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Greatest Old Towns in Poland


Satchkat - | 20
14 Jan 2013  #31
Isn't there also a bit that is actually called Stare Miasto? A bit north of the Main Town.

Yes, there is - however it's not what pawian was showing. In this case, "old town" refers to the eldest part, but not the representative one. Old town and main town are quite commonly mixed up. Does that make sense?
Kasmiski 1 | 6
17 Jan 2013  #32
I'm curious.. call this a dumb question if you will, but is there reasoning for the color choice on the majority (well what I've noticed) of Poland buildings. They're very bright colored, from what I can tell, beautiful if you ask me. Just wasn't sure what, if any, reasoning was behind it.

Thank you :)
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
17 Jan 2013  #33
but is there reasoning for the color choice on the majority

happy colours equals happy people

or did you want grey and miserable
Kasmiski 1 | 6
18 Jan 2013  #34
Nope. Just was curious. Being from the US, I don't see much of that. Like I referred to the colors, "beautiful ". I was intrigued, actually.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
18 Jan 2013  #35
Nope. Just was curious

If there is a national colour it seems to be a sort of mustard/yellow, which can be seen in villages as well as cities throughout Poland.

The colours do seem lmited to a small number of colours, but are used well. Shades of red, blue, yellow, green and brown.

Wroclaw's Rynek shows half a dozen colours that the city gave approval to
OP pawian 159 | 9,497
18 Jan 2013  #36
Nope. Just was curious. Being from the US, I don't see much of that. Like I referred to the colors, "beautiful ". I was intrigued, actually.

Hmm, yes, I also thought about it. I sometimes wonder if those Polish Old Towns aren`t too colourful. After all, bright flashy colours are popularly associated with tasteless gaudiness.

Wroclaw's Rynek shows half a dozen colours that the city gave approval to

Let`s compare.

Wrocław is very flashy

Warsaw

and Krakow a bit less

s
johnb121 4 | 184
18 Jan 2013  #37
Think, too, of the palette of Norwegian house colours.

Wasn't the original selection restricted to colours whose chemicals in the paint would resist weather and fading? So composition of the paint governs durability governs choices available?
Wroclaw 44 | 5,388
18 Jan 2013  #38
I only know that in wroclaw the colours come from a list and that the paint must be a particular type.
OP pawian 159 | 9,497
18 Jan 2013  #39
Think, too, of the palette of Norwegian house colours.

Cannot find Norwegian Old Town (???) so I am presenting Danish one from Copenhagen. Flashy!!!
johnb121 4 | 184
18 Jan 2013  #40
You don't need to search for an old town in Norway - but here are a couple of shots







Lyzko
19 Jan 2013  #41
Would one of those shots be of Stavanger, perchance? Just wondering:-)

My vote's still be Kraków with it's Sukiennica, Wawel..... Never been as yet, unfortunately, but that's only what I've heard (.. and seen in umpteen photo albums)LOL
johnb121 4 | 184
19 Jan 2013  #42
Actually, I think they're Longyearbyen, Bergen and Honningsvag
Lyzko
20 Jan 2013  #43
At the very least, I guessed they were in Norway! Only know Oslo Airport from the trip en route NY to Copenhagen...never even left the hangar:-)

lol
OP pawian 159 | 9,497
20 Jan 2013  #44
You don't need to search for an old town in Norway - but here are a couple of shots

What is wrong with Norway and their Old Towns? Vikings didn`t build ones???

Lublin, capital of Eastern Poland:

s

podroze.gazeta.pl/podroze/51,114158,13214810.html?i=12
johnb121 4 | 184
20 Jan 2013  #45
What is wrong with Norway and their Old Towns? Vikings didn`t build ones???

What I meant was there's no need to specifically look for an OLD town - modern homes in Norway are every bit as colourful
OP pawian 159 | 9,497
21 Jan 2013  #46
Oh, I see.

Biecz - according to a legend, a school of hangmen was located in Biecz.

Grybów, a tiny town in southern Poland, we always pass through it going on holidays:

Grybow, Poland

Unfortunately, Old Towns make only a small part of the settlements they are located in. E.g., Krakow`s Old town is less than 10% of the city`s area:

s

Can you see that iregular oval in the middle? So small....

Krakow

The reason?
Comparing to European standards, Polish towns had rather low population when they originated and developed a few centuries ago.
Niko
27 Sep 2015  #47
That depends on what you call 'old town' exactly.
Actually, Kazimierz and Podgorze lie south from that shape you're pointing at.
West, there's Krowodrza, and East Grzegorzki, both districts with their shares of nice buildings renovated (or in need for renovation).
As time is passing by, the heart of Old Town is getting cramped and more people are looking more carefully at those other districts that extend beyond Stare Miasto.
OP pawian 159 | 9,497
27 Sep 2015  #48
That depends on what you call 'old town' exactly.
Actually, Kazimierz and Podgorze lie south from that shape you're pointing at.

By Old Town I mean exactly the area which originated in the Middle Ages (during the main settlement era, mostly in result of implementation of Magdeburg Rights)

https://polishforums.com/history/poles-owe-germans-53954/#msg1174498

Kazimierz is OK, yes, came into being in 14 century, has its own market square etc.

But other districts you mention aren`t old enough to me.

Some places are only Old Towns with marginal development beyond the defensive walls area:

Szydłów - once thriving, then declined and remained so till today.

s

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Not far from Szydłów there is Staszów. I used to teach there nearly two decades ago. Great times. :)

Kalisz again. I can`t resist, it is so beautiful from the air.....

s

Though a closer look shows standard stuff on the ground level

s


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