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Game - guess Polish idioms/sayings in direct English translation


Chemikiem
14 Jul 2019 #511
Knocked over, knocked into, or something else entirely?
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
14 Jul 2019 #512
The closest is knock on.
Chemikiem
15 Jul 2019 #513
Someone is leaned on, pressurized into doing something they don't really want to do? Don't think it's right, but no other ideas.
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
15 Jul 2019 #514
No, it means stuknięty, crazy, nuts etc.

Not to fall asleep with pears in the ash.
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
15 Jul 2019 #515
Before I forget: to tear out one`s veins.
Chemikiem
15 Jul 2019 #516
it means stuknięty, crazy, nuts etc.

Ok, thanks.

Not to fall asleep with pears in the ash.

Grab a chance or opportunity and don't miss out by putting things off? In other words, go for it!

to tear out one`s veins.

Slog one's guts out, work fingers to the bone etc?
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
15 Jul 2019 #517
Double yes! :)

to feel mint to sb
Chemikiem
15 Jul 2019 #518
to feel mint to sb

To be attracted to them.
Huur - | 19
16 Jul 2019 #519
Of course, you are perfectly right. But I used colloquial expression where a bumble bee is called bąk. Yes, a horse fly would be better.

But in this saying bąk is neither bumble bee, nor horse fly. Try again Pawian :-)
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
16 Jul 2019 #520
You mean those little birds? :):) Yes, that is the real meaning.
Thanks. And welcome to the forum but I suppose you are quite familiar with it. :):)

How about trying your skills in another riddle thread?
mafketis 25 | 9,324
16 Jul 2019 #521
But in this saying bąk is neither bumble bee, nor horse fly. Try again Pawian :-)

is it farts?
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
16 Jul 2019 #522
No, bąk has about 6 meanings - one of them is a small bird, huntable but of little value. The proper translation of the idiom should be to shoot Eurasian bitterns. Funny.
Huur - | 19
16 Jul 2019 #523
@pawian
Not so little :-)
Yes, I've found this forum few years ago looking for informations about... storks in Poland :-D

And this "bąk" surprisingly has a lot common with "make a bull"
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
16 Jul 2019 #524
Right, not so little. But still smaller than a stork. Actually, I have never been a birdwatcher - it is the only group in the animal kingdom that I haven`t found as fascinating as other.

with "make a bull"

Yes, I found out bąk was also called byk. Funny.

Stay with us and help create or solve new riddles here and elsewhere.
Huur - | 19
16 Jul 2019 #525
@pawian
Reportedly this bird sound exactly like bull od ox.
As a "non-urban form of life" I have contact with birds daily also no being a birdwatcher.

But lets end this ornitology off-top, he he
kaprys 3 | 2,511
16 Jul 2019 #526
How about fig with poppy seed (and parsnip)?
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
16 Jul 2019 #527
But lets end this ornitology off-top,

Sth ends, sth begins.Where is it from? :) Sorry, I can`t resist this little test. :)

How about fig with poppy seed (and parsnip)?

And its graphic representation is this:
the so called Polish finger sign: hahaha



Huur - | 19
16 Jul 2019 #528
@pawian

Sapkowski I suppose.

So my test - where is urban form of life from? :-D
gumishu 11 | 5,701
16 Jul 2019 #529
Reportedly this bird sound exactly like bull od ox.

it does sound like a bull/cow - first hand experience here
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
16 Jul 2019 #530
Yes, Sapkowski, my fav author. :)

Hmm, urban form of life, as the name suggests, comes from a city. :) You originally come from Warsaw, but moved to the countryside.
Huur - | 19
16 Jul 2019 #531
@pawian

Sapkowski - not bad but I know many equal good if not better.

Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett in "Good omens": Explanation for Londoners and other urban forms of life. This is really great piece of inteligent very joyful literature :-D

And as I have written I'm non-urban form od life. You know, wooden house and tile stove.

And what with a goat has come to cart? Was it in this threat?
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
16 Jul 2019 #532
Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett in "Good omens"

My kids and wife have read Terry Pratchett`s things, I saw those books on tables and beds, but I decided after Sapkowski that nobody else can write enjoyable literature. :):)

There were a few goats here but not this one.
Huur - | 19
16 Jul 2019 #533
@pawian

Sapkowski is overrated for me. Like Harry Potter. There are some literary fads in which perish literature good, but from outside this trends.

Ale już chyba za dużo ględzimy o tym co nie dotyczy tematu, c'nie?
mafketis 25 | 9,324
16 Jul 2019 #534
the so called Polish finger sign

You never see that anymore... anyway the meaning (as described to me when it was used) was 'no (soup) for you!'

(soup) is a stand in and comes from an old TV show.

the gesture is apparently very obscene in some countries (I want to say Brazil but I'm not completely sure).
Chemikiem
17 Jul 2019 #535
fig with poppy seed (and parsnip)?

You get sweet nothing, sweet FA ;)
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
17 Jul 2019 #536
You never see that anymore... '

Kids still show it in kindergarten. I did.

was 'no (soup) for you!'

Exactly, That`s what fig with poppy seed means.

You get sweet nothing, sweet FA ;)

What is FA? Sth obscene? :)
Chemikiem
17 Jul 2019 #537
These days it's a euphemism for f.ck all ( nothing ) but originally it meant sweet Fanny Adams.
mafketis 25 | 9,324
17 Jul 2019 #538
Kids still show it in kindergarten.

so now it's just a kid thing? I remember when adults used it too...

what about the 'fajny' gesture (thumb side of fist close to shoulder and elbow raised)? I haven't actually seen it in Poland in a looooong time but it used to be fairly common. IINM it's probably German (I've also seen it on German TV).
OP pawian 176 | 15,325
17 Jul 2019 #539
Fanny

I was right, it is a little obscene. :)

And what with a goat has come to cart? Was it in this threat?

An expression of satisfactiojn after sb eventually comes to you begging for sth, especially help.

so now it's just a kid thing? I remember when adults used it too.

Do we talk about showing or using? Showing is a kid behaviour, the same as putting your tongue out

what about the 'fajny' gesture (thumb side of fist close to shoulder and elbow raised)?

Certainly it is not forgotten. .

Obscene continued:
To have it shytted in the head/napper.
Huur - | 19
17 Jul 2019 #540
In head you can also had gudgeons


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