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Cajun from Louisiana state seeking refuge/new life in Poland? Wishing to become Polish (is it possible?)


Melanson 1 | 3
22 Feb 2019  #1
Hello, I have Cajun French ancestry. And Roman Catholic background. I like my home state of Louisiana but recently economic decline has made it very uncomfortable for me to live here. My politics are very similar to the Polish nation. (strictly right-wing - not very happy with immigration especially Muslims.)

And this nation (USA) has become very hostile to the Cajun ethnicity and uncivilized way of life. (due to economic decline and love of socialism)

Is it possible I can get resources to learn Polish fluently, and become Polish? (I feel that I am a refugee and am being persecuted here, in the USA. And would really like to trade Louisiana state to become Polish.)

(I know some people would suggest "why not France?" but they are too left-wing for my liking.) Any comments? Thanks in advance.
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,233
22 Feb 2019  #2
Start with France and slide into Poland later. That is if you are white. If not, stay here or move to Africa where they speak French.
OP Melanson 1 | 3
22 Feb 2019  #3
I'm most definitely white I can assure you. No black or Native Amerindian admix whatsoever. (this is a common but annoying misconception. many people get Cajun confused for "Creole".)
cms neuf - | 908
22 Feb 2019  #4
Maybe Russia would be nice ?

There are a few Russians here who can give you the lowdown
OP Melanson 1 | 3
22 Feb 2019  #5
yes but this is not really a catholic country is it
cms neuf - | 908
22 Feb 2019  #6
I think you are yet another troll following a pattern - that their home country is decadent and they want to move to a reactionary paradise called Poland.

If not then one piece of advice - If catholicism is your main reason to move i would suggest somewhere more devout like Philippines or Ivory Coast.

About 50 percent of people go regularly to church but at least half of them are like me - just to give some structure to the weekend and keep older family happy.

I would say 25 percent of Poles are serious believers but that is also the 25 percent who are least able to speak English.
Spike31 2 | 860
22 Feb 2019  #7
I think you are yet another troll following a pattern

@cms neuf calling someone a troll. Now I've heard everything. I guess it takes one to know one.

Melanson has clearly stated that he is a Catholic and a white folk, so Poland would be a suitable place for him to seek refugee.
Atch 17 | 2,843
22 Feb 2019  #8
Spike that's not fair. Cms is a genuine poster on this forum who knows Poland well and makes informed comments about it. There was nothing troll-like about his response. It's quite an accurate summing up. Living in Poland in 2019 is not equivalent to living in small town America back in the 1950s. Polish observance of Catholicism is more about social convention and being seen to conform, than about any deeply held beliefs. I'm not saying that it's pretence,I think most people believe in God but they're not down on their knees with the Rosary beads every day and lots of them hardly ever go to church, even the older ones, especially if they live in a city and don't feel that they're under scrutiny by their neighbours.

Anybody who comes to Poland expecting to never see a brown or black face or meet a Muslim, will be disappointed. Unless you're prepared to spend your life in a village in the back of beyond you will encounter people of colour from time to time. You will also meet people who are openly gay etc. Also "Polish Politics" are not simply right-wing. It's not a one party state. All views are represented and as part of the EU, Poland is more centre-right than 'strictly right- wing' as the OP says his politics are. If he wants to try living in Poland, he should go ahead but he needs to do so on a realistic basis, not in search of a fantasy world.
Ziutek 9 | 160
22 Feb 2019  #9
Someone who is unhappy with immigration who wants to become an immigrant. What could possibly go wrong?
Spike31 2 | 860
22 Feb 2019  #10
@Atch Catholicism has influenced Poland on every level; from political to social and cultural identity. Like in any other society there are different types of believers: devoted Catholics, lukewarm Catholics and lapsed Catholics who, while non-practicing regularly, still appreciate cultural fabric of Poland which is based on Roman Catholicism.

Prof. Boguslaw Wolniewicz, a Polish philosopher, often half-jokingly introduced himself "I'm a secular Catholic". He appreciated Roman Catholicism as a cultural foundation of Polish society.

Roman Dmowski, one of the fathers of Polish Independence in 1918, has wrote "Catholicism is the inseparable essence of Polishness. To remove the Catholic religion and its ethics is to destroy the nation itself"

Anybody who comes to Poland expecting to never see a brown or black face or meet a Muslim, will be disappointed

That depends. Big cities, such as Warsaw have a small minority of non-European foreigners (in Warsaw it's mostly Vietnamese). Those cities also attract tourists from around the world so they may be confused with the actual citizens. Same goes with students from India and African countries.

