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Polish and Irish people are related?


delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
16 Jan 2011 #31
Can you elaborate maybe?

Interestingly, if you look at the previous years - Poland was hovering about 30th place in the world, except during the PiS years when it went down to around 60th. You can clearly see that during SLD and PO years, the press has been much more "free" to report on things.
Krynski - | 82
16 Jan 2011 #32
Interestingly, if you look at the

The hyperactive, hate-spewing, Polonophobic troll going ape again?

What valuable can YOU say about good Europeans, such as Poles and Irish, stupid alien?

... How's the swine-worship going?
:)
delphiandomine 88 | 18,475
16 Jan 2011 #33
... How's the swine-worship going?

I don't know - you're the one that seems to link "swine" with "mother" on a constant basis.

Perhaps you might need therapy for this? I mean, I know it's tough when you spend your days fighting imaginary enemies of Poland on the internet...
Teffle 22 | 1,321
16 Jan 2011 #34
I think it's more about state/press.

Exactly. You misunderstand me. I'm just saying that if there are negatives things to say about the church (or indeed anything - the church is just the example for now) in Poland they may not necessarily always be published.

But yes, there is an upward trend in press freedom in Poland.
Paulina 10 | 1,774
16 Jan 2011 #35
Negative things to say about anything? Are you sure? On what do you base your opinion? Do you read Polish press or watch Polish TV?

But yes, there is an upward trend in press freedom in Poland.

LOL

Sorry, I couldn't help it for some reason ;)
Trevek 26 | 1,702
16 Jan 2011 #36
i think both are slavic, and my last argument for this is the way the english treat both.

What, you mean allow them to come into England and work on building sites for a minimum wage?

there is as much Saxon DNA in modern Irish as Celt.

and probably more than a little Norman, too.

Being underdogs and having had a rough history,

I know what you mean, but it's worth considering that the Poles were pretty much top dogs in their area for a loooong time before 18th C. Granted, history made up for a lot of that in the next 2 centuries.

The Polish also over-identified with the church, due to Godless communism.

Not sure about that. I think it's even earlier than that. Prior to the carve-up of Poland in laate 18th C it was a very multi-ethnic/ multi-religious state. Arguably following the carve-up two of the main powers were Protestant and Orthodox Christians, and, certainly on the Russian side, there is supposed to have been a lot of anti-catholic activity. The ex-pat writers, such as Mickiewicz, who created a "lost Polishness" (in a similar way that Sir Walter Scott created a "lost Highland" culture in Scotland) tended to portray "Polishness" as catholic (something Sienkiewicz continued with some of his works).

Is any catholic country really much different?

Well, Poland tried with uniforms and messed it up totally. It was such a fiasco there should have been a national enquiry into it.
milky 13 | 1,657
16 Jan 2011 #37
Not sure about that.

My point was, that the 'modern day' church was strengthened by the commies,and that the church did not have a quickly eroding influence, as it did,in other european countries.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
16 Jan 2011 #38
Ah, I see. Indeed! I'd still suggest that the reason it was so strong in the first place (strong enough to withstand the communism) was because of the strengthening and connection with "Polish" identity.

From an Irish point of view, much of the strength and identity, as has been mentioned, comes from the anti-Irish/catholic laws of 18th/19th C. Prior to that, many of the Irish freedom fighters, Wolfetone, McCracken etc were protestant.
milky 13 | 1,657
16 Jan 2011 #39
was because of the strengthening and connection with "Polish" identity.

True!and it survived modernity undamaged because of the commies.

From an Irish point of view, much of the strength and identity, as has been mentioned, comes from the anti-Irish/catholic laws of 18th/19th C. Prior to that, many of the Irish freedom fighters, Wolfetone, McCracken etc were protestant.

True.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
16 Jan 2011 #40
Milky, did you know a lot of catholic Scots moved to (Polish) Prussia during 17th/18th C?

