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Polack/American Polonia/Plastic Pole "culture"


Torq
31 Oct 2010 #151
So, where am I wrong?

Couple of posts ago you said...

PiS voters are supportive of the Polonia, yet everyone else dislikes them

...which is complete and utter nonsense.

Generally, if what you post mirrors your knowledge of Poland after a couple of years
spent here, then I have to say that you wasted your time and learnt nothing.

Any foreigner, given 3 issues of Gazeta Wyborcza and being allowed to watch TVN
for two hours, will know as much about Poland as you do (or maybe you're being
depressingly shallow on purpose - maybe this thread is some sort of provocation?)

Which party tends to throw around "PROUD PATRIOTIC POLSKA"? It's certainly not PO or the SLD. Both of those parties also don't have a leader who seems to be desperate to become some sort of martyr.

*sighs*

Make it two issues of GW and one hour of TVN.
Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
31 Oct 2010 #152
Typical Plastic Polonia response

awwwwww did I strike a cord ?? cause you said your dont want to be a old man
teaching? whhaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa go change your diaper..

Anyway, if you had actually read the thread, you'd know that I was talking about teaching professionally. Nothing to do with sitting on "Jaja's" knee listening to boring stories about how he ran away from Poland in 1919 because he was such a patriot.

mine neither, I didnt get that chance to sit on their knee, they all died minus one before
I was even thought of.

and they all came long before 1919... but what would you know , I guess you think
everyone who immigrated left when it was bad.. no one left to make a better life
like you did when you left your wonderful home to move to poland right..

yeah, one track mind you have.. lol.. what a good guy you are. lol not.
who cares anyway.. your claim to be holy holds no merit with me.

what really cracks me up is that people in general have to pay taxes in every country
they live. you use this as your excuse.. pathetic your not polish, your a citizen who is
a wannabe.. unfortunately you will never be.. but you can dreammmmmmmmmmm
dream of how you want a jaja like all of ours.. but never will have one, cause your just
a skirt with a bagpipe trying to pretend you are polish.. and guess what?

all the vodka in the world wont help you.. ha ha ha.. lol
again, I say, what a waste..
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
31 Oct 2010 #153
If you're true to Poland, you live here and contribute to the country. End of story.

In America people have two or more countries, America and whatever countries their ancestors came from, unless they are Native American.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
31 Oct 2010 #154
If you're true to Poland, you live here and contribute to the country. End of story.

That's a bit of a ranty thing to say.
Who died and made you supreme master of who people are? :)

People can of course be Polish outside of Poland.

Nothing to do with sitting on "Jaja's" knee listening to boring stories about how he ran away from Poland in 1919 because he was such a patriot.

So when your little ones sit on your knee and you tell them about how you ran away from Scotland, what will you say exactly? ;p

This is just your little rant thread Delphi :)
It's amusing, slightly insulting and sometimes has an element of truth, I'll give you that but it is not the best thought out thread, although it fits the PF criteria of broad generalisations :P
guesswho 4 | 1,289
31 Oct 2010 #155
In America people have two or more countries, America and whatever countries their ancestors came from, unless they are Native American.

True, however usually what people say here is "I"m an American but my ancestors came from ........."
This being Polish seems to be still very important to many of you, for how many I can't tell as where I live, I've never met anyone with Polish roots. I'm sure there are some of you around but I've just never met any. I'd love to ask you how you guys manage to live with those split feelings of being both, Americans and Poles at the same time? It's probably easy for those of you who were born in Poland but I wonder how the American born feel about it. I can imagine, it must be pretty confusing sometimes. I'm defending you on PF because from the Polish point of view, they should be actually proud of you for fighting for everything Polish in the US instead to bash you all the time but from the American point of view, I'd love to know where you actually stand?
Teffle 22 | 1,321
31 Oct 2010 #156
True, however usually what people say here is "I"m an American but my ancestors came from ........."

Yeah - you've hit the nail on the head. Most Americans I've met define themselves this way. So it's probably nothing to do with Polonia at all really - the apparent interest/connection/fixation call it what you will, with the ancestral country, is porobably pretty common in the US generally.
1jola 14 | 1,879
31 Oct 2010 #157
Since you mentioned 1919 and Polonia that can do nothing, let me show you wrong. This shows not only Polish unity, but Slavic unity as well.

