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Is the term 'Polak' derogatory??

Zgubiony Activity: 15 / 1,556
Joined: 20 Oct 2006 ♂
 
25 Jul 2007  #31

Because she knows you. She knows you mean no harm by it.

Well, more like she lives in Poland and never heard it used in a derogatory manner. She just know's that it's used in reference to a person from Poland. I do see your point though. Racial slurs IMO are just a bit more harsh.

ArturSzastak Activity: 3 / 593
Joined: 16 Feb 2007 ♂
 
25 Jul 2007  #32

Racial slurs IMO are just a bit more harsh.

Yeah, but then the religious ones start the wars.

Well, more like she lives in Poland and never heard it used in a derogatory manner.

Ah, that would explain it :]
osiol Activity: 55 / 3,927
Joined: 25 Jul 2007 ♂
 
1 Aug 2007  #33

I don't really like the word Brit, however it is spoken. If I'm spoken to in English, I'd prefer to hear 'Englishman'. If I'm speaking English, I tend to say Polish man, Polish woman or Polish people. Maybe Poles.
Goonie Activity: 8 / 242
Joined: 6 Mar 2007 ♂
 
1 Aug 2007  #34

I'm a polak :)
baby  
3 Aug 2007  #35

czesc
co to jest jak sie masz bu ca tonas comnaser fntn nared
OP tornado2007 Activity: 11 / 2,278
Joined: 11 Jul 2007 ♂
 
3 Aug 2007  #36

Yeah, but then the religious ones start the wars.

Yeah now there's a whole other debate opened up right there, RELIGION is the source of most of the wars in history, either linked to, religious beliefs or other elements of religion.

I don't need to list some examples because i'm sure you are all aware of what i mean. Imagine, NO RELIGION, less wars, however its true that if we not waring over Religion it will be about something else.

Just stop for a second and see how ridiculous this all is, we have been waring for centuries over a few fairy tails written by a few people who were bored and as good at telling stories as Terry Prattchet and Steven King.

I could right on and on about Religion and the negative affects on human life and culture but really there would be to much to write :)
kadele  
8 Aug 2007  #37

As has been pointed out several times, Polak is a Polish man, but it is not enough to say "a person hailing from Poland" because that exludes Polki, who are of course the women hailing from Poland. But that's not at issue here, I know.

I agree with the comparison ArturSzastak made with not using the N word to a black person unless you're black. It's unfortunate that a word should be reserved as appropriate to only certain people, but that is the way it is.

I also don't think it's the same thing for a Ukrainian or Russian or any other Slav to use the term Polak because they are coming from a shared linguistic background, and it is safe to assume that their intentions are neutral. English speakers cannot claim this.

I am Polka, not Polak. The only time anyone ever calls me Polak it is not out of curiousity about my heritage, but in order to reference the "Polack joke" mentality. I find it offensive coming from someone who doesn't know what it means and isn't using it correctly.

It's perfectly fine to mix languages, most multilinguals do so, but if you don't know Polish, this should not be the one Polish word you insert into conversation.

Bottom line, if there's any controversy about a word, I would avoid it just in case. No one will get offended because you DON'T use the word Polak, but since some people might, I'd stay away from it. Unless, of course, you're speaking in Polish.
osiol Activity: 55 / 3,927
Joined: 25 Jul 2007 ♂
 
8 Aug 2007  #38

the N word

Amongst black people, it is still a derogatory term used by those who see themselves as more respectable. Those who do not wish to be seen as (that kind of) respectable give it that same meaning, but don't mind calling themselves N-.
OP tornado2007 Activity: 11 / 2,278
Joined: 11 Jul 2007 ♂
 
8 Aug 2007  #39

Polak is a Polish man

So its not that derogatory then, ppphhhhwwww well at least i've not offended anybody :)
southern Activity: 76 / 7,117
Joined: 17 May 2007 ♂
 
8 Aug 2007  #40

In Ukraine they talk about Poliaci and they pronounce like Paliaci,which seemed to me derrogatory.When they say ukrainki they stop at ai like ukraaiinki,which lasts double than simply paliaci.
witek Activity: 1 / 588
Joined: 1 Apr 2007 ♂
 
8 Aug 2007  #41

In Ukraine they talk about Poliaci and they pronounce like Paliaci,which seemed to me derrogatory.

Ukrainans are weak people as they never had a country of their own. Poles, Lithuanians and Russians dominated over them for a 800 years untill Ukraine was created in 1991. And let us not confuse Kiev Rus which was established by the Varangians or Vikings as being Ukrainian because it wasn't.
southern Activity: 76 / 7,117
Joined: 17 May 2007 ♂
 
8 Aug 2007  #42

And let us not confuse Kiev Rus which was established by the Varangians or Vikings as being Ukrainian because it wasn't.

Ukrainians claim Kiev Rus,original russians were in fact ukrainians.
Matyjasz Activity: 2 / 1,544
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8 Aug 2007  #43

Plus, Cossacks where pretty tough madafakers. :)
witek Activity: 1 / 588
Joined: 1 Apr 2007 ♂
 
8 Aug 2007  #44

Ukrainians claim Kiev Rus,original russians were in fact ukrainians.

Kievan Rus was founded by a Varangian (Viking) warrior named Rurik , who first established the empire in Novgorod and then added Kiev.

