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Russian Greatness - and its Polish Contributors


Bobko 26 | 2,036
9 Jun 2024 #1
Just because I quit the "Polish Aid..." thread, does not mean I am done.

As mentioned, I enjoy being an advocate for my beloved homeland. However, I am not here to autofellate my patriotism. The goal is to talk to Poles.

Poles have made crucial and formative contributions to the development of Russia as a modern state. I wanted to start a thread dedicated to important Poles in Russian history. I already made separate threads in the past about Dzerzhinsky and Rokossovski, but wanted to continue within a new thread going forward.

My list of greatest Poles in Russian history is as follows:

1) Nikolai Przhevalsky - probably one of the greatest Russian geographers and naturalists. He put Central Asia on the map, discovered many species considered lost (including the ancestor of all horses - named after him), and created maps important to Russia's Great Power competition with Britain for control over Afghanistan.

2) Konstantin Tsiolkovsky - as Wikipedia says: "Along with Hermann Oberth and Robert H. Goddard, he is one of the pioneers of space flight and the founding father of modern rocketry and astronautics." This Pole helped Russia beat the West in the Space Race, and is legitimately considered the father of Russian space exploration.

3) Dmitry Shostakovich - one of the greatest and most accomplished composers and pianists of Russia's Soviet period, whose stature grows every year since his death. Perhaps one of the greatest composers of the 20th century.
pawian 224 | 24,500
9 Jun 2024 #2
The goal is to talk to Poles.

Too late. Poles and Polesses here know that you are an incorrigible imperial Russian. :):):)
OP Bobko 26 | 2,036
9 Jun 2024 #3
an incorrigible imperial Russian. :):):)

If you know that I am "Imperial" - then you must understand that I am not a nationalist and not a xenophobe.

A Pole serving Russia, is equal in my eyes to a Russian serving Russia, and above a Russian who is Russian in name only.
Novichok 4 | 7,924
9 Jun 2024 #4
The goal is to talk to Poles.

They don't count unless you enjoy talking to clowns. See Post 2.
The US is the only country that does where Russia is concerned.
Torq 7 | 978
10 Jun 2024 #5
Poles have made crucial and formative contributions to the development of Russia as a modern state.

It worked both ways, of course. Poland remembers Nadzieja O'Brien de Lacy princess Drucka, Aleksander Ford, Paweł Akimow, Konstanty de Lazari, Oleg Zakirow, Natalia Gałczyńska or Igor Newerly, but one doesn't have to go back in time to appreciate the contribution of people with Russian roots into Polish science, culture and politics. Igor Czerniawski, Maria Żuk, Robert Terentiew, Aleksandra Strunin, Maryla Rodowicz, Karol Modzelewski, Piotr Ikonowicz, Julia Hartwig, Magda Gessler, Piotr Gąsowski, to name just a few, all contributed/are contributing to the greatness of modern-day Poland.

But this is not intended to take over your thread, Bobi. I shall read it with much pleasure and interest. :)
Ironside 50 | 12,467
10 Jun 2024 #6
princess Drucka

Who? Druccy had been on the Polish side of history.
OP Bobko 26 | 2,036
10 Jun 2024 #7
Today's Great Russian Pole - Gleb Maksimilianovich Krzhizhanovsky.

Born to an old szlachta family, he was one of Vladimir Lenin's oldest and closest friends.

In the early days, he was the editor of the Rabotnik newspaper, and a cofounder of the League of Struggle for the Emancipation of the Working Class.

Later, when sitting in prison with Lenin, he wrote the Russian words to the Warszawianka.

However important his work was in the early revolutionary circles, Krzhizhanovsky is most remembered for something else. That is, being the head of the GOELRO and the first Chairman of the GOSPLAN.

It's hard to identify two organizations more important to Soviet life in the first decades of its existence. GOELRO, was the state plan for the electrification of Russia. That plan is responsible for the building of the mighty hydroelectric dams in Ukraine, and across Russia proper. The industrialization of the Soviet Union was inextricably linked to the GOELRO plan, administered by this Pole.

The GOSPLAN, is of course the Soviet ministry which managed all of planning in our centrally planned economy.

After his death, Krzhizhanovsky was buried along the Kremlin Wall in the necropolis along with other heroes of Russian history.





Bratwurst Boy 9 | 11,952
10 Jun 2024 #8
Krzh

What is it with these Poles and their hate of vowels..... :)

How do you speak that?
Alien 21 | 5,260
10 Jun 2024 #9
Krzhizhanovsky.

How can the Polish noble surname Krzyżanowski be so mistreated?
OP Bobko 26 | 2,036
10 Jun 2024 #10
How do you speak that?

Well, it's technically only three consonants. The Russian Ж, becomes Zh in Latin transliteration.

It's pronounced Kry-zhy-zhyv-onovski.

How can the Polish noble surname Krzyżanowski be so mistreated?

We literally spelled it exactly as it was written in Polish, but using Russian letters. You should say thank you. In America this would become Krysanovski.
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 11,952
10 Jun 2024 #11
It's pronounced Kry-zhy-zhyv-onovski.

So....like:

Kri-schi-schiv-onovski

?
OP Bobko 26 | 2,036
10 Jun 2024 #12
@Bratwurst Boy

Yes!

5/5
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 11,952
10 Jun 2024 #13
Wow! :)

....again learned something new today....
OP Bobko 26 | 2,036
10 Jun 2024 #14
Wow! :)

Omg, haha. I butchered his last name in transliteration.

It is not "Kri-schi-SCHIV-onowski"

It is "Kri-schi-SCHAN-owski"

I will admit, Poles could have simpler names and