The Foreign Language Bureau of the Government Loan Organization of the United States Treasury in a report of June 4, 1919 states:

"The demonstrations of May 21st, participated in by the Jewish people all through the United States in the form of a public protest against the persecution of the Jews in Poland, has produced on the part of the Polish population in the U. S. A. (nearly 4,000,000) a well managed, quietly conducted commercial and financial boycott of all Jewish merchants and vendors.

Both sides of the controversy have had ample public hearing in the Press of the U. S. A. The Poles privately maintain that the Jews are disappointed in the development of Poland into a free and independent Nation as the ambition of Jewish leaders for many generations has been to make of Poland a Jewish economic state commanding the commercial and financial channels of Eastern Europe, under a German protectorate.

- - - - - - - - -

At this point, the document break off. There have been published citations of this document which indicate that it is of greater length and scope than the above reproduced materials. A search is being conducted for the lost portions. If and when these materials are located, they will be posted on PAPUREC's website.

papurec.org/fundamental/PowerAims6.html
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
31 Oct 2010 #158
It's a matter of last names. Murkowski is so obviously Polish, people are going to see that name and think "ah, someone who's Polish" even if they aren't actually from Poland. There's a guy with a Polish last name running for lt governor in my state as an independent whom I am voting for just because he has a Polish last name like me and the other two candidates don't (I don't agree much with either of the other candidates on issues, either).

It's the same with names like McClure. People see it and know it's either Irish or Scottish. People with names like Mueller are expected to be German while names like Yamamoto are obviously Japanese. People call you out and say, "ah, a Japanese name!" or whatever here. In America, the surname means more than anything else.
OP delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
31 Oct 2010 #159
From another source comes the information that other racial groups, namely, Russians, Ukrainians, Roumanians, Lithuanians, Czecho-Slovaks, Jugo-Slavs, Findlanders, Letts, all of Slavic origin will join in this Jewish boycott. Operations for management of same are now under way."

Wow. That's very, very interesting stuff - especially this part. Calling Romanians, "Finlanders" and "Letts" Slavic is probably about as offensive as it gets these days, but yet - it shows you a different time.

Now - did these events actually happen, or is it just scaremongering/hysteria on both sides?
guesswho 4 | 1,289
31 Oct 2010 #160
Very often those names don't have anything to do with ones origin at all. I've met a guy in Germany with an obvious Polish name and when I asked him if he's Polish, he got mad at me. Same in Poland, many people have German names but claim to be Polish.

Besides, in the states when the immigrants entered America and had hard to pronounce, last names, they were given English names very often, for example, a German guy who's famous in NC for gold digging, Johannes Reith, was named John Reed etc.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
31 Oct 2010 #161
I find it so funny the amount of so called Poles in America who consider Poland as their home and yet have not set a foot there! The fact they have the right to vote should be illegal, the fact that they have any word on their so called homeland is laughable! "I'm Polish but yeah, i couldnt even point it out on a map, let alone want to live there!"
Pinching Pete - | 558
31 Oct 2010 #162
I find it so funny

Conversely, I find it funny the amount of threads on PFs (started by Non-Americans.. you know people who've NEVER SET FOOT IN THE US) .. about the US. : /
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
31 Oct 2010 #163
I find it funny the amount of threads on PFs

well i have been in the US, and lived many years in Poland. Then again this is Polishforums (even the admin cant say he has ever been in the country) and not the US forums.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
31 Oct 2010 #164
I find it so funny the amount of so called Poles in America who consider Poland as their home and yet have not set a foot there! The fact they have the right to vote should be illegal, the fact that they have any word on their so called homeland is laughable! "I'm Polish but yeah, i couldnt even point it out on a map, let alone want to live there!"

I don't consider it my home since I don't live there, but I am definitely Polish and have been told I am Polish my entire life.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
31 Oct 2010 #165
but I am definitely Polish

Have you ever lived in Poland???
MediaWatch 10 | 945
31 Oct 2010 #166
depressingly shallow on purpose - maybe this thread is some sort of provocation?)

