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I hate Warsaw. The worst part about living here is the people who move here from small towns, villages..


Dominika99 1 | 93
31 Oct 2012 #1
I've lived in this city for nearly six years... I had enough money to go out and enjoy nice places, and friends to have fun with. I've made an honest effort to get to know the different neighborhoods of the city. I took walks in elegant parks, went to the ballet, saw amazing concerts, dined at great restaurants.

I can't say I didn't enjoy myself. But I never really got to love this city, and it's not because I didn't try.

It's grey, ugly and cold most of the year. It calls itself "Europe," but everyday on my street I have to dodge drunks in gateways and dog **** on the sidewalk because people don't clean up after their pets.

The worst part about living here is the people. I can't say anything about native Varsovians, because they are a rare breed and I liked most of the natives I've met.

What I can't stand are the people who move here from small towns, villages and cities, and they start making 3,000 zloty a month and think they're the kings of the universe. The arrogance is sickening, and no it's not like other big cities in the world. I've been to New York and London, and nowhere did I see the sickening stuck-up attitude that I do around here. What exactly is there to be so proud of?

I also don't understand why people stare and size each other up so much. In most cities I've been to, it's considered rude to stare at someone on the street, but people in Warsaw stare at each other and make no efforts to hide it. And if you look even slightly different than the norm, then people turn their heads and make wide eyes. I once walked behind a group of foreigners who were not dressed like Europeans, and people's reactions were either sad or hilarious to watch. I guess they don't have foreign people in the small towns where these people in Warsaw come from, but isn't it a bit rude to stare?

Whenever I travel to other cities like Poznan or Wroclaw, the atmosphere is so different and relaxed that it's a relief to be there. And I don't mean Warsaw is fast-paced, because it's a ghost town compared to Cairo or Los Angeles. Maybe i don't know quite how to phrase it, but there's something so awkward about Warsaw. Like it's trying to be something big, and failing miserably.

It's such a good feeling to know that I'm finally leaving this place.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
31 Oct 2012 #2
I am almost totally sure you are Polish, and you came to Warsaw from a smaller town.
OP Dominika99 1 | 93
31 Oct 2012 #3
I'm Polish, but I came to Warsaw from a bigger city that's outside of Poland.
poland_
31 Oct 2012 #4
I am quite the opposite I really do like Warsaw. Although I do get the ' staring' bit its quite a strange trait. I also get the dog **** bit as well,especially as the law states you must clean after your dog or be fined. Here is my spin about Warsaw there are three types of Polish people in Warsaw, those who are sophisticated and are impeccably mannered, those who wish to be seen as being sophisticated and finally those that just don't have a clue.

In the foreign department it is just plain and simple, those who have money living in Warsaw and those wish everyone to believe they have money and are successful in business.
Varsovian 92 | 634
31 Oct 2012 #5
Magdalena with her blistering personal attack must come from Warsaw (with parents from a little town). They're like that ...
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
31 Oct 2012 #6
My point was that surprisingly, it is mostly second-generation Varsovians who are so critical of new arrivals. I have lived in Warsaw for almost 20 years and somehow managed to avoid segregating people into desirable ("natives") and undesirable (people from anywhere else). Yes, I was being sarcastic. Peace.
OP Dominika99 1 | 93
31 Oct 2012 #7
I am quite the opposite I really do like Warsaw.

You're really lucky, then. I guess there are some places we just click with, and others that we'll never love. I tried to ignore the little annoyances of living in Warsaw, but ultimately I found that I could never feel comfortable here. People are just too uptight...
palanzo2000 - | 2
31 Oct 2012 #8
Dominika99 I have to agree with you.

I lived in Warsaw for 6 months and couldn't wait to leave.

I found the people to be rude and completely ignorant to the fact that I was trying my best to speak Polish whenever I could, not to mention the staring I encountered on a daily basis. I also got the impression that many people thought that they were something special and better than me (they probably were to be honest!).

My lasting impression of the city was the lady who worked at my local connivence store, I'm sure it was the highlight of her day when I nervously approached the counter and asked for groceries in my best Polish to which she would inevitably reply with some comment under her breath with rolling eyes.

I will never go back!!!

I would however, like to point out that I have also visited Krackov, Lodz, Zakapana & Wroclaw where I felt most welcome and found Warsaw to be the exception.

Lastly I would have to say that my favourite place to visit in Poland is a small town called Dobdrozien in Oploskie where my wife is from. The people there are fantastic! they are welcoming, friendly and I am very happy to call many of them friends.

In my opinion the "villagers" or locals are what makes your county great and different.

Warsaw is a big city wannabe...but its not.

Never forget where your from!

I am from London where you are all welcome:)
poland_
31 Oct 2012 #9
People are just too uptight...

