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Is the term 'Polak' derogatory??



jon357 59 | 11,416    
17 May 2015  #211

Any Polish jokes made up by the group you mention would doubtless not be in English. Also, I've never heard a Pole say 'Polock' (though I rarely hear them speak English these days) - I suspect you've never heard the word in Poland either.

Are you confusing it with Polak? Though remember, that's a Polish rather than an English word.


Wulkan - | 3,021    
17 May 2015  #212

Any Polish jokes made up by the group you mention would doubtless not be in English.

Why not? Do you have your own theory of the Polish jokes genesis?
jon357 59 | 11,416    
17 May 2015  #213

Why not? Do you know many jokes in English made by Germans?

As for theories, I know abstract thinking doesn't come easily to you, however I wonder if you've ever noticed that those jokes tend to be universal ones; for many years and in many places about many groups.
Wulkan - | 3,021    
18 May 2015  #214

Do you know many jokes in English made by Germans?

No but maybe there was no anti English propaganda during the times of nazi Germany?

I know abstract thinking doesn't come easily to you

I'm actually an abstract thinker so you're wrong again.

however I wonder if you've ever noticed that those jokes tend to be universal ones; for many years and in many places about many groups.

Yes, I did notice but that's not what I'm asking.
jon357 59 | 11,416    
18 May 2015  #215

That post doesn't say what you're thinking at all. The first comment makes no sense whatsoever - why would any wartime anti-Polish propaganda from Germany be in English? Britain declared war as soon as Poland was invaded and although it took the U.S. much longer they wanted nothing to do with Poland - certainly no reason for the Germans to make Polish jokes as propaganda in English-speaking countries.

You seem to be clutching at straws - that or you just don't know what you mean.
Wulkan - | 3,021    
18 May 2015  #216

Briefly saying: The nazi Germans who escaped to USA after second world war was finished were quite brainwashed with Anti-Polish and Anti-Jewish propaganda and after few years when they started feeling comfortable and learned English they started with the Polish and Jewish jokes which are in many cases the same. That is one theory and whether it's truth or not it's not up to you to decide because you lack elementary knowledge about it as you already demonstrated.
jon357 59 | 11,416    
18 May 2015  #217

That's beyond clutching at straws, isn't it, to pretend that Polish jokes originated with Nazis "who escaped to USA". You say that's "one theory" but frankly a laughable one. I wonder if they wore their armbands when they were selling the joke books.

At least we know what happened to Martin Bormann now...
Wulkan - | 3,021    
18 May 2015  #218

You say that's "one theory" but frankly a laughable one.

Yet you have no other theory that could make any sense.

At least we know what happened to Martin Bormann now...

Whatever that has to do with the discussion other than you lack historical knowledge, Martin Bormann died in 1945 and never been to USA.
jon357 59 | 11,416    
18 May 2015  #219

Nothing to theorise about, O God of Fire. Those jokes are all universal, old, and told about the nearest group at hand. They exist in Poland too about a particular group.

"Escaped Nazis" indeed! Did they goose-step while they were telling them?
Wulkan - | 3,021    
18 May 2015  #220

Nothing to theorise about

Then you've got nothing to tell about this subject.
Harry 70 | 13,020    
18 May 2015  #221

those jokes tend to be universal ones; for many years and in many places about many groups.

Exactly, quite often the same jokes that were told in the USA about Polish people were being told in the UK with the nationality changed to Irish.

Looks like you had too much bum sex last night and it impacts your logical thinking today.

Could a moderator be so kind as to advise whether posting homophobic abuse is now acceptable behaviour here.