I agree. No doubt he is being provokative and he barely knows anything about Poland for all the time he supposedly lived there. It seems like he has some kind of vendetta against Poles.

He has barely learned anything about Poland in 2 years. After 2 years of living in Poland, delphiandomine can only barely speak Polish.

Either he's not too smart or he just doesn't want to learn Polish since he doesn't like the Polish which we can all pretty much see. Just about every other comment of his is an attack or put down on all things Polish.

But I doubt he reads any Polish publications since he only knows like 10 words in Polish. I seriously doubt he even lives in Poland. That's just his act. He reads English language news on Poland and then tries to use that news to make himself look like he is "on the ground in Poland" and an expert on Poland.

I believe he gets most of his English language news from Russian based English news sources like Russian RT news.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
31 Oct 2010 #167
well i have been in the US, and lived many years in Poland. Then again this is Polishforums (even the admin cant say he has ever been in the country) and not the US forums

So you have lived many years in Poland. How many people who know you irl say you are Polish just because you happen to have lived in Poland. They might say you are some English bloke living in Poland. Dude, with me, I actually get called Polish when people see or hear my last name.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
31 Oct 2010 #168
So you have lived many years in Poland. How many people who know you irl say you are Polish just because you happen to have lived in Poland.

None cos im Scottish!

They might say you are some English bloke living in Poland. Dude, with me, I actually get called Polish when people see or hear my last name.

No again, they get to know me and find out i am Scottish. Unlike you who is not Polish, You are just some American claiming to be Polish though no one in this country would consider you Polish.
OP delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
31 Oct 2010 #169
I agree. No doubt he is being provokative and he barely knows anything about Poland for all the time he supposedly lived there. It seems like he has some kind of vendetta against Poles.

Actually, it seems as if YOU are the one obsessed with conducting witch hunts against perceived anti-Polishness. Last time I checked, your type were the ones doing real harm to Poland.

He has barely learned anything about Poland in 2 years. After 2 years of living in Poland, delphiandomine can only barely speak Polish.

Uh, what do you know about my Polish skills? You don't know me, you're just an anonymous internet troll.

I seriously doubt he even lives in Poland. That's just his act. He reads English language news on Poland and then tries to use that news to make himself look like he is "on the ground in Poland" and an expert on Poland.

Actually, that's what the American Polonia do.

And you've been told by a moderator on this forum that I live in Poland, that I associate with Poles and even sorted him out with a place to stay with a Polish friend of mine. What about you? Who can vouch for you, Polack?

I believe he gets most of his English language news from Russian based English news sources like Russian RT news.

Would that be like how you obtained your information about Smolensk by an FSB-funded website?
Pinching Pete - | 558
31 Oct 2010 #170
even the admin cant say he has ever been in the country)

I'm sure he's been to Poland. I have been to the N. West side of Chicago... maybe it's not Poland per se.. but apparently it's pretty damn close.

The US is a VERY young country.. it doesn't have it's own identity yet. It has very tight ethnic groups of Polish, German, Italian, Jew, Black, Southern White, whatever.. Groups with things in common tend to live around each other do business etc. When a Pol-Am talks about being Polish it's usually to distinquish between other Americans. The don't literally see themselves as Polish. I've seen this addressed several times on here.. seemingly to the constant confusion of the wandering limey on here...

.. Who, indeed, shares no blood with the native Pole.
PlasticPole 7 | 2,649
31 Oct 2010 #171
So there ya go, dtaylor, you are a Scottish dude living in Poland. You are living in Poland and all it means is that you are there, doesn't have anything to do with whether you are Polish or not!

But, since America is such a melting pot kinda place, we use descent to help identify ourselves. We use our ethnicity but we still identify ourselves as Americans, nationally. Polish is my ethnicity (because of my surname and since most people are stuck with surnames from their fathers, it's the first thing people notice about them)

Some dude might only be a quarter Italian or Irish but he has that surname so he identifies ethnically with Italians or Irish and might call himself an Italian or Irish American. It's part of American culture to do this because so many of our ancestors migrated to this country from other parts of the world.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
31 Oct 2010 #172
I'm sure he's been to Poland. I have been to the N. West side of Chicago... maybe it's not Poland per se.. but apparently it's pretty damn close.