[[i]b]These particular Varangians were called Rus, just as some are called Swedes, and others Normans and Angles, and still others Goths for they were thus named. The Chuds, the Slavs, the Krivichs and the Ves then said to the Rus, "Our land is great and rich, but there is no order in it. Come reign as princes, rule over us". Three brothers, with their kinfolk, volunteered. They took with them all the Rus and came[/b].

Viking founded Kiev Rus is a predecessor state to Belarus, Ukraine and Russia.[/i]
witek Activity: 1 / 588
Joined: 1 Apr 2007 ♂
 
8 Aug 2007  #45

Ukrainians claim Kiev Rus,original russians were in fact ukrainians.

we cannot even prove today that Mieszko and the Piast dynasty were indeed Polish.

Most probable is that the Piasts were Vikings similar to the Russian Rukirks.



Guest  
12 Aug 2008  #46

that a look at this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polack

it clears things up.
Sarah Catherine Activity: - / 2
Joined: 18 Aug 2008 ♀
 
29 Aug 2008  #47

I don't think that's derogatory and neither does my polish bf. I'm a Canadian and ppl call us canucks, i don't know any Canadians that find this derogatory. If they do maybe they're just hypersensitive to everything and like to cause s9it.
IronsE11 Activity: 2 / 442
Joined: 3 Mar 2008 ♂
 
29 Aug 2008  #48

As with 99% of these cases, it's all to do with the context of it's use...
Guest  
21 Nov 2008  #49

Yes in this country it is definitively used as a derogatory word. Example;.( You do not know something )
...oh! you must be Polak.
osiol Activity: 55 / 3,927
Joined: 25 Jul 2007 ♂
 
21 Nov 2008  #50

in this country

The People's Republic of Guestia?
Guest  
8 Mar 2009  #51

The word "Polak" can be derogatory. I've heard people use the word in reference to one being unintelligent, or doing some thing stupid or wrong. For example, if someone put their shirt on backwards and didn't realize it someone could call them a Polak. I don't know how it originated, but it can be derogatory depending on how it's used.
Nickidewbear  
17 Sep 2009  #52

"ty pierdolony Polak"

I'm curious about what that means.
Juche Activity: 9 / 292
Joined: 17 Feb 2009 ♂
 
17 Sep 2009  #53

It means "You f&cking Pole," which is just like saying "You f&cking Yank" in some contexts. but heres an interesting line from our friends at Wikipedia:

In early 20th century, some ethnic slurs were popularized to describe Polish people in the U.S., such as "Polacks" or the term "white niggers" - used by the White Anglo-Saxon Protestants (WASPs) due to the fact that Polish-American men were marrying African-American women regardless of their race,[54] but most notably, it was the spread of Polack (or Polish) jokes.
Nickidewbear Activity: 20 / 524
Joined: 17 Sep 2009 ♀
 
18 Sep 2009  #54

What's funny, though, is that a number of us were actually Jewish and hated by gentile Poles as well. So, maybe that's why Great-Great-Granddad and Great-Great-Great-Grandma pretended to be Polish Catholics: they'd rather get the rap for being "Polacks" then "k___s"; and I don't blame them. I'm not saying that calling anyone a "Polack" or even "Polak" in a derogatory sense is right; but I think that Great-Granddad pretended to be a Pole for that reason when he married Great-Grandma, a Slovakian-American gentile (though perhaps Jewish) Catholic: her parents did not like Jews too much (because, unless they were trying to dodge being Jewish as well; the Jews were the Christ-killing and unredeemed people to them, since they were hard-core Slovakian Roman Catholics).
Juche Activity: 9 / 292
Joined: 17 Feb 2009 ♂
 
18 Sep 2009  #55

Polak, kike, Yank, wop, its all the same. Depends on the context, intentions of the speaker, whatever. If someone uses the term endearingly its no big deal. If there's spite in the voice then you know what the person is all about.
Nickidewbear Activity: 20 / 524
Joined: 17 Sep 2009 ♀
 
18 Sep 2009  #56

Well, "k___" is like "n_____"; and "Polak" spelled inappropriately is like using "Jew" or "Negro" (even "Black") as a pejorative. So, I don't see where your argument holds up.
Polonius3 Activity: 979 / 11,644
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
25 Mar 2010  #57

Mar 25, 10, 21:15 - Thread attached on merging:
Is 'Pollack' offensive?

In the mouth of an English speaker do you find the term 'Pollack' offensive? I migth have added 'German speaker' as well. They've even got a nasty term for Poland: Polakei instead of the standard Polen.
convex Activity: 20 / 3,988
Joined: 25 Nov 2009 ♂
 
25 Mar 2010  #58

They've even got a nasty term for Poland: Polakei instead of the standard Polen.

That would be "Polacke" ...and it's not really that nasty.
Bratwurst Boy Activity: 5 / 7,946
Joined: 2 Apr 2007 ♂
 
25 Mar 2010  #59

They've even got a nasty term for Poland: Polakei instead of the standard Polen.

I don't think it's "nasty"....There is also "Russerei" used or in the past "Tschechei" (as Tschecheslovakei was always to long)
wildrover Activity: 98 / 4,462
Joined: 7 Jun 2007 ♂
 
25 Mar 2010  #60

So what do you call a bunch of Polish people then...? I have heard on tv Polish people refering to themselves and others as Pollacks , so i am not sure if its offensive or not...?

Among my Polish friends , we call each other all manner of things , and it would not matter at all if i call them a Pollack , or even a burak , but i would not want to cause offence to a stranger...What is the correct word to call Polish people...????




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Is the term 'Polak' derogatory??
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