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Poles speaking English - examples


Alien 20 | 4,966
16 Jan 2024 #121
, he is an angel

Lyzko doesn't believe in angels.
Ironside 53 | 12,424
17 Jan 2024 #122
hahahaha

here is some cheese for you.
Lyzko 45 | 9,417
17 Jan 2024 #123
@Ironside, you realize you haven't one scintilla of evidence to support your specious claims.
@Alien, I certainly do believe in angels.
Ironside 53 | 12,424
17 Jan 2024 #124
@Ironside,

Do you mean to say that baboons do not eat cheese?
Lyzko 45 | 9,417
17 Jan 2024 #125
?? Another Polish joke which got lost in the translation from stupid into English, I see.
Ironside 53 | 12,424
17 Jan 2024 #126
I see.

# You can see.
That's good, at your age you should count your blessings, hey you can even troll.
Lyzko 45 | 9,417
18 Jan 2024 #127
You know very well what I mean. Furthermore, eighty is not old. It's the new sixty. LOL
Thanks for the compliment. Trolling's your department too.
OP pawian 223 | 24,375
21 Jan 2024 #128
PiS Ex Minister Of Education committed a Twitter post which was ridiculed by readers for mistakes. Fools!!!! Does everybody have to speak and write like Shaykspeer????

Przemysław Czarnek
@CzarnekP
Dear
@elonmusk
,

right after the Auschwitz visit, we invite you to on behalf of Free Poles to Radom and Ostrołęka prisons, where Polish members of parlament are hold in captive. This is the first time since 1989 that we have political prisoners in Poland.

Let the world hear how the new government coalition is breaking the law at every step just in one month after taking the power. There is an ongoing attack on the Polish media, courts and broadly understood freedom.

OP pawian 223 | 24,375
26 Feb 2024 #129
Polish FM Sikorski in his famous anti Russian speech in the UN a few days ago: Not bad but he seems sort of coping, even struggling with his English occassionally. I prefer Rafał Trzaskowski who is more fluent.


Alien 20 | 4,966
28 Feb 2024 #130
famous anti Russian speech in the UN a few days ago

It wasn't an anti-russian speech, he just told the truth.
jon357 74 | 22,054
29 Feb 2024 #131
I prefer Rafał Trzaskowski who is more fluent.

I'd say he's more precise and less fluent as a whole.

Sikorsky certainly has higher fluency and a much greater range.
Atch 22 | 4,124
29 Feb 2024 #132
he seems sort of coping, even struggling with his English occassionally.

No he's very fluent. He sounds natural. Native English speakers punctuate their speech with ums and ahs all the time. It's a feature of our speech. He sounds measured and thoughtful. It's his communication style. I've also seen him being interviewed when he has to answer off the cuff and he's thoroughly proficient in the English language. I prefer his accent to Trzaskowski who is a bit Americanized for my taste.

Trzaskowski who is more fluent.

He's not more fluent. He speaks faster, that's all.

They both have great English.
mafketis 37 | 10,884
29 Feb 2024 #133
struggling with his English occassionally

What I've noticed is that natives and non-natives have different evaluations of second language speakers.... I notice that my evaluation of second Polish language speakers is often different from that of Poles (there's overall agreement but the details differ).

in the particular case of Polish second language english speakers Poles tend to place more value on speed and number of mistakes while natives tend to value intonation and overall naturalness of expression.

I have no intention of making a detailed comparison and I've barely heard Trzaskowski's or Skikorski's English but fleeting first impressions....

Trzaskowski: he is indeed faster and he completely ignores small errors (that is actually a good thing to do). He sounds a bit more like a star student in a language class. But there's something.... unnatural in his use (or non-use) of filler words.

Sikorski is slower but more... thoughtful and he uses filler words (a necessary part of all language communication) in a much more natural way and sounds like someone who's used the language for decades to do things (which require high levels of language proficiency) in the real world but no longer pays attention to certain language class diktats....

Both men represent the country very well in English.
jon357 74 | 22,054
29 Feb 2024 #134
sounds like someone who's used the language for decades to do things (which require high levels of language proficiency

Worth mentioning that he went to Oxford.

a star student in a language class

That's my feeling too. Traszkowski does sound a bit languageschoolish. As if he paid attention in an FCE class and did well in the bit of the exam where they have to describe pictures.
Bobko 25 | 2,047
29 Feb 2024 #135
Not bad but he seems sort of coping, even struggling with his English occassionally

I'm definitely impressed with his English.

To me it comes across as pretty posh, or as posh as Eastern European accents can be - while still being apparent. Very British.
jon357 74 | 22,054
29 Feb 2024 #136
pretty posh

He was in the Bullingdon Club.
mafketis 37 | 10,884
29 Feb 2024 #137
...ooga booga? (I have no idea what that is...)
jon357 74 | 22,054
29 Feb 2024 #138
Upper class young men at Oxford who wear white tie and tails and smash up restaurants shouting "buller buller buller" while they do it. They pay for the damage afterwards. Invitation only, no more than about 20 at a time. Not well thought of.

