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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Chemikiem
28 Mar 2021 #1,231
You would have to ask Pawian as I was answering his idiom. That appears to be what you are doing now though.
johnny reb 31 | 5,740
28 Mar 2021 #1,232
That appears to be what you are doing now though.

Oh, heavens no, I didn't mean to make you feel so guilty.
I was merely asking if my idiom fell into the same category as yours. ;-)
Here is another idiom for you.
'Let's not blow it out of proportion'.
Chemikiem
28 Mar 2021 #1,233
I was merely asking if my idiom fell into the same category as yours. ;-)

Your trolling sentence isn't an idiom.

Here is another idiom for you.
'Let's not blow it out of proportion'.

You need to read the thread title. That isn't a Polish idiom.
Are you actually going to contribute to this thread or just carry on trolling?
Lenka 3 | 2,714
28 Mar 2021 #1,234
I have no idea about your idiom Chemikiem.

to hit a bull
jon357 67 | 17,039
28 Mar 2021 #1,235
To head butt someone?

In English, that's a Liverpool Kiss (or a Glasgow Kiss).

If you say hit a bull in English, that means idiomatically to get a perfect result. From darts, hitting the bull's eye.
johnny reb 31 | 5,740
28 Mar 2021 #1,236
That isn't a Polish idiom.

You are British right ?
Polish people here in the U.S.A. use it for an idiom all the time.
It wasn't intended to make you feel so guilty.
Chemikiem
28 Mar 2021 #1,237
I have no idea about your idiom Chemikiem.

Trzeźwy jak sędzia - as sober as a judge. It means someone is completely sober, not had anything to drink.

To head butt someone?

I would agree with that one.
johnny reb 31 | 5,740
28 Mar 2021 #1,238
not had anything to drink.

That doesn't sound right.
More to the tune of no non sense and right on the money.
Correct me please.
Lenka 3 | 2,714
28 Mar 2021 #1,239
To head butt someone?

No. That would be to hit sb from a bull (walnąć kogos z byka)

Maybe there is a better translation but I don't want to make it too easy just yet.

Now something that really could be used here tonight. It's not really in the letter of this thread but definitely in the spirit. As you guys know I'm from Silesia and while I don't know Silesian too well I know few things and here is one

wyciepać na hasiok
jon357 67 | 17,039
28 Mar 2021 #1,240
I know (or think I know) hasiok. Is it a dustbin? In Poznań they called bins something else, gimela, maybe.

But the idiom doesn't seem clear. Is it about wasting something or losing it?
Chemikiem
28 Mar 2021 #1,241
wyciepać na hasiok

Does it mean to throw out the garbage/garbage can?

More to the tune of no non sense and right on the money.

Wrong.
merriam-webster.com/dictionary/%28as%29%20sober%20as%20a%20judge

Polish people here in the U.S.A. use it for an idiom all the time.

You'll have no problem giving the idiom in Polish then.
mafketis 29 | 9,851
28 Mar 2021 #1,242
Trzeźwy jak sędzia.

I always heard "Drunk as a judge"....
jon357 67 | 17,039
28 Mar 2021 #1,243
Sober as a judge, drunk as a lord.

But people play with idioms.
Lenka 3 | 2,714
28 Mar 2021 #1,244
to throw out the garbage/garbage can?

Yes :)

As to the proper idiom different translation is
to shoot a bull

And no, it has nothing to do with scoring ;)
jon357 67 | 17,039
28 Mar 2021 #1,245
Shooting a bull? Is it about making a mistake or getting something completely wrong?
Chemikiem
28 Mar 2021 #1,246
to shoot a bull

To screw something up?
jon357 67 | 17,039
28 Mar 2021 #1,247
Or in a crude English language (Yorkshire dialect, the prestige form of English) equivalent idiom: "to drop a bollock".
Lenka 3 | 2,714
28 Mar 2021 #1,248
Good guys! Strzelić byka- to make a mistake. It is used mostly about orthography mistake
Chemikiem
28 Mar 2021 #1,249
Szkielet w szafie/szafce
johnny reb 31 | 5,740
29 Mar 2021 #1,250
You'll have no problem giving the idiom in Polish then.

No problem Tiger.

"wysadzić coś z (wszystkich) proporcji"

aby sytuacja wydawała się znacznie gorsza niż jest
Chemikiem
29 Mar 2021 #1,251
I asked for the Polish idiom. All you have done is translate an English sentence.

As an example of what I mean look at Lenka's idiom:

Strzelić byka- to make a mistake.

To shoot a bull is the Polish idiom. The English definition is to make a mistake.
mafketis 29 | 9,851
29 Mar 2021 #1,252
All you have done is translate an English sentence.

Narcissists can't stand to be left out of anything....
Lenka 3 | 2,714
29 Mar 2021 #1,253
To have a secret.

to do something from the as* side
johnny reb 31 | 5,740
29 Mar 2021 #1,254
Narcissists can't stand to be left out of anything....

Is this why you butted in here with your diminishing remark? lol

I asked for the Polish idiom.

I told you already and even posted a source.

Polish people here in the U.S.A. use it for an idiom all the time.

That would make it Polish. yes
Chemikiem
30 Mar 2021 #1,255
To have a secret.

Yes :) Something that someone has kept hidden and doesn't want others to know about.

to do something from the as* side

I'm not sure if this is the equivalent of ' to do something a$$ backwards '. To do something totally wrong or in the exact opposite way to how something should normally be done?

I told you already and even posted a source.

Either you are being deliberately obtuse or you can't understand plain English in addition to Polish.
This is the idiom I was looking for:

Robić z igły widły

Here is another idiom for you.
'Let's not blow it out of proportion'.

BTW, it's not an idiom.
jon357 67 | 17,039
30 Mar 2021 #1,256
What about:

"Don't make a village"?
Lenka 3 | 2,714
30 Mar 2021 #1,257
To do something totally wrong

Yes :)

"Don't make a village"?

Good one. I will give others a chance.
Chemikiem
30 Mar 2021 #1,258
Don't make a village"

Don't make a scene or behave embarrassingly?
Lenka 3 | 2,714
30 Mar 2021 #1,259
Yeah :)

Now very easy one
the bad ballerina is disturbed by the hem of her skirt
OP pawian 178 | 16,053
30 Mar 2021 #1,260
Are you actually going to contribute to this thread or just carry on trolling?

I see johhny is intent on causing eternal trouble in this thread. According to the saying: when the cat is away, the mice will frolic. :):):)

During my absence, I used or recalled a lot of idioms which we had never exploited here, but was too busy to put them down.

However, this one will suffice for a while:to pull a wire. hahaha

the bad ballerina is disturbed by the hem of her skirt

It means that when sb can`t swim very well, they say the water is too thick.


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