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Bilingual Polish-English books with audio for listening and reading learning method


samotnik 5 | 7
26 Jan 2024 #1
I am looking for bilingual books in Polish and English that also have an audio track available either as a purchase or "free" public read-along on youtube for example.

The paper book or ebook would have Polish on one page and English on the other page. Some words may be in colored or bold print if they have the exact same meaning.

The audio track is listened to while reading. Anything that is not understood can be read in English and an additional Pol-Eng dictionary can be consulted.

A bilingual ebook may be best for quick copy and paste of words into an online or offline dictionary and other tools.

I found this Italian-English youtube video as an example: youtube.com/watch?v=KBR4NYbERYI

This method can be used at any level of language skill and in my case I need to expand my vocabulary and reading skills.
Even if you are limited with your communication with people for whatever reason you still need to be able to read and engage with signs, paperwork and digital platforms to complete many basic life tasks, so the self-learning read and listen method can be helpful if you don't have a teacher or want to bother people in public with questions that they may not even know the answer to or even want to answer anyway.

I will update this thread if I find any titles or sections in a book store.
So far I have found many Polish paper and ebooks with their audiobook versions, but not a bilingual edition with English translation.
A workaround is to purchase two separate paper or ebooks in each language if a translation is available.

You can also find many "free" ebooks and audiobooks, here are a few examples:

youtube.com/results?search_query=polski+audiobook
wolnelektury.pl/katalog/
wolnelektury.pl/katalog/audiobooki
wordproject.org/bibles/audio/33_polish/index.htm
Lyzko 45 | 9,288
27 Jan 2024 #2
As a foreign language teacher, I caution against the down side of bilingual education for adults learning a second language.
While it can be useful while learning to see the trot in one's native language right alongside the language being learned,
in my experience, this can also serve as a crutch which can actually slow down instead of speed up the learning process.
When the mother tongue has been removed and the learner is then forced to communicate in their "new" language, frequently
they can become tongue tied and rely more and more on their first language, gradually losing idiomatic control of the language
they are trying to acquire. The result is that the learner will be looking for someone to constantly feed them the words in
English, or whatever their native language and the new language will never become a reality for them.
johnny reb 47 | 7,057
27 Jan 2024 #3
As a foreign language teacher,

What foreign language do you teach, Lyzko ?
johnny reb 47 | 7,057
27 Jan 2024 #4
Or should I have said, "Which foreign language do you teach, Lyzko ?"
jon357 74 | 21,939
27 Jan 2024 #5
No. "What" is correct here. "Which" would be correct were there a limited range.
Novichok 5 | 7,853
27 Jan 2024 #6
The best and only way to learn the "new" language is by staying away from foreigners.
Step 2: Drop the old one ASAP and especially before your first child is born and never look back.
johnny reb 47 | 7,057
27 Jan 2024 #7
@Lyzko
I didn't hear you, Lyzko.
"Which foreign language do you teach, Lyzko ?"
Joker 2 | 2,599
28 Jan 2024 #8
As a foreign language teacher,

What language do you teach? Can you help me to speak Polski Jedyek?
Alien 18 | 4,845
28 Jan 2024 #9
Which foreign language do you teach, Lyzko ?"

What language do you teach?

Eskimo?
Lyzko 45 | 9,288
28 Jan 2024 #10
I've taught college level German to US students for nearly twenty-five years and find
that source language texts prove more valuable in the long run, often frustrating
as they can be in the beginning for reasons which I stated.
Ironside 53 | 12,493
28 Jan 2024 #11
I've taught college-level German to US students for nearly twenty-five years

Are you the reason that Americans are bad at languages?
Lyzko 45 | 9,288
29 Jan 2024 #12
If Poles all learn English as you do, I shouldn't be at all surprised LOL
Truly knowing a language goes way beyond merely the idiom, the slang, the grammar
or the vocab, Ironside!

The reason your English is workaday fluent, yet will never be native, is precisely because
your language breathes, bleeds your Polish mother tongue.

Such passionately, blithely unbridled arrogance bordering, indeed often exceeding, pure
nastiness in my direction, reveals little of the more space giving Anglo-American, the irony
which allows the other bloke the benefit of the doubt, even if you hate their guts.

Conversely, my Polish will probably always be stymied by the mere fact that I by nature
tend to hold back my unbridled passions and am usually quick to compliment rather than
insult, indeed will apologize instead of keeping up the attacks.

Back to the thread of bilingual education, again, having taught German for umpteen years,
learning to translate only serves to satisfy the momentary need to "understand" a spoken
utterance, yet in the end doesn't allow the student to express themselves independently in
the target language.
Lyzko 45 | 9,288
30 Jan 2024 #13
However, monolingual texts or readings w/accompanying dialogues in the language being acquired must be
supplemented exclusively with visuals in order to make clear what the learner is learning in a language
not their own. The danger is that the learner simply learns to translate into their native tongue instead of
learning the language they wish to know.

