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Poles speaking English - examples


OP pawian 161 | 9,907
26 Aug 2019  #61
I think Tusk might well be the historic exception to the rule.

No, there were a few before him. Check the posts on the first page.

All he cares about is The EU.

But in this thread we are talking about linguistic achievements, not political ones. :):)
Lyzko 23 | 6,627
26 Aug 2019  #62
Allright, think I will. Thanks
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,569
26 Aug 2019  #63
Allright

There is no such word.
Lyzko 23 | 6,627
26 Aug 2019  #64
America and Great Britain are two countries separated by the same language (but different spelling)!
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
5 Oct 2019  #65
PiS politician, Wojciechowski, a candidate (failed) for agriculture commissioner, speaks in the EU. Extremely heavy accent and many mistakes but I always appreciate when adults learn to speak communicative English. Respect despite his funny views on agriculture problems.

youtu.be/AFFXb3P86m0

Comment:
Mr Wojciechowski - blabla talk may be enough in current Polish government, but in EU Parliament the level is much higher. Please live up to their standards or shut up. Otherwise you will come up as an idiot. Which actually happened.
Ironside 48 | 9,788
5 Oct 2019  #66
Extremely heavy accent and many mistakes

He is 64. Show me any other politician his age that speaking English at all? Not many of these. Tusk leaned English on a go, having been tutored 24/7. Do you think he writes his twits or speeches? Phew, a hired dude or dudes paid from taxes of all EU countries do it for him. He is only learned to preform like an actor or a performer.

Make no difference as he is only a mouthpiece of German /Brussels pen-pushers interest.

Anyhoo, Wojciechowski was a judge and a politician in Poland. Where speaking English ain't requirement for the job.

By the way. The level of you partisan Soviet agitators is so low that it is practically no existent. All kind of creatures from PO or other parties that crawled into Brussels. No one has been going after them like that. Why? Some thing you just don't do. level of those idiots from other EU countries is not that great but at least they know when to shut up and they do not bark at their own countries. These Soviets' scum have no qualm about it. So you do. Low and disgusting.

He was a judge during a martial law in the 80' when Jaruzski took over to kill and kick out majority of those who was a threat to commies in Soviet Poland. So that is only one thing you could have said about him. Nah, you are jabbering some crap just because he joined PiS. If he was from PO you would sing his prise.
delphiandomine 83 | 17,667
6 Oct 2019  #67
He was a judge during a martial law

Amazing how you defend Communist judges and prosecutors when they're on the side of PiS.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
6 Oct 2019  #68
He was a judge during a martial law in the 80'

But this thread is about speaking English, not political history. :):) You got carried away too far on Saturday night.
Ironside 48 | 9,788
6 Oct 2019  #69
Amazing how you defend Communist judges and prosecutors when they're on the side of PiS.

I don't. Since not a one of all those commie criminals has been touched it is pointless to go after some little commies. Also amongst them he is quite a sensible and knowledgeable persona.

about speaking English,

I'm pretty sure Tusk's English is very bad.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
6 Oct 2019  #70
If he was from PO you would sing his prise.

Another lie from you. Read my post 54 from 2015 about Tusk

Though Donald Tusk was able to learn how to speak for an arranged interview, he seems a bit lost when running a live discussion

Ironside 48 | 9,788
6 Oct 2019  #71
Another lie from you.

A lie? Are you reborn Harry? It is my opinion. Also I'm pretty sure I'm right, have no way of proving it thought.

Yeah, a bit lost means he wouldn't be able to debate anything without any aid or preparations. Same thing - his E is pretty bad if he cannot hold a conversation on any given subject.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
6 Oct 2019  #72
Unfortunately for you, he can. My first comment about him was from 2015, now it is 2019. :) And I said recently:

That was in 2015. Tusk has made an incredible progress since then. Despite a heavy accent, he communicates with world leaders freely.

A lie? It is my opinion.

An opinion which I view as a lie. I have the right to it. hahaha I consider you a compulsive liar after I get proofs for that every day. :):)
Ironside 48 | 9,788
6 Oct 2019  #73
nfortunately for you, he can

Can you prove it? Have you been tutoring him or are u a privy to some info? IF not it is just your opinion against mine. So your right to call me a liar is imaginary. You can call me names but it is not your right but rather your true nature of a Soviet vile ch.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
6 Oct 2019  #74
Can you prove it? Have you been tutoring him or are u privy to some info?

It is very silly of you to ask such questions and doubt my words coz it is possible to check it out for yourself on the net. If you don`t know how or are too lazy to do, it is your fault.

