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Polish dishes with foreign origin in the name


pawian 222 | 24,343
15 May 2023 #1
There are a few of them - they allude to foreign origin but strangely, are completely unknown in the countries which are refered to in the dish name. Amasing.

Beans ala Bretonne - fasolka po bretońsku. Big beans in thick tomato sauce with pieces of sausage or bacon. Yummy!

Bretagne is a province in France where they don`t know such a dish.



Feniks
15 May 2023 #2
France where they don`t know such a dish.

Actually they do but it doesn't contain sausage. Basically beans in tomato sauce:

marieclaire.fr/cuisine/haricots-blancs-a-la-bretonne,1205852.asp
jon357 74 | 21,980
15 May 2023 #3
Chlodnik Litewski and placki po Węgiersku come to kind.

Chlodnik is one of the nicest things in Polish cuisine.

And of course what in Poland is called barszcz Ukraińskie is the Polish version, quite specifically different from borscht in Ukraine.

There are a few others too. I can think of several more.

I'll try not to mention pierogi r*skie...
Alien 20 | 4,925
15 May 2023 #4
Kołduny litewskie or Pawian's Karp po żydowsku.
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
15 May 2023 #5
but it doesn't contain sausage. Basically beans in tomato sauce:

With or without sausage, it is practically the same. Amasing! The Polish net refuses to acknowledge the presence of such a dish in Bretagne, France. :):):)
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
16 May 2023 #6
Jon, I will soon reply to your post but let me first finish with the dishes unknown in the country which the name suggests.

they allude to foreign origin but strangely, are completely unknown in the countries

Herring ala Japanese - pickled herring, an egg, peas, pickled cucumber, onion, mayonaise. Once a very popular appetizer with vodka.

If you google śledź po japońsku, you will find tens of different arrangements of the ingredients. Here is just one of them:

and the recipe:
swojskiejedzonko.com/2017/12/sledz-po-japonsku.html Very easy.



Miloslaw 19 | 4,856
16 May 2023 #7
I will have to try herring again as I haven't tried it since I was a kid and it made me feel sick.
Tastes change as you get older and I like most seafood now.
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
16 May 2023 #8
Tastes change as you get older and I like most seafood now.

Yes, but when trying herring, choose its pickled version in which fishbones are soft coz if not, they practically make the dish inedible. Crisp fried version also greatly deals with fishbones but only in small fish..
Miloslaw 19 | 4,856
16 May 2023 #9
Yes, but when trying herring, choose its pickled version

I will take your advice.
It was the fishbones that made me feel sick as a kid, like eating thick hair......
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
16 May 2023 #10
me feel sick as a kid, like eating thick hair.....

Yes, I hate them, too. I can`t forget the incident in my childhood when a fishbone got stuck in my throat and nobody and nothing could help for a few hours. I was really scared I would have to go to hospital for an operation. :):):)
Miloslaw 19 | 4,856
16 May 2023 #11
when a fishbone got stuck in my throat

Yes, truly disgusting and possibly scary too.
jon357 74 | 21,980
17 May 2023 #12
Herring ala Japanese

That sounds quite nice.

Nicer than ryba po grecku which I'm not fond of.
Feniks
17 May 2023 #13
Chlodnik is one of the nicest things in Polish cuisine.

I've never actually tried that.

Herring ala Japanese - pickled herring, an egg, peas, pickled cucumber, onion, mayonaise

No, I don't fancy that. I wouldn't want the egg and the peas in it. I've read about this dish before though. It grew popular after the end of WW2. I think it also used to be served with potato salad.
gumishu 13 | 6,140
17 May 2023 #14
ryba po grecku

ryba po grecku - nom nom :)
OP pawian 222 | 24,343
1 Jan 2024 #15
grecku -

Fish ala Greek was never my cup of tea. I wonder why. Probably it is so messy on the plate with all those veg in tomato sauce heaped on the fish that I have always feared choking on a fishbone which I am likely to overlook in this chaos.