And the OP mentions Lublin... one of the main centres of Scottish (protestant) Brotherhood.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
16 Jan 2011 #41
Negative things to say about anything? Are you sure? On what do you base your opinion?

I don't think you understand what I'm saying Paulina.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
16 Jan 2011 #42
it's worth considering that the Poles were pretty much top dogs in their area for a loooong time before 18th C. Granted, history made up for a lot of that in the next 2 centuries.

That is the great historical difference between Poland and Ireland. Not only is Poland "younger" than Ireland, having been formed politically and baptized centuries after Ireland, but Poland's continental situation allowed it to expand, as did Poland's rather interesting "marriage" with Lithuania which was a quite huge place at the time. This situation led to a certain amount of Oriental splendor in Polish history of which Ireland cannot boast. It is said that Jan Sobieski at the battle of Vienna had to order his polish infantry to wear straw catafalques on their heads so that their German allies could tell them apart from the Turks. In other words Turkish haircuts, winged hussaria atop of horses dyed blue and red, and "Sarmats" in turbans and fur are totally alien to Ireland which is after all Europe's most Occidental island.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
16 Jan 2011 #43
Any idea who introduced Christianity to Poland? I know Mieszko I was the first ruler to adopt it but where were the missionaries from, Germany?

I know there are many Schottenkloster (Gaelic monasteries) in Europe which were actually Irish/Scottish missionaries.
Paulina 10 | 1,774
16 Jan 2011 #44
I don't think you understand what I'm saying Paulina.

Well... Then explain (if you want to)?
purplelady 1 | 32
16 Jan 2011 #45
My father's family immigrated to the US from Ireland and my mother's family from Poland. Both families came from poor peasant stock, very simple folks with similar philosophies--God first, family second, work hard and (maybe) you'll get ahead. I miss them all so much.

I feel fortunate to possess the best of both cultures, regardless of whether there is a proven geographic or historical connection.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
16 Jan 2011 #46
My father's family immigrated to the US from Ireland and my mother's family from Poland.

When I first came to Poland, I worked with a lady who was studying American Culture, she told me that Poles married more Irish in America than any other nationality (except Poles of course).

I find that easy to believe.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
16 Jan 2011 #47
I find that easy to believe.

Joined by a love of potatoes and porter, no doubt.
Teffle 22 | 1,321
16 Jan 2011 #48
Well... Then explain (if you want to)?

I thought I had - but, put it this way then:

If a paper in e.g. Finland or The Netherlands wants to print controversial opinions W,X,Y & Z about e.g. the government, then usually it can with very little repurcussions or censorship.

In Ireland, maybe they can say X, Y & Z, in Poland maybe just Y & Z.

The church and governement are just examples - it could be any number of subjects.

I'm not saying the Polish press cannot criticize at all and that their lips are sealed or something but there are obviously things that they cannot say - hence the ranking.

You may read critical pieces - but there is more that should be said, but cannot be.

Maybe this is why you said:

LOL

Sorry, I couldn't help it for some reason ;)

SeanBM 35 | 5,808
16 Jan 2011 #49
In Ireland, maybe they can say X, Y & Z, in Poland maybe just Y & Z.

Perhaps you could give us an example?

I am not entirely sure where you got that idea from.

You could be right, I really don't know, I have a feeling you might not be, purely becuase of Poland throwing off the shackles of communism i.e. censorship but I don't know.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
16 Jan 2011 #50
Perhaps you could give us an example?

I wonder if a Polish comedian could do a programme like Father Ted, and whether a priest would condemn another priest for doing his funeral service (I bet he would, too).
Teffle 22 | 1,321
16 Jan 2011 #51
I am not entirely sure where you got that idea from.

Press freedom rankings - as the above link.

Obviously I don't know the processes at work or how they work but the rankings exist for a reason. The press is more restricted in some shape or form in Poland than it is in Ireland - unless you have reason not to believe the ranking that is.
Paulina 10 | 1,774
16 Jan 2011 #52
I'm not saying the Polish press cannot criticize at all and that their lips are sealed or something but there are obviously things that they cannot say - hence the ranking.