Examples

youtu.be/rVPspCA_QHI

youtu.be/-uBjgvtxmOg
Lyzko 23 | 6,627
6 Oct 2019  #75
Should also be a thread about Americans speaking Polish. The story of President Carter's interpreter naturally back in around '77 comes to mind, when the poor fella translated Carter's words literally, "I wish to reach out to the people of Poland...", coming out on the other end as "I lust after the Polish people.....".

The chap's name was David Seymour, as I recall, from NYU, and believe you me, that time Polish President Gierek was not amused by the gaff!
Lenka 3 | 1,545
6 Oct 2019  #76
I have problems seeing how one could become the other...
Lyzko 23 | 6,627
6 Oct 2019  #77
So do I, then again, I'm not a Polish native speaker. Neither was Mr. Seymour, apparently!
Lenka 3 | 1,545
6 Oct 2019  #78
I am and I have problems figuring out how that transformation took place. Do you have an article or something about it?
mafketis 20 | 7,317
6 Oct 2019  #79
seeing how one could become the other...

One version is that the interpreter was very fluent in Russian and/or Ukrainian but had weaker Polish and when he had problems finding the words he quickly polonized Russian/Ukrainian words... I have no idea if that's actually what happened but that's an explanation I've read....
Lenka 3 | 1,545
6 Oct 2019  #80
That's why I wanted some mayerial about it, to try to figure it out. I guess I should move my a** and find the aswers for myself if I want them :)
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
6 Oct 2019  #81
I am afraid Łyżko has related an anecdote which was known in 1970/80s to a few people but later on it got mostly forgotten and didn`t reach the net.
mafketis 20 | 7,317
7 Oct 2019  #82
an anecdote which was known in 1970/80s to a few people

I remember it being covered on American TV news (this before I knew three words of Polish) but from what I know about the PRL the government would not feel obliged to put that on TV or comment about it publicly so probably more Americans knew about it than Poles and so it never became a thing here...
Lyzko 23 | 6,627
7 Oct 2019  #83
Right, Maf!

Seymour was in fact originally a Russian/Ukrainian to English interpreter who was called in at the last minute to sub for the regular Polish interpreter.

As an interpreter and translator myself, I particularly remember the incident while studying the process of related language interference in college at the time:-)
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
7 Oct 2019  #84
"I wish to reach out to the people of Poland...", coming out on the other end as "I lust after the Polish people.....

BTW, I forgot to ask about the Polish translation coz I don`t get it in English.
mafketis 20 | 7,317
8 Oct 2019  #85
forgot to ask about the Polish translation

I remember searching a bit for that a couple of years ago and couldn't find anything. In the US they showed the puzzled reactions of the Polish diplomats on stage with Carter but no real audio.

As I said, it wasn't in the interest of the PRL government of the time to publicize the event and so most of the Polish public either never heard of it or simply forgot about it quickly.

Another reason for it becoming a thing in the US was the use of the word lust in the back translation to English. Carter had done an interview for Playboy magazine (actually well known for very good interviews of public figures) where he was discussing his Christian faith (he's a born again Southern Baptist IINM). He tried to explain that faith doesn't change basic emotions and explained that yes, he felt things like lust at times (the quote was something like 'lust in my heart' but that his faith helped him resist acting on baser urgers. The 'lust in my heart' part was taken out of context and many jokes were had at his expense....
Lyzko 23 | 6,627
8 Oct 2019  #86
The English "to yearn for" in Polish is "tesknic za", which is no doubt what Carter was trying to convey, I believe, when he expressed the common desires of Americans and Poles, "yearning for" freedom:-)

Perhaps I'm wrong.
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
8 Oct 2019  #87
coming out on the other end as "I lust after the Polish people.....".

Łyzko, it was you who related to us that anecdote, you should have remembered what they actually said in Polish. Sth like desire freedom - pożądać wolności? It still isn`t so scandalous to make Polish diplomats look at each other in disbelief.

How about this? There was a little faux pas, indeed, but it got blown out of proportion for personal reasons, e.g., sb didn`t like that Seymour?
mafketis 20 | 7,317
8 Oct 2019  #88
you should have remembered what they actually said in Polish

Like I said, I couldn't find the exact words anywhere (and the video without audible sound was played on US news...)

sb didn`t like that Seymour?

More likely the 'lust' reference as I explained in post #85

There was also a reference to "when I abandoned the United States" instead of "left" or "departed from"... does someone who knows Russian or Ukrainian now how that might come about?
OP pawian 161 | 9,907
8 Oct 2019  #89
when I abandoned the United States" instead of "left" or "departed from"...

It must link to Russian уходить [uhadits] which means leave but is similar to Polish uchodzić/uchodźca which means to escape (e.g.,from the country, like a refugee does).
Lyzko 23 | 6,627
9 Oct 2019  #90
That's one of the gaffs to which I was referring, Pawian!


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