That said, the most common types of foreigner in Poland are Ukrainians of which there is over a million of them.
Atch 17 | 2,843
22 Feb 2019  #11
Catholicism has influenced Poland on every level; from political to social and cultural identity

Can you give specific examples of how that manifests itself in modern Poland and in the day to day lives of the people? As I come from a profoundly Catholic country myself, where the influence of the Church is now considered to be on the wane, I can still see how our Catholic identity influences our lives. What of Poland?
Spike31 2 | 860
22 Feb 2019  #12
Can you give specific examples of how that manifests itself in modern Poland and in the day to day lives of the people?

It manifest itself in work of the greatest Polish poets such as Adam Mickiewicz and Jan Twardowski, which are reading at school.

It has manifested itself in a political Solidarity Movement which was created after John Paul II visit to then communist Poland in 1979.
"Let your Spirit descend! Let your Spirit descend! And renew the face of the earth. The face of this land!" he said.

In modern culture, artists like very popular neo-folk band Tulia or rock band Wilki make references to it.

It manifests itself in many Polish proverbs.

And let's not forget that Polish nationalism is much different than a German [protestant] one thanks to Christian Personalism.

I come from a profoundly Catholic country myself, where the influence of the Church is now considered to be on the wane

Yes, I know it's on the wane and it's a shame. Ireland was a country which kept the Christianity alive after the fall of Rome. Seeing it fall to a modern neo-marxist doctrine is painful to watch.
Dirk diggler 9 | 4,489
22 Feb 2019  #13
@Melanson

Absolutely. Citizenship takes several years though but you can speed it up by getting a job in Poland and someone to sponsor you. I wouldn't recommend getting citizenship via the marraige route as the divorce laws in Poland are just as bad if not worse towards men than in the us.

And yes Poland is one of the most homogenous countries in Europe. Sure there's a few blacks or Muslims here and there but it's not inundated with them like Western Europe or USA. Poland is still a white wonderland where Europeans namely poles and ukrainians are the vast majority. Out of a group of say 100 people in a city at least 80-90 will be poles/ukrainians with the rest migrant workers, tourists, expats, etc.
Atch 17 | 2,843
22 Feb 2019  #14
Seeing it fall to a modern neo-marxist doctrine is painful to watch.

You've never visited it have you? The Irish Catholic church only became 'Romanized' in the second half of the 19th century. Our kind of Catholicism is not the same as Poland's. What's happening now is more like a return to our grass roots Catholicism. But that's not for this thread. We're still one of the most religious nations in Europe, only second to Poland in terms of church attendance and prayer and streets ahead in good works, charity, volunteering etc. Reading reams of patriotic poetry in school- well, fine words butter no parsnips and Solidarity is long gone.
Spike31 2 | 860
22 Feb 2019  #15
You've never visited it have you?

No, I haven't but I read the news and I also have a few Irish friends. We do get along very well, there's a cultural connection between us. Much more direct connection than with Brits.

Our kind of Catholicism is not the same as Poland's

That's all fine. Only totalitarian systems [and minds] want to unify everything. Polish and Irish Catholicism has different flavour yet we still have much more in common than with Protestants or Eastern Orthodox.

Solidarity is long gone

Yet the accomplishments of "SierpieĊ„ 1980" are still alive. After that event the System has started to erode quickly, turned to violence showing its ugly face, and collapsed eventually.
Joker 1 | 1,055
22 Feb 2019  #16
@cms neuf calling someone a troll. Now I've heard everything. I guess it takes one to know one.

Its pretty sad when a poster comes to this forum to ask questions about Poland and all he gets is 15 posts of typical arguing from the peanut gallery.

Any comments? Thanks in advance.

I doubt you will find the information you are looking for on this troll forum.

Its mostly UK expats with big chips on their shoulders around here:)

Mods can you delete the comments that don't pertain to the topic?
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,233
22 Feb 2019  #17
Seeing it fall to a modern neo-marxist doctrine is painful to watch.

...but not surprising.

What's their message? Turn the other cheek? Money is evil? Build bridges, not fences? Fags, welcome? Islam is wonderful? Communion for the pro-abortion political wh**es? Send more boys?

Anything else to turn more people away?
Spike31 2 | 860
22 Feb 2019  #18
Mods can you delete the comments that don't pertain to the topic?

The man has clearly stated that he is Roman Catholic, and it seems that it is very important to him, so he may be interested in our post exchange with Atch. If it gets send to Random, then let it be.