It's not acceptable - Wulkan - you have been warned
1ZPolski    
27 Sep 2015  #222

"YES when you are not a Polak and you call a polish person a "POLACK", that is very insulting. It's a deregatory term used for poles in America that is meant to demean or

Insult one as dumb, uneducated, or
Just plain retarded stupid. I would suggest you do not use it around Poles.
Polonius3 999 | 12,164    
28 Sep 2015  #223

"POLACK"

Maybe someone had actually written a dissertation on teh "Polack joke". It is general knowledge that it was the Germans who spreade insulting remarks about Poland after the end of World War One. For instance saying that assigning Silesia (˝Sl±sk) to Poland was like giving a pocketwatch to a monkey. They also coined the term "Polnische Wirtschaft" (literally Polish management or economics) to mean mismanagement, disorder and chaos. They also created derogotoary words for Poles -- Polacken and for the country itsef -- die Polackei (literally Polackland), the normal word being Polen. In recent decades German TV personality Harald Schmidt became known for his Polenwitze (Polack jokes) which potrayed Poles as dirty, drunken thieves. A typcial joke went: Visit Poland -- your car is already there. The Polack joke got a new lease of life in the US in the 1960s when it became the stock in trade of mainly Jeiwsh comics and entertainers. These include such shows as All in the Family, Rowan & Martin, Carol Brunett Show, Tonight Show and joke books such as "It's fun to be a Poalck".
TheOther 5 | 2,929    
28 Sep 2015  #224

It is general knowledge that it was the Germans who spreade insulting remarks about Poland after the end of World War One.

Polack - A Small Minded Movie ... polackthefilm.com/polack_the_film/HOME.html

And to relax: europeisnotdead.com/disco/expressions-of-europe/european-jokes/
Polonius3 999 | 12,164    
28 Sep 2015  #225

Don't the Russians also have the offensive term Poliaczyszka? I think Dostoevsky used it.
Polsyr 6 | 851    
28 Sep 2015  #226

Poliaczyszka

Is it always offensive? Or just disrespectful; belittling in a sense? I think it Depends on context really.

In some sociocultural context, even basic "польский" or "поляк" (Polskiy or Polyak) can be used in an offensive sense. That is how much they socioculturally love Poles.
Polonius3 999 | 12,164    
28 Sep 2015  #227

"поляк"

Is there a truly offensive term for Pole in Russian. In Polish it is kacap for Russian, whilst Rusek is belittling but not outright pejorative. How can "польский" and "поляк" be offensive? Sure, if you add some adjective such as пpoклятый and say "пpoклятый поляк". Is there no neutral term or are the Rooskies so permeated with Poliniphobia....
Polsyr 6 | 851    
28 Sep 2015  #228

Is there no neutral term or are the Rooskies so permeated with Poliniphobia

Dokładnie. Exactly. The term is in theory neutral, but in sociocultural sense, well, yes it is exactly what you're thinking.

Would you believe that one of my old Russian buddies (born and raised Moskowite) refused to come to my wedding because my wife is Polish? Well, that is admittedly extreme, but reflective of some of the more extreme but not uncommon sociocultural attitudes.
Gronsky    
24 Nov 2016  #229

I grew up in a Polish American community. Polish was spoken in my house growing up. Recently someone (not Polish) told me I can't call myself a Pole or a Polak anymore because it isn't politically correct according to her liberal ideologic Sensitivity Training. She recieved the training at the university where she us employed. I was insulted that some academic ideologue says I can't refer to myself as I grew up to view myself. Granted, the word Polak can be an insult in a certain context. But not in most everyday speach. I am a Polak and proud of my heritage.

Btw. The word was used at least since the mid 14th Century. I have read Venetian court cases from the period. There was one case of two Polish merchants who were arrested and and convicted of a crime. They were called Polaks in the court record. If the word was used in a court document the word must have seen wider use. The Venetians probably got the word from the Polish themselves.
Marsupial - | 885    
24 Nov 2016  #230

Funny why russians would make fun of poles. With rubbish economy and one of the richest mineral countries they just can't get their act together. They are useless.
MarryPoppins    
1 Mar 2017  #231

I'm Polish decent and I don't care if people say 'Polak'




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