Otherwise, it can be an exercise in frustration, that's obvious.
Novichok 5 | 7,853
31 Jan 2024 #14
Are you the reason that Americans are bad at languages?

Americans know the only language worth knowing...

having taught German for umpteen years,

Nobody needs German.
jon357 74 | 21,939
31 Jan 2024 #15
must be
supplemented exclusively with visuals

It really does depend on the learner.

For self study, some people respond well to parallel texts. I don't think anyone would suggest using them exclusively.
mafketis 36 | 10,864
31 Jan 2024 #16
For self study, some people respond well to parallel texts

Cheap hack for very casual study...

Put newspapers in the target language in your twitter feed.

Try to read the tweets that show up and then use the 'translate' option to check yourself.

Quick way to pick up lots of journalism vocabulary (maybe not the most useful on a daily basis but.... also necessary to read media).
jon357 74 | 21,939
31 Jan 2024 #17
That sounds good; thanks for the tip.
Ironside 53 | 12,493
31 Jan 2024 #18
Ironside!

I see you are shaken, not stirred.
Lyzko 45 | 9,288
31 Jan 2024 #19
@Novichok, and everybody needs English??
I see you haven't kept up with the news of late,
but Germany has been the number one migrant
hot spot in Europe for the last ten years and counting!

If Germans all knew, at least spoke, English as though
they were educated native American English speakers,
you might have a small point. However, nothing could be
further from the truth.
Miloslaw 19 | 4,777
31 Jan 2024 #20
Nobody needs German.

True.I studied it for two years, useful but not needed.

and everybody needs English??

I'm afraid that they do, which is why every country in the world is teaching it as a second language.....French was very strong once but English has beaten it to a pulp,

As for German?Who cares?
Novichok 5 | 7,853
31 Jan 2024 #21
An English-speaking person needs another language like Bill Gates needs a financial advisor to tell him how to invest wisely for retirement.
jon357 74 | 21,939
1 Feb 2024 #22
native American

Cherokee?

American English speakers

Why would someone who loved to Europe need or want a form of English from elsewhere?

French

German

It's quite amusing but also depressing sometimes to watch monolinguals on holiday in France or Spain or even visiting Germany.
Novichok 5 | 7,853
1 Feb 2024 #23
monolinguals on holiday in France or Spain or even visiting Germany.

Monos go abroad to see things, not to debate Socrates and Plato. English is more than enough...
jon357 74 | 21,939
1 Feb 2024 #24
And the linguistically challenged miss out on so much.

Only being able to go to bars and restaurants that are tourist traps, getting ripped off in shops and taxis, unable to speak with people they meet.

However we aren't talking about the unfortunate; r are discussing parallel texts as a learning aid.

As I say, they are useful for some learners.
Novichok 5 | 7,853
1 Feb 2024 #25
And the linguistically challenged miss out on so much.

I spent nine months in the Netherlands. What did I miss by not speaking Dutch?
Ironside 53 | 12,493
1 Feb 2024 #26
What did I miss by not speaking Dutch?

You will never know!
Lyzko 45 | 9,288
1 Feb 2024 #27
@Rich, you missed the humor, the complete armchair security in knowing that
your Dutch conversation partner was as sure of his English as a native speaker, as well
as being armed with the knowledge that that partner was naturally, conventionally
expressing, rather than approximating, their feelings only in order to prove a point!!

Doesn't it sort of gall you when people of any age substitute an f-bomb for a perfectly
respectable English vocabulary word, merely in order to sound "cool"?

Bugs the bejesus out of me, that's for dang sure.

As I said at the start of this post, don't you want to know for absolute certain if
somebody from a another country's yankin' yer chains? What better way than by
knowing their language.
Novichok 5 | 7,853
1 Feb 2024 #28
What better way than by knowing their language.

I don't talk to people who don't know my language. Their loss...

Oh,...almost forgot,,, "my language" is American.

I read your first paragraph twice and I still have no idea what you are trying to say - in English...

Next time assume that I am a low-IQ serial murderer and that I will hurt you if you talk to me like this again.
Lyzko 45 | 9,288
1 Feb 2024 #29
Your circle of conversation partners is growing ever smaller, I see.
Obviously, you are lexically or maybe DISlexically challenged, as
the words I used and use in all of my English-language posts are
plain to anyone who graduated from a decent US high school, forget
even about college or university:-)
Miloslaw 19 | 4,777
1 Feb 2024 #30
I don't talk to people who don't know my language.

I think that is a little bit extreme.
English is, without question THE GLOBAL LANGUAGE.
But i speak Polish and French and a smattering of German too.

Polish and German are useless, but with English and French I have been understood everywhere I have travelled.


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