@Rich Mazur

We have to remember that it is written in New Testament that Christ also said "Do not assume that I have come to bring peace to the earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword." Matthew 10:34

Let's not confuse the teachings with the institution which is in a state of slow decay since Second Vatican Council and especially now under [anti] Pope Francis. If the left have infiltrated government and education system after WWII do you think the same couldn't be done with the Church?
Atch 17 | 2,843
22 Feb 2019  #19
we still have much more in common than with Protestants

Actually we have a lot in common with Anglicans right down to nuns and monks and Communion etc. They're practically Catholics :))

I also have a few Irish friends

And are they neo-Marxists? I doubt it.
Rich Mazur 4 | 3,233
22 Feb 2019  #20
"Do not assume that I have come to bring peace to the earth; I have not come to bring peace, but a sword." Matthew 10:34

I agree with him except that this message needs an update: It's an AR-15 with a scope at the border with Mexico.
Ziemowit 12 | 3,492
22 Feb 2019  #21
Someone who is unhappy with immigration who wants to become an immigrant.

The PF has transferred itself into a platform of speech for immigrants from Poland who hate immigration, so no wonder it is a proper place for people like Manson.

lots of them hardly ever go to church, even the older ones, especially if they live in a city and don't feel that they're under scrutiny by their neighbours.

I think it is no longer the case, in bigger towns (not only major towns) for sure.
Spike31 2 | 860
22 Feb 2019  #22
@Melanson

It is virtually impossible to apply for Polish citizenship from outside of Poland unless you are a member of Polonia and/or qualify for Karta Polaka. That is if you have Polish roots (right of blood).

So in order to do so you have to live and work legally in Poland.

In your case you would have to move to Poland first to live here and to learn the language which is needed for passing citizenship test and voila!

More details in a link below

migrant.info.pl/how-to-obtain-polish-citizenship.html

And are they neo-Marxists? I doubt it.

Oh, no. I select my friends carefully :-)
OP Melanson 1 | 3
22 Feb 2019  #23
"So in order to do so you have to live and work legally in Poland."

Thank-you.
Spike31 2 | 860
22 Feb 2019  #24
Good luck. Polish job market is now thirsty for new employees, especially specialists. If you possess skills which are needed on the market the whole process may be smoother than you expect. Employers, especially big companies and employment agencies, will often do all the legal procedures for you just to get you on board.
cms neuf - | 908
22 Feb 2019  #25
I would say the opposite - few companies are going to go out on a limb to arrange a work permit for someone who does not speak Polish unless you have a serious specialism or are a lower cost alternative to locsl workers.

You can always try but your opening gambit at interviews about wanting to live in a white anti immigrant society is probably not going to help

So you have your advice and good luck. I am sure you will now hang around for a few weeks to provide your wisdom on muslims and other people who offend you
Lyzko 22 | 6,543
22 Feb 2019  #26
Ever since Trump took office, many Americans have sought a life "outside the box", as it were, and are looking towards foreign climbs to seek their present and future happiness.

Once The Old World was unable to provide for her citizens and they sought a new life in The New World. Nowadays, the promise of a better life in Europe surely holds promise who haven't been granted a gold-plated insurance plan because they're not an entrepreneurial techy:-)

Once, the States was paradise on Earth, roughly from around 1945-1960, the period of the greatest prosperity the world has ever known. Nowadays, people with serious money as well, celebs such as Sher and Madonna of all people, have vowed to leave the US... at least until the foul Trumpian winds from the anus if indescetion have blown over aka have passed their gas for the time being.

People who confess that they need help, aren't "weak", they're honest. Ideology has stifled our great country and all by squeezed out for no apparent reason anybody who isn't deemed Daniel Boone, Paul Bunyan, Laura Ingalls Wilder and Bill Gates all rolled into oneLOL
Dirk diggler 9 | 4,489
22 Feb 2019  #27
If you're a wealthy individual you can get citizenship in a place like Malta and thus EU residency by default.

@cms neuf

Not true. Tons of companies bend over backwards to get Indians into Poland to work it. Of course there's opportunities in other fields.
cms neuf - | 908
22 Feb 2019  #28
Yes - which i noted un my post because Indians are cheaper than Poles
Spike31 2 | 860
22 Feb 2019  #29
Poland needs conservative, right-wing traditionalists and Christians and not some incompatible minorities from completely different cultures who would create social tensions. Does that offend your liberal sensibility? :-)
Miloslaw 6 | 2,046
22 Feb 2019  #30
Poland needs conservative, right-wing traditionalists and Christians and not some incompatible minorities

Agreed.


Home / Law / Cajun from Louisiana state seeking refuge/new life in Poland? Wishing to become Polish (is it possible?)
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