Well, I don't know what are the reasons for such a place and no other of Poland in this ranking because they are not given. There are reasons given for France and Italy:

There has been no progress in several countries where Reporters Without Borders pointed out problems.

... but not for Poland.

Maybe this is why you said:

No, I wrote this because your "expert tone" seemed to me a bit arrogant and funny, because I was pretty sure you have no idea how Polish press and TV looks like :)

I am not entirely sure where you got that idea from.

He's mainly guessing based on the ranking.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
16 Jan 2011 #53
I wonder if a Polish comedian could do a programme like Father Ted

Hmmmm..... That's an interesting thought.
I have shown Polish people Father ted and they love it, I mean really fell in love with it :)

Obviously I don't know the processes at work or how they work but the rankings exist for a reason. The press is more restricted in some shape or form in Poland than it is in Ireland - unless you have reason not to believe the ranking that is.

Fair enough, I don't know, I tend to trust statistics less and less, numbers are just too easily manipulated to suit the person putting them together ir more times than that simply misinterpreted.
isthatu2 4 | 2,703
16 Jan 2011 #54
Father Ted,The war years;
Harry
16 Jan 2011 #55
I wonder if a Polish comedian could do a programme like Father Ted

No chance: anybody who even tried would either wake up to find a mob of pitch-fork waving mohair beret wearing twats outside his door or get hauled before the court for mocking religion like Doda did.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
16 Jan 2011 #56
mocking religion like Doda did.

Holy moly!

In May 2010, the Warsaw prosecutor's office charged Doda with the crime of "offending religious sensibilities" for remarking in a year-ago television interview that she believed more in dinosaurs than she did in the Bible because "it is hard to believe in something written by people who drank too much wine and smoked herbal cigarettes."[5] If convicted, she faces up to two years in prison under Poland's blasphemy laws.

Wiki
Teffle 22 | 1,321
16 Jan 2011 #57
... but not for Poland.

And? So what?

No, I wrote this because your "expert tone" seemed to me a bit arrogant and funny, because I was pretty sure you have no idea how Polish press and TV looks like :)

It's not even relevant.

He's mainly guessing based on the ranking.

Of course - so what's your guess as to why Poland has less press freedom than the countries that are ranked higher? How can it possibly be anything other than they are less free to print what they want?

You have a strange attitude.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
16 Jan 2011 #58
I have shown Polish people Father ted and they love it, I mean really fell in love with it :)

I showed it to my Liceum studes when I taught in a catholic liceum. They adored it. I was all set to show them the "Speed" episode but a friend commented it had some rather sexual language in it, so I backed off.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
16 Jan 2011 #59
And I see pûrn in every petrol station, little shop and on TV here in Poland.
I have never seen that in Ireland, certainly not when I was a kid, maybe the very odd pair of boobs on some boring French film that the censors had fallen asleep to, and they are worried about the sexual language of father Ted?

*note
I mean ''odd'' as in ''rare pair of boobs'' not that the boobs themselves were odd :)
Paulina 10 | 1,774
16 Jan 2011 #60
And? So what?

So... we don't know the reasons exactly, do we?

It's not even relevant.

What is not relevant? That I found what you wrote funny? xD

Of course - so what's your guess as to why Poland has less press freedom than the countries that are ranked higher? How can it possibly be anything other than they are less free to print what they want?

They could, for example, publish whatever they want, but some politicians could sue the newspaper for that, or something. Or it could be only about TVP1. I have no idea...

I remember that in some ranking about women equality Poland dropped a few places or more because in some country in Africa or somewhere else a woman was chosen for a president in that particular year.

So, Teffle, why do you think there is less freedom of press/speech in Ireland than in Finland, Iceland, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Austria and New Zealand? Have you noticed any restrictions of the freedom of press/speech in your country?

You have a strange attitude.

What do you mean?


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