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Jan R. "John" Perucki (from) Turka, nad, Stryjem (now Ukrainets, Mykolaiv, Ukraine)


bgeres 1 | 1
17 Oct 2016 #1
According to his USA entry papers, Jan R. Perucki was born 24 October 1886 in Turka nad Stryjem which I believe to now be the area known as Ukrainets, Mykolaiv, Ukraine (this is not certain).

Jan Perucki listed his country of origin as "Ruthenia". We believe his father to have been Józef Perucki. We are told Jan's brothers were named Leopold and Victor. We are told that his sisters were Adele, Wiska and Wladyslawa Peruka.

When I was young, we were told that Leopold, Victor, Wiska and Victor remained in Turka nad Stryjem. Jan immigrated to the States in the 1890's where he and his sons became coal miners and helped found the Polish National Catholic Church in Peckville, PA and the Spojnia Farm in Waymart, PA.

Jan corresponded with his siblings until his death in 1941. My understanding is that at the beginning of WW2, his uncles Victor and Leopold were killed. The three sisters left their homes and resided in Iran during the remainder of the conflict.

When the (Polish speaking) sisters left Iran, it is said they moved to Warsaw (this is not certain). Following the war, the American family provided some financial assistance to the surviving family in Poland. In the mid 1970's my grandfather (Jan's son, Leopold Perucki) visited Poland with his wife, Mary Wilk Perucki accompanied by the Priest of their church in Peckville.

No records of that visit survive and the US family has lost contact with their relations in Poland. Part of the problem was that in lieu of proper names, the Perucki family in the US referred to each other (and to family in Poland) by nicknames. This is further complicated by the fact that our elders in the States continued to speak Polish among themselves, especially when discussing old family issues. So those of us who never learned the language were left out.

Any constructive commentary or assistance fleshing out the Perucki family or the places and time is welcome.

Thank you all in advance for your time.
Ziemowit 13 | 4,269
18 Oct 2016 #2
an R. Perucki was born 24 October 1886 in Turka nad Stryjem

"Turka nad Stryjem" translates into English as Turka on (river) Stryj.

My understanding is that at the beginning of WW2, his uncles Victor and Leopold were killed. The three sisters left their homes and resided in Iran during the remainder of the conflict.

This means the three sisters were deported by the invading Soviet army from Poland to Siberia (or somewhere closer, but still east of Moscow) and managed to get out of Russia to Iran thanks to the Sikorski-Majski pact signed on the 31 of July 1941.

When the (Polish speaking) sisters left Iran, it is said they moved to Warsaw (this is not certain).

They probably left Iran with the Polish army of general Władysław Anders and landed somewhere in Western Europe from where they moved to Warsaw after the war. Either that or they remained in Iran and came back to Poland (Warsaw) after the war.
OP bgeres 1 | 1
18 Oct 2016 #3
Thank you, "Ziemowit" for your enlightening comments! I've googled Władysław Anders and what you say makes sense. It reminded me that my grandparents were not terribly fond of the Soviets - and maybe knowing what his aunts went through is why.

My grandfather was first a Subway motorman, then a "street-level" Organizer and later a Financial Administrator of the New York Transit Workers Union. When he and his wife made their visit to Poland aboard the TS/S Stefan Batory in the summer and fall of 1976, they took with them sacks of commemorative bicentennial US dollar coins and passed them out freely as gifts. I believe they also brought monetary donations collected by the Union and the Masonic organization, that I gather was distributed to families affected by the food shortages and riots that were occurring in Poland around that time. There were many people with Polish heritage who worked for the NYC Subway system, the Union, the Masons and the Eastern Star who were sensitive to what was going on in Poland at the time. I remember my mother being quite worried that her father (who was a vocal critic of the Soviets) would stir up trouble and end up in Siberia or something (lol?).

But after a couple months there, traveling and meeting people, they came home unscathed. My grandparents loved their brief visit. I remember it particularly amused my grandparents to stand quietly on a train or bus and listen to locals mutter about the "English" couple in their foreign clothes... then my grandfather would introduce himself in perfect (but slightly archaic) Polish and everyone would laugh together for a while.

He was very proud of Poland emerging once again as an independent nation in the years that followed, and in his home added the many bright red Solidarność banners and posters sent to him on the wall next to the framed portrait of Tadeusz Kościuszko and his Poland trip souvenirs.

Again, thank you for your time and information.
Mazowszanka - | 1
13 Feb 2017 #4
Dear Sir,
I have some news for you: Leopold Perucki was killed by Soviets in 1940 . His family were transported like an animals to Siberia. Only his daughter Alfreda was absent at home when Russian arrested his wife , sons and another daughter -Helena. In Siberia Rozalia Perucka sent boys to Polish army - they were pilots. Helena studying pharmacy in Syria and living now in London with her daughter. Alfreda stayed in Poland in Przeworsk with his husband and 3 children until late 70. She removed to Warsaw close to her children and died in 2001. Alfreda Perucka's daughter has one son and Alfeda's son has 2 children. Both they are living in Warsaw but son of Alfreda has bussines in USA. I think they will be happy having any contact with you.

Kind regards


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