OP pawian 222 | 24,343
24 Feb 2024 #16
A few days ago I read a blog by a Polish woman who married a Hungarian and settled in Budapest. She claims that the dish known in Poland as potato pancakes ala Hungarian doesn`t exist in her new country.

Polish dish is served with meat gravy containing large chunks of pork. I like the version with the addition of hot pickled pepperoni peppers best:



jon357 74 | 21,980
24 Feb 2024 #17
That pic looks a lot prettier than the normal ones you see. I always think it should have more paprika in.
Alien 20 | 4,925
24 Feb 2024 #18
potato pancakes ala Hungarian

In restaurants I always get it with pickled cucumbers, not tomatoes.
jon357 74 | 21,980
24 Feb 2024 #19
pickled

Gherkins?

That is certainly more normal as an accompaniment.
Alien 20 | 4,925
24 Feb 2024 #20
Gherkins?

Nie korniszony tylko kiszone.
jon357 74 | 21,980
24 Feb 2024 #21
tylko kiszone

That's what I mean.

Not the tiny cornichons which go best with pate (especially rillettes) anyway.
mafketis 37 | 10,846
24 Feb 2024 #22
the dish known in Poland as potato pancakes ala Hungarian doesn`t exist

I could have told you that....

How old is the Polish dish placki węgierskie?

I had assumed it was.... inspired by hortobagyi palacsinta (Hortobagy naleśniki) but I just read that's not old and only dates from 1958....

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nale%C5%9Bniki_Hortob%C3%A1gy
Alien 20 | 4,925
27 Feb 2024 #23
Dumplings stuffed with potatoes and white cheese, i.e. "russian dumplings" (pierogi ruskie).
mafketis 37 | 10,846
27 Feb 2024 #24
"russian dumplings" (pierogi ruskie).

Actually that should be "ruthenian dumplings" (ruthenisch)

ruski for 'russian' is sort of rude... but it also means 'ruthenian' which is where they are from (and not russia at all).
Ironside 53 | 12,413
27 Feb 2024 #25
but it also means 'ruthenian' which is where they are from (

They are not of foreign origin in the name. Ruskie explains from Provincia Ruska, an administrative district of the Polish Kingdom. More or less antebellum Wojewodztwo Lwowskie.
Bobko 25 | 1,995
27 Feb 2024 #26
Dumplings stuffed with potatoes and white cheese, i.e. "russian dumplings" (pierogi ruskie).

We call those vareniki. True Russian dumplings, are more circular in shape, and made only with ground meat. We call those - pelmeni.

Vareniki (crescent shaped pelmeni with potatoes instead of meat), are traditionally considered a Ukrainian recipe. They're also sometimes made with cherries, or something else sweet.

In the picture below, pelmeni are on the right, and vareniki on the left.

My theory, based on nothing, is that these come into Russian and Ukrainian cuisine from Asia. Maybe from the Tatars, or some of the other Steppe peoples. Looks too much like their dumplings to be a coincidence.



Ironside 53 | 12,413
27 Feb 2024 #27
pelmeni.

Are they not served baked?
jon357 74 | 21,980
27 Feb 2024 #28
pierogi ruskie

A few shops that sell them and restaurants that serve them now call them pierogi Ukrainskie.
Bobko 25 | 1,995
27 Feb 2024 #29
Are they not served baked?

You can bake them. You can fry them. You can boil them.

Most people buy them frozen at the store, and just boil them like macaroni. Ten minutes, and you've got yourself a dinner. Add sour cream, or maybe even ketchup if you're autistic.

In a restaurant, they'll usually be swimming around in their own broth, in a little clay pot like in the photo above.

1) Fried Pelmeni
2) Baked Pelmeni
3) Orthodox Christian Pelmeni







Ironside 53 | 12,413
27 Feb 2024 #30
call them pierogi Ukrainskie.

Those people are the same kind of morons that say w Ukrainie rather than - na Ukrainie.
Don't know anything even their language.
---

Orthodox Christian Pelmeni

Looks interesting and reminds me of chinse stuff.


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