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Polish Swear Words


HumbertHumbert    
15 Dec 2009  #1,081
Halo, this is probably an awful translation but would
Jestem nędzny pierdolenie gnój
be I'm a lousy fucking bastard? It is only a word by word attempt. Ja spierdolić, and I can't even apologise to her.

Dziękuję
jonni 16 | 2,491    
15 Dec 2009  #1,082
Jestem nędzny pierdolenie gnój

Yes, that's a fair interpretation. Word for word, it would be "I'm a wretched fucking shit".
George8600 10 | 638    
15 Dec 2009  #1,083
KURWAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!! :-D

Sorry if that was a bit out of my league....
Nika 2 | 507    
15 Dec 2009  #1,084
I prefer KURRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRWA (accent on the R) or
NOSZ KURRRRRRRRRRRRRWA MAĆ - when I'm really angry it relaxes me!

and I'm sorry as well ;)
HumbertHumbert    
16 Dec 2009  #1,085
Much appreciated jonni.
Kokazoo :D    
29 Dec 2009  #1,086
Kurwiszon = it is kurwa + monkey in one <lol>
Example: You are kurwiszon/em
--------------------------------------------
Cipa = Pussy
--------------------------------------------
Dickhead = ''Chuj'' in lot of means
$1: This is dick = to jest chuj
$2: You are dickhead = Ty chuju

To = this
Jest = is
Ty = You
Chuj = (everybodys know) ;)
SzwedwPolsce 11 | 1,595    
31 Dec 2009  #1,087
Kurwiszon = it is kurwa + monkey in one

Very creative.
1jola 14 | 1,883    
31 Dec 2009  #1,088
I don't know if this has been posted before but it's a classic.
jonni 16 | 2,491    
31 Dec 2009  #1,089
Sounds just like my ex but with less swearing.
someone    
7 Jan 2010  #1,090
When a polish guy is crossed with a woman instructing him, and speaks the word Kurwa at her (this from a guy that speaks reasonably good english), is that an insult?

Yes when 'kurwa' is said to a person it is an isult contrary to the expression you bitch which may also be an insult but does not have to.

When kurwa is used with laughter, it is because someone is astonished by the situation or simply something cracked them up so much that only a sware word is strong enough to express their feelings.

If someone angrily says to you gowno, they probably mean not your fucking business it is often use in such a conversational context: What did you say? or What? response is in EN not your fucking business and in PL gowno
ata    
9 Jan 2010  #1,091
ty=you...

"ciąg się knocie"
"pierdolec" - ty pierdolcu
"pokurwieniec" - ty pokurwieńcu
"obszczymurek" - ty obszczymurku
"kurwiszcze" - ale z niej kurwiszcze
"szmaciara" - ty szmaciaro
"jebany lachociąg" - ty jebany lachociągu
"pizda grochowa" - ty pizdo grochowa
"ciota zajebana" - ty cioto zajebana
"kurwidołek"
"kupa gówna - ty kupo gówna
etc :)
bąbelki    
9 Jan 2010  #1,092
i dont understand what you mean here
use it as a coma in a sentence,,,,,,,,,,,,

I think not a comma but more like a pause in speechą

I learned a new one cant spell it in Polish though

Ty chuju/chuj = You cock, or more grammatically correct would be, Jesteś chuju/chuj = you are a cock. If it is a statement more emphasis on the first word, JESTEŚ chuju(you are a cock). If it is a question then more emphasis on the last word, jesteś CHUJU?(are you a cock?)
Lenka 2 | 1,067    
9 Jan 2010  #1,093
Ty chuju/chuj = You cock, or more grammatically correct would be, Jesteś chuju/chuj = you are a cock.

It's not quite correct:
Jesteś Chujem
bąbelki    
9 Jan 2010  #1,094
how do you say "fuckin right I'm polish"??

If you need to ask then your not!

It's not quite correct:
Jesteś Chujem

trzech lat uczę się polskiego, ale wciąż muszę dowiedzieć się więcej
Lenka 2 | 1,067    
9 Jan 2010  #1,095
trzech lat uczę się polskiego, ale wciąż muszę dowiedzieć się więcej

You are doing great:D Keep on going.
bąbelki    
9 Jan 2010  #1,096
I was just thinking how a Polish person would swear in this circumstance,
like if you would hit your thumb with a hammer, while driving a nail.

Probably they would say "Kurwa mać" pronounced in English "coorrva match"
strzyga 2 | 993    
9 Jan 2010  #1,097
it would be either "o kurwa!" or "o Jezu!", take your pick
Hedyn - | 1    
13 Jan 2010  #1,098
Also whats the word for horny?

Jestem bardzo napalona means I am very horny.

Napalona is the word for horny
king polkakamon - | 546    
13 Jan 2010  #1,099
Jestem bardzo napalona means I am very horny.

Damn.I thought it meant I am very tired.
luvapole    
16 Jan 2010  #1,101
My friend of over 20 years has called me something, but has never told me what it means. Please forgive my phonetic spelling... it may or may not be a swear word or something bad, but I have a feeling it is ;p

sma-SHUSH-key

Thank you!

P.S. and if it is bad, what should I call him in return?! :)
frd 7 | 1,399    
16 Jan 2010  #1,102
sma-SHUSH-key

I have absolutely no clue what this might mean, doesn't sound like a polish word to me ;) You've probably misheard something or put the wrong pronunciation in. Beside some people are inventing their own words by adding something to a normal polish word.. if it was "SHUSH-key" it could mean "piddle".. by I highly doubt that and it wouldn't make any sense ;) for me it carries a certain notion of "smażenie" - "frying" but doesn't make any sense either.. take a voice recorder to your next meeting :P
gumishu 11 | 4,850    
18 Jan 2010  #1,103
luvapole

sma-SHUSH-key

smaczniutki????

very tasty (tongue tickling way) ;)
marqoz - | 195    
4 Feb 2010  #1,104
There were question about etymology of the word: kurwa.