He has admitted before he hasnt been.

The US is a VERY young country

Agreed, but its the US...

. Who, indeed, shares no blood with the native Pole.

The Polish people?

So there ya go, dtaylor, you are a Scottish dude living in Poland.

No I am not! Get your facts right first...

we use decent to help identify ourselves.

No you didn't, you slaved most people to your country.

Polish is my ethnicity

The spelling of your name doesn't make you Polish...

When a Pol-Am talks about being Polish it's usually to distinquish between other Americans.

You are no different to any other American, cos guess what, you still live there!!!

You have no idea what is happening in Poland and still you have no future there, cos guess what, U will never plan to live there will ya?
OP delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
31 Oct 2010 #173
But, since America is such a melting pot kinda place, we use decent to help identify ourselves.

Why not identify yourself as American? There's a great history there, the language is wonderfully interesting, there's some incredible scenery and such a varied climate. There's a nice anthem and plenty of things to rally around.

I wonder how many of these Plastic Poles would choose Poland over America if they had to? None of them would, I bet.
Pinching Pete - | 558
31 Oct 2010 #174
He has admitted before he hasnt been.

Surprising.. but he probably can speak the lingo..

The Polish people?

Sorry.. Do you have Polish blood in you? If you did.. would you not feel some affinity towards the country? It's really not so deep, you know..
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
31 Oct 2010 #175
I wonder how many of these Plastic Poles would choose Poland over America if they had to? None of them would, I bet.

Of course not, they love to say they are Polish....but they are no more Polish than any Russian, actually, being in America probably means they have more in common with Russia than Poland!

Surprising.. but he probably can speak the lingo..

I bet you good money he cant ;)

Sorry.. Do you have Polish blood in you? If you did.. would you not feel some affinity towards the country? It's really not so deep, you know..

I lived there for long enough to know how much the Polish hate the so called Polish in America who have the vote but refuse to live in Poland.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
31 Oct 2010 #176
I wonder how many of these Plastic Poles would choose Poland over America if they had to? None of them would, I bet.

And what about yourself?
Why did you choose Poland 'over' Scotland?

I lived there

Are you not here?
1jola 14 | 1,879
31 Oct 2010 #177
Now - did these events actually happen,

Yes, these things happened. Independent Poland was emerging again after years of occupation and a war. Jews were dictating special conditions favoring Jews but not other minorities as prerequisite to Poland becoming an independent state, such as state funded, religious Jewish schools, although they were willing that the students also learn Polish. This was accompanied by a smear campaign in the American press about...what else - pogroms. Hugh Gibson, an appointee for the American ambassador to Poland was 'lynched' in the press for writting a report refuting the exegerated Jewish hysteria and falsehoods. It turns out the "pogroms" were the work of bolsheviks, but the aim of smears was political and anti-Polish state, the Polish-Americans united and othe Slavs joined in an economic protest.

You should read more and talk less.
dtaylor5632 18 | 2,007
31 Oct 2010 #178
Why did you choose Poland 'over' Scotland?

Why be Irish and expect to have a vote in that country which you dont live in?
OP delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
31 Oct 2010 #179
Of course not, they love to say they are Polish....but they are no more Polish than any Russian, actually, being in America probably means they have more in common with Russia than Poland!

The thing that many of them don't understand is that there's a bloody good chance that they aren't 100% Polish - looking at history, there was so much interbreeding with Germans, Czechs, Ruthenians, Lithuanians, Ukrainians, etc. Look at their language - the use of "Busha" for grandmother comes directly from Ukrainian.

Actually, what annoys me most is the way that they have such a poor grasp of history - they seem to believe that Poland always existed and that there's no way that Busha and Jaja could be from Russia - even when they were born in Russia.
Pinching Pete - | 558
31 Oct 2010 #180
I lived there for long enough to know how much the Polish hate the so called Polish in America who have the vote but refuse to live in Poland.

They shouldn't be allowed to vote but hey it's not my call. Do you have any idea the amount of money is funneled into that country via Pol Ams?? There is a reason they're allowed to vote.


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