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Agnieszka Pomaska, beautiful Polish politician


Paulina 9 | 1,448
19 Jan 2014 #31
Ones that don't get attacked in the media.

Um... What?
You'd have to elaborate, jon357, this one sentence is way to cryptic for me... lol

Of course you do. Women doll up whether they are in politics or in any other work venue. It's (almost) natural judging by how automatically they seem to do it.

What does "doll up" mean?

Zimmy, looks are important to some extent at any workplace and everybody is trying to look good, both men and women. Probably for most women that means also wearing make-up, for others - it doesn't. Or they just prefer to sleep longer before work instead of getting up early to look "perfect" (that would be me lol).

And yes, it's natural for many women, it's like putting on your blouse or sweater - it's like an element of everyday attire, a second skin. Some women (like my friend) don't like to get out of their house without make-up on, no matter where they go, because they feel "ugly" then (and my friend is pretty, but you won't convince her otherwise...).

I'm not sure what "knocking it" means, but if it means "criticizing" then probably you're doing it, as always when women are concerned.

As to politicians, in the U.S. it is often said that Hollywood is for beautiful people and politics is for ugly people.

Well, it doesn't look like that. Your politicians seem to care a lot about how they look, how they dress, about their image, etc.
jon357 63 | 15,194
19 Jan 2014 #32
this one sentence is way to cryptic for me

Looks straightforward to me, but since you have to ask...

Several very high profile women politicians round have been attacked in the press over the past few years because of perceived shortcomings in their personal grooming.

Do keep up with current affairs.
Paulina 9 | 1,448
19 Jan 2014 #33
Looks straightforward to me, but since you have to ask...

Yes, I had to, since I wasn't sure what you're talking about - your comment was rather minimalistic... Sorry if explaining it to me was such a great trouble...

Do keep up with current affairs.

Jawohl, Herr jon357!
Ironside 49 | 10,474
19 Jan 2014 #34
The woman is doing nothing to help Poles in either Britain or Poland by making ignorant statements that fail to address the real issues.

She is a politician after all in this age and place you don't expect politicians to address the real issues. After all they are just clowns and puppets unable to chnage the system.

This kind of talk will encourage not discourage scapegoating.

In my opinion that kind of talk discourage worse cases of scapegoating by politicians, they are a queer breed those politicians.

Either way - she isn't stunning at all.

Well, she is not even pretty.

I'm not sure what "knocking it" means, but if it means "criticizing" then probably you're doing it, as always when women are concerned.

OH? Come on he is only saying that men and women differ unlike "modern" morons who claims otherwise.
Szczerbaty 4 | 49
19 Jan 2014 #35
Not surprised at all that Brits can't compete with Poles. Poles are hungry.

Working with Brits for 13 years, I found it disturbing how often I heard them wanting to go home to live on the dole. I find this practice of sucking the government's tit a bit lame.

I taught at a Polish university for eight years and Polish students are smart. Go get those good jobs Poles!
jon357 63 | 15,194
19 Jan 2014 #36
Easy to generalise. There are plenty of Poles happy to sit at home and live on the minimum, even without much dole. And plenty of Brits who work very, very hard.
kaz200972 2 | 229
19 Jan 2014 #37
She is a politician after all in this age and place you don't expect politicians to address the real issues.

I expect them to at least try! I would also expect some insight into important issues.

In my opinion that kind of talk discourage worse cases of scapegoating by politicians, they are a queer breed those politicians.

I agree politicians can be odd at times but her comments will just cause further
rows.
McDouche 6 | 286
20 Jan 2014 #38
That said my main issue with the OP's thread is that looks should not be a voting issue, whatever the gender of the candidates.

Yeah, it's kind of sad that the looks of women are being discussed in a topic about politics. That really is kind of sexist to say that a woman should be good-looking in order to be in politics. I mean, let's face it. There are so many bad-looking men in politics.

This kind of talk will encourage not discourage scapegoating.

I don't think most Brits will care too much about this. Her comments will **** off young chavs probably but not the rest of the British population. Like I said before, Poles in Britain are not taking jobs that require much of an education. Poles are really just competing with young Brits and other immigrants.

As for polish politician beauties please check Elzbieta Bienkowska (famous for her tattoos) and Joanna Mucha - both Civic Platform

The woman with dark hair doesn't look bad for her age. I'm not sure what you see in the blonde though.

So you're saying that Western people look terrible both in photos and in the flesh? lol

I'm not sure how you got that. Perhaps try reading what I said again? I don't think Poland has ever had a politician as good-looking as JFK.
Paulina 9 | 1,448
20 Jan 2014 #39
OH? Come on he is only saying that men and women differ unlike "modern" morons who claims otherwise.

I'm not sure about that.

And what differences do you have in mind?

I'm not sure how you got that.

I was just making fun of your chauvinism :)

Perhaps try reading what I said again? I don't think Poland has ever had a politician as good-looking as JFK.

JFK?

Really?
He had a nice smile and that's pretty much all...
We had better looking politicians. For example, "Piękny Marian" lol - Marian Krzaklewski:

Now the platform has the last moments primarily on self-reflection and change even in the treatment of social issues - said in an interview with the former head of RMF FM AWS Krzaklewski .

Krzaklewski added that when he meets representatives of the PO , asks that passed the leadership of the party that did return when it comes to the treatment of social issues.

- I'm not going to go back to politics now . As for today , or tomorrow I will not. And tomorrow I'll be rested , because it 's Sunday. Today I will be together with your organization Works to march in Warsaw - said the former President of the "Solidarity" .

And when he was older:
OP Englishman 2 | 278
20 Jan 2014 #40
Englishman:First time I've ever wanted to go down on a member of parliament...
I think you could save such comments for your male friends when at the pub.

I'm sorry if I caused offence. I was feeling rather lonely and starved of female company when I wrote that comment. It's not a good excuse, I know.

The bravest woman will be the one who doesn't apply make-up, hair color and consistently wears pants suits. :)

I agree, though I think pressure to wear make-up and hair colour should be treated differently than any stigma attached to pants/trouser suits. The first two entail putting chemicals on the body to make a person look different to how they are naturally. IMO it's wrong that there should be pressure on women to do this.

The last, clothing, is on some level a signifier of social values. I think it's one of the few negative aspects of feminism that some parts of the movement have denigrated traditionally female clothing, and as a result some women in politics or business feel under pressure to wear trousers/pants, as if wearing skirts or dresses would present them as somehow 'not serious enough'. In fact there have been surveys in the UK and US where it has been shown that both women and men take women more seriously when they wear skirts/dresses. So if you're right and there's pressure on female politicans to dress that way, I think that's not necessarily a bad thing. Much better that than the other way round (pressure to wear pants).
Ironside 49 | 10,474
20 Jan 2014 #41
I'm sorry if I caused offence.

Don't worry about that I doubt you caused offense, you are on PF people argue here for real :)
szczecinianin 4 | 345
20 Jan 2014 #42
I taught at a Polish university for eight years and Polish students are smart. Go get those good jobs Poles!

I agree with your first sentence that 'Poles are hungry'.

But fairly obviously, after a generation or so living in the UK, they will cease to be so.

It should also be pointed out that there are many in the world 'hungrier' than Poles. Ukrainians, for example.

Personally, what I find really 'lame' are over-qualified Poles doing crap jobs in the UK going on about how 'superior' they are to natives. No doubt some Brit with a Phd would be cleverer than the average Polish manual worker, but somehow I couldn't imagine many British intellectuals doing physical work in Poland and complaining they couldn't discuss the finer points of Wittgenstein with their work colleagues.


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