There are 2 hypotheses:
1) From Protoslavic (and still used in Poland and many other Slavic languages) word KUR meaning COCK, postfix -WA means collective noun.
Calling a woman kurwa used to suggest that she knows many cocks=males ie. was a prostitute or a lascivious one. (French word COCOTTE has analogical history.)

2) From Latin word CURVA meaning CURVE or ASKEW - suggesting that the way of life of kurwa wasn't so straight - ie. with many curves and bits on the side.

Recently this hypothesis is treated as obsolete popular ad-ideation.
gumishu 11 | 4,850    
4 Feb 2010  #1,105
There were question about etymology of the word: kurwa.

There are 2 hypotheses:
1) From Protoslavic (and still used in Poland and many other Slavic languages) word KUR meaning COCK, postfix -WA means collective noun.
Calling a woman kurwa used to suggest that she knows many cocks=males ie. was a prostitute or a lascivious one. (French word COCOTTE has analogical history.)

neither of these etymologies makes sense marqoz - kurwa is the root word in Germanic languages - (k changed into h or wh in Geramanic history in some half of vocabulary - and you have now whore and eine Hure)

-ew (later changed into -va) was an ending that defined the feminine in a number of words (stągiew, panew, łagiew and kotwa, pochwa - are all feminine)

as the word is shared by Slavic and Germanic languages (Romance languages have different words) the most probable possibility is Slavs have borrowed it from Gothic folk when they were neighbours (and they were close neighbours in the history for quite some time)
marqoz - | 195    
5 Feb 2010  #1,106
neither of these etymologies makes sense marqoz

Thank you for your good word, Gumishu.

So my hypothesis are crap and only you have possessed this deep reaching insight in the past far before the history started, before barbarians of Germanic or Slavonic origin even know how to read. Nice to meet somebody with these skills.

Take it easy - it is only etymology - and with languages with so short history like Germanic and moreover Slavonic - you have only hypotheses out there.

And you are right that Latin hypothesis is funny one - some folk staff but very old one. It was very popular from early modern times together with another explanation for curva meaning corner - you know where all working girls stand.

I can tolerate your German root proposal but only as one more hypothesis - let it be number 3). I have heard about that - but it has no clear phonetic path from Gothic HORS to Slavonic KUREW.

But we have one more and very promising hypothesis:
4) In very old Polish KUR = cock and KUREW = hen
If Polish KUR, English COCK and Latin PETUX mean male gender of chicken,
and if simultaneously all these words mean also penis,
so KUREW could mean also the complement or other part of penis or vagina.

Now we are just close to final association and here you are:
If KOGUT = rooster or penis - is used to call a horny man or a cocksman in slangish,
so KUREW = hen or vagina - could be used to call a whore or a c*nt in slangish.
It is some kind of pars-pro-toto association.

And, hello, Gumishu, suffix -WA sometimes is a transformed female noun form with -EW (it could be the case of kurew) but in the other words it could be a collectiva like in DZIATWA = all the children, GĘSTWA - all the shrub, LITWA - all the Lithuanians, TATARWA - all the Tartars.
gumishu 11 | 4,850    
5 Feb 2010  #1,107
I can tolerate your German root proposal but only as one more hypothesis - let it be number 3). I have heard about that - but it has no clear phonetic path from Gothic HORS to Slavonic KUREW.

ok agreed - let's assume it comes from some Urindoeuropean root which evolved differently in Germanic languages and Slavic languages - this sounds pretty plausible, Slavic languages probably then retained the more archaic version (remember k- h change in proto-Germanic)

yes you are right that phonetically there could not be change from *ho/ur to kurew - all other borrowings from Gothic dialects attest that Geramnic h/ch were retained in Slavic as ch (see chlew, chleb - I know these examples)

having said all that I am not a professional linguist

LITWA - all the Lithuanians,

i doubt it is collectivum in this case - in my eyes it just seems shortening of Lietuva - I doubt Lithuanians borrowed the name of their country from their Slavic neighbours - it is however true that the word Litwa acted as a collectivum in Slavic languages

never heard of Tatarwa collectivum but I guess you didn't make it up
marqoz - | 195    
6 Feb 2010  #1,108
I doubt Lithuanians borrowed the name of their country from their Slavic neighbours - it is however true that the word Litwa acted as a collectivum in Slavic languages

You're probably right. The root of Lietuva is probably of Baltic origin.
Wikipedia proposes "Since the word Lietuva has a suffix (-uva), the original word should have no suffix. A likely candidate is Lietā." However the ending could Slavonic as well. If not it was well assimilated and used together with Moskwa, Tatarwa.

In old Polish also MOSKWA was used as a collectivum:
Moskwa się pocza dziwować skąd się wziął, jednakże rozumieli, że go do tego czasu było utajono. [from the period of Dymitriada (wars with Muscovy 1604-1610]

archive.org/stream/archivfrslavisc00pastgoog/archivfrslavisc00pastgoog_djvu.txt

And TATARWA: ..niedola nas ściga, najechała wraża tatarwa. A kozak śpi.. (Bolesław Londyński, Bajki Słowiańskie); see also: Stanisław Vincenz, Prawda Starowieku.
confused5767    
17 Feb 2010  #1,109
idk how to spell it, but sounded out it is "goopia cheifka"...what the hell does that mean?!
asik 2 | 220    
17 Feb 2010  #1,110
goopia cheifka"

Głupia dziwka

głupia - stupid
dziwka -strumpet/whore/slut



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