian tradition. We are close in actual distance but still hugely different. :):):)
mafketis 37 | 10,846
12 Mar 2024 #72
In which part of Poland is it popular???

I don't know if they're that popular... but I've seen them in Wielkopolska often enough. I've always wondered where the name came from....
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
12 Mar 2024 #73
but I've seen them in Wielkopolska

First Silesia, then Greater Poland. Why does Lesser Poland always trail behind???? That Goralenvolk!
Alien 20 | 4,925
12 Mar 2024 #74
Why does Lesser Poland always trail behind????

Well, they have the Wawel Dragon and Lech.
Ironside 53 | 12,412
12 Mar 2024 #75
and cretins like pawian.
Alien 20 | 4,925
12 Mar 2024 #76
like pawian

Is Pawian from Małopolska?
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
12 Mar 2024 #77
like pawian

Exactly! I am so proud to be had by them!!! Ha!
Ironside 53 | 12,412
12 Mar 2024 #78
Is Pawian from Małopolska?

Probably but in real fact, he is from the pits of hell.
Lech if you mean beer is from Wielkopolska.
Where pawian comes from they drink dirty water infected by flays called muszynianka.
Alien 20 | 4,925
13 Mar 2024 #79
Lech if you mean beer is from Wielkopolska

Actually, I meant the Lech in Wawel.
Crnogorac3 4 | 856
17 Mar 2024 #80
White or red?

It was white Borscht.

r1

2

Interestingly the owner of this restaurant by the Danube is a Russian while the cook is Ukrainian. Which only shows that normal people can cooperate.

r3

@Bobko & Velund what other Russian dishes do you recommend? I've tried the Pelmeni so far, when served hot and with sour cream it melts in the mouth, I also enjoyed Medovik the honey cheesecake.
Alien 20 | 4,925
17 Mar 2024 #81
Placki okrugli od krompira - sounds good too
Bobko 25 | 1,995
18 Mar 2024 #82
what other Russian dishes do you recommend?

A lot of food that is very popular in Russia is actually Central Asian or from the Caucasus.

Try:

1) Samsy - the samosa's central Asian ancestor. Filled with meat and onions.
2) Plov - rice and meat and vegetables. Different recipes, Uzbek plov is considered the best by many.
3) Khachapuri - a kind of Georgian pizza.

Out of purely Russian dishes:

1) Okroshka
2) Solyanka
3) Bliny with meat or mushrooms
4) Uha
5) Schii
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
18 Mar 2024 #83
2) Solyanka

In 1970s I learnt German at school, later uni and at home. We used books published in East Germany. Those German characters in their dialogues considered it their fave soup or even dish. The word gave me a great shock - what was I learning from a German publication ? German or Russian??? Amasing propaganda! :):):)

4) Uha

In 1980s, during an acute economic crisis, canned uha fish soup made in the USSR was available in Polish shops. Not bad.
mafketis 37 | 10,846
18 Mar 2024 #84
books published in East Germany. Those German characters in their dialogues considered it their fave soup

Polish textbooks for English speaking learners produced during the PRL were weirdly full of teachers of russian... you'd think it was one of the most common jobs...
Bobko 25 | 1,995
18 Mar 2024 #85
considered it their fave soup or even dish

It is definitely my favorite soup. Not sure if "dish".

Also, very easy to create.
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
18 Mar 2024 #86
very easy to create.

According to my childhood imagination, judging by its name, I believed the soup is just salted water. Salt in Polish is sól so soljanka sounds like salt soup. I couldn`t believe Germans loved such primitive dish.
Bobko 25 | 1,995
18 Mar 2024 #87
@pawian

Salt is sol' in Russian as well.

Honestly, not sure why it's called that.

If something has a lot of different things in it, Russians can call it a «сборная солянка». For example, if a team is made of students from different schools, you could call it a sort of solyanka.

So... it really means "a dish with a bunch of different sh!t thrown into it".

For example, look at this solyanka recipe which uses smoked meats. There's a billion items there:



Alien 20 | 4,925
19 Mar 2024 #89
Eurocrem & plazma

I also have Euro and a plasma (TV). 🤔
Crnogorac3 4 | 856
30 Mar 2024 #90
1) Okroshka

okroshka

Thanks for the recommendation Bobko, I really enjoyed it. 👌 What I like about Russian food it's not really too heavy, you can immediately order another dish or go back to work. You don't feel sleepy.

1

This is from the Irish festival, I got to try the Irish banana bread & carrot cake. Very delicious. 👍


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