Boris Johnson and David Cameron were both members, at least one if not both of them at the same time as him.

Can you guess what lie he told in order to be invited?
mafketis 37 | 10,884
29 Feb 2024 #139
ohnson and David Cameron were both members

Sounds a bit like Skull and Bones at Yale...
jon357 74 | 22,054
29 Feb 2024 #140
There are definite parallels. Some differences too since most of them went to the same three or four schools and are probably distantly (or not so distantly) related anyway. Perhaps skull and bones works like that too.

As far as I know it's been going for a long time. Evelyn Waugh mentioned them indirectly in Brideshead Revisited puking up through Charles Ryder's window.
Bobko 25 | 2,047
29 Feb 2024 #141
He was in the Bullingdon Club.

I definitely need to read more about Polish history between 1960-1981.

How was Sikorsky able to leave? I understand that afterwards, he was granted political asylum after the crackdown against Solidarity - but how did he leave in the first place?

Also, I didn't know that he's married to Anne Applebaum - a Russian hater par excellence, on the level of Masha Gessen and Garry Kasparov.
Bobko 25 | 2,047
29 Feb 2024 #142
Honestly, the more I think about it, the more obvious that Sikorsky was cultivated by British intelligence from an early age.

How does a guy from Bydgoszcz, join a club whose members are almost all British aristocracy? How does he pay for that lifestyle?

Then he goes to work in the press, and the detail he chooses is... covering the Soviet war in Afghanistan?

After that, he works for the American Enterprise Institute?

This guy has a strange biography.
mafketis 37 | 10,884
29 Feb 2024 #143
cultivated by British intelligence

Yay British intelligence! Cultivating behind the Iron Curtain! Pretty stupid of the communists to let that happen (and good for Poland).
Bobko 25 | 2,047
29 Feb 2024 #144
Yay British intelligence

How does Poland care nothing about this?

The guy only denounced his citizenship in 2006.

Even banana republics like America, have a native-born requirement for the top jobs.

This guy may be native born, but the rest of his biography makes it clear that he has dual loyalties.
Lyzko 45 | 9,417
29 Feb 2024 #145
In my experience, the majority of youngish and middle-age Poles whom I've
encountered tend to attempt a solid imitation of an educated Britisher.

Those clodhopper, caricatured "Polish accent" heard among uneducated
Polish immigrants has become a thing of the past, I think. For example,
in Greenpoint Bklyn. not far from where we live in Fort Lee, NJ, one typically
hears people who speak English so influenced by their native Polish pronunciation
and sentence structure, idiom etc., it's often difficult for me to understand them.

They seem to understand my Polish better than I am to understand their English.
I only say that because whenever I respond in Polish, they in turn answer correctly in Polish as well,
giving the impression that I made myself crystal clear.
jon357 74 | 22,054
29 Feb 2024 #146
Anne Applebaum

One of the best writers on r*SSia of our time.

How does a guy from Bydgoszcz, join a club whose members are almost all British aristocracy?

I posed that question (and the answer is no secret at all - it's even slightly amusing) already. It's been mentioned in articles about him.

The guy only denounced his citizenship in 2006

Renounced, and it's hardly rare to have more than one passport. A shame he renounced it though, however politicians' opponents often bring such things up in order to try and question someone's loyalty, even though Radek Sikorski's loyalty is not in doubt.

a solid imitation of an educated Britisher.

I'd not go that far however we do produce the overwhelming majority of English language training materials and RP is still the prestige register of the language.
mafketis 37 | 10,884
29 Feb 2024 #147
How does Poland care nothing about this?

British and Polish interests harmonize more often than not... unlike Polish and russian interests which are always in conflict....

dual loyalties.

Triple! Polish, British and American! (remember wifey)
Bobko 25 | 2,047
29 Feb 2024 #148
I posed that question (and the answer is no secret at all - it's even slightly amusing) already.

So what is the answer?

Renounced

A typo.

Would you be fine if the next Foreign Secretary of the UK was a person born in Guangzhou?
jon357 74 | 22,054
29 Feb 2024 #149
So what is the answer?

Can you guess?

was a person born in Guangzhou?

Why not, if their loyalties weren't in doubt? After all, Henry Kissinger was born in Germany and Madeleine Albright was born in Czechoslovakia.
Bobko 25 | 2,047
29 Feb 2024 #150
Can you guess?

Not really.

After all, Henry Kissinger was born in Germany and Madeleine Albright was born in Czechoslovakia.

Fair enough.


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