Maybe one thing you missed out on is that the majority of Poles are very nervous about speaking English to a native, its the fear of not being in control.

You may have also witnessed the period of the yuppies in Poland especially Warsaw, all the gear - no idea types.

My funniest moments are when the bill turns up in a restaurant or coffee-shop and everyone wants to pay their own down to the 'grosz.' bizarre at best, they are certainly money obsessed and would almost do anything for a buck. Morals are certainly sliding in Warsaw.
OP Dominika99 1 | 93
31 Oct 2012 #10
Maybe one thing you missed out on is that the majority of Poles are very nervous about speaking English to a native, its the fear of not being in control.

The thing is, I'm Polish... my Polish kind of sucked in the beginning, but it's a little better now. I was nervous about talking to people in Polish at first, though I quickly stopped caring.

Plus I don't only mean they're uptight when they're talking to you. It's just a vibe I get, I guess. I can't really explain it. But it's like people are always working on keeping up appearances, and posing. They don't often lean back, sit on the steps and eat a lunch, or lay around in teh grass at the park. Well the last could be because of the aforementioned dog **** problem, but you get the idea.

I would however, like to point out that I have also visited Krackov, Lodz, Zakapana & Wroclaw where I felt most welcome and found Warsaw to be the exception.

That's great, that's how you should remember Poland :) I'm going to Lodz for a couple days to visit before I leave Poland for good. I've never been there, but I want my last impressions and images of my country to be positive.

I agree that Warsaw seems like it's trying to be a big city, but somehow it doesn't feel like it. The service in shops and restaurants is getting better, but I really wish people would learn how to fake a smile even if they're not in the mood. They get paid to service customers, after all.
rybnik 18 | 1,462
31 Oct 2012 #11
I am almost totally sure you are Polish, and you came to Warsaw from a smaller town.

Impressive.
Magdalena, what tipped you off?
pip 10 | 1,661
31 Oct 2012 #12
I like Warsaw, I have lived here a while. I don't think your post is wrong. Warsaw has its good and bad just like any city. Small town people making money in the big city are awful but so are those that grew up in the blocks and have made it big. My husband works with a few and they are complete a-holes.

my personal favourites are the old hags that work at the post. yes it is an awful job, yes the pay sucks- so instead of searching for a better job, and there are plenty out there, they would rather spend their days in misery. But as for regular businesses- those that offer poor customer service will lose business. Poles are become more selective now that there are more options.
OP Dominika99 1 | 93
31 Oct 2012 #14
my personal favourites are the old hags that work at the post. yes it is an awful job, yes the pay sucks- so instead of searching for a better job, and there are plenty out there, they would rather spend their days in misery.

The people at my post office (Pl Trzech Krzyzy) are so nice that at first I thought they were playing some kind of prank on me :) But I haven't been to many besides that one.
1jola 14 | 1,879
1 Nov 2012 #15
Well, at least you felt safe here, which is a plus for a woman, wouldn't you agree? But good luck in vibrant Cairo and LA.

Maybe I'm mean, but there is a good chance you will have one last bad experience...at the airport or on the way to it.

Also, we do stare at people here when they have that look on their face as if something smelled.
warszawianka - | 31
1 Nov 2012 #16
It's funny how even though someone doesn't say anything, people generally can size them up by their expression or the way they carry themselves. That is, if one would carry themself in a haughty manner at a subway in downtown NY somewhere, they're liable to wind up knocked off the platform right onto the third rail : ) If one is not in their native country, it would probably be best to be benevolent toward certain local customs and conduct oneself as a grateful guest. Not like some of the people who come to my area and act as if everyone owes them. Of course, some of the demeanor thingy is lost in translation among "chołota".
1jola 14 | 1,879
1 Nov 2012 #17
I had two good staring experiences so far. One was when I ran al a Cybulski to catch a bus at night. When I got on, a dozen people were not only staring at me but were also smirking. I selfconsciously wiped my face in case I had a big snot wrapped around my face or something. I didn't. I relaxed and stood there like bikiniarz with my hands in my pockets riding the bus wave. Then it came. On the next bus stop, the driver slammed the brakes so hard that I went flying and nearly broke my ribs. Someone else got on the bus, and I joined the others in staring and smirking while holding on tightly.

Another time I got on the tram and there were few people so we stared at each other out of boredom. Every single person had blue eyes. I was ready for a group hug.

Now I wish women under forty would stare at me.
boletus 30 | 1,366
1 Nov 2012 #18
I had two good staring experiences so far.

I got your point. I call it the old train compartment syndrom (OTCS).
There are four of you in the train compartment: relaxing, swapping stories, sharing hard boiled eggs and home grown tomatoes.

A new face shows up. Everybody stares. With hate.

But soon the man opens a bottle of something delicious.

The hard boiled eggs, tomatoes, and schnapps around. All are friends.

Until another intruder shows up...
Nacjonalista 4 | 96
1 Nov 2012 #19
Can all the people complaining about getting stared at please post their pics and I can try and see why that is.
poland_
1 Nov 2012 #20
Also, we do stare at people here when they have that look on their face as if something smelled.

Beg to differ, you stare at people here, when they smile, cus you automatically think they have just escaped the asylum. The something smelled face is standard facial expression for Warsaw.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,771
1 Nov 2012 #21
There are four of you in the train compartment: relaxing, swapping stories, sharing hard boiled eggs and home grown tomatoes.

Last time I was on the train, there were no eggs, stories and definitely no tomatoes :( can I ride with you next time?
boletus 30 | 1,366
1 Nov 2012 #22
Right. :-)
This is what I remember from my childhood. :-)
And the railway workers playing "Baśka" over the satchel positioned on the knees of the players. This was the fastest ever card game for up to four players, 16 cards, money changing place with the speed of light. Zolo! (solo) Zolo du! Wesele!
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
1 Nov 2012 #23
As for the staring: it's probably just ordinary looking, but for someone who comes from a culture which makes a point of pretending other people on the street or on public transport don't exist, it might seem intimidating. I prefer to be stared at than not acknowledged at all. Funny how it's rude to look ("stare") at other people on the street, but at the same time we're supposed to be all smiles and grin at total strangers like there's no tomorrow ;-)
Lenka 3 | 1,514
1 Nov 2012 #24
Right. :-)
This is what I remember from my childhood. :-)

That's how I remember it to :) New trains (especially Intercity) are not good for that.Although I must say that the last time I traveled from Berlin I met women on the train and there were stories but tomatoes and eggs were exchanged for pear
OP Dominika99 1 | 93
1 Nov 2012 #25
Well, at least you felt safe here, which is a plus for a woman, wouldn't you agree?

I didn't say I feel safe, or that I didn't feel safe.

But good luck in vibrant Cairo and LA.
Maybe I'm mean, but there is a good chance you will have one last bad experience...at the airport or on the way to it.

Doubt it... it's always an easy and quick trip there in a taxi, and the lines aren't very long. Sorry to disappoint you.

Also, we do stare at people here when they have that look on their face as if something smelled.

You stare regardless of facial expressions.
NorthMancPolak 4 | 648
1 Nov 2012 #26
I've been to New York and London, and nowhere did I see the sickening stuck-up attitude that I do around here.

You've only "been" to London, whereas I have lived there for a third of my life. I can guarantee that there are plenty of arrogant, stuck-up, self-obsessed and money-orientated people there. Though I would add that this is the case in every major city I've lived in, these days at least.

Capital cities tend to have this on an even higher level, though. In some ways, it's justified - capitals tend to attract the ambitious (like me :) ), and it's true to say that I've achieved my greatest successes in London and not elsewhere. The downside is that you usually have to live in a totally different way to achieve this within capital cities (higher costs, longer travelling times, less space, more crime, no car, etc), which is partly why some people who live in places like Warsaw or London may think they are "better" - they aren't really, but if you are willing to endure certain discomforts in order to achieve success/money, it's hardly surprising that you may look down on the unambitious people you left behind.

This probably makes me sound a bit stuck-up lol, but I'm not, I'm just trying to explain that places like London are virtually a separate state within a country, and the rules are a little different there ;)

I like Warsaw - it's the only Polish city I really feel at home in, but I think that 12 months there would be more than enough for me.
sobieski 107 | 2,128
1 Nov 2012 #27
There are four of you in the train compartment: relaxing, swapping stories, sharing hard boiled eggs and home grown tomatoes.

Last time I was on the IC between Kraków and Warsaw, everybody got a free cup of coffee and then settled down in their own routine. Laptop, book, newspaper.

Nobody staring at anybody
sa11y 5 | 331
1 Nov 2012 #28
asked for groceries

How long ago??? The only counter where you have to ask for anything is deli counter and kiosk??? Pretty much everything else is on shelves for you to put in your basket and pay?
poland_
1 Nov 2012 #29
sobieski, it is funny how most people do NOT want a tea or coffee, until the trolley man explains it is for free on the IC. It makes me smile very time.
boletus 30 | 1,366
1 Nov 2012 #30
I said: the Old Train Compartment Syndrome. :-)
But hey, some things stay the same as usual. Try to take a train (no buses) from Komańcza to Krynica Zdrój. This is only 133 km by road, probably 180 km by rail.

Here is one example. There are three train rides: Komańcza => Zagórz, Zagórz => Stróże, Stróźe => Krynica. 0:48, 3:38 and 3:11 rides, 2:12, 4:43 waiting times.

Total 14:30 hours : 7:37 ride and 6:53 waiting time.
Plenty of time for food and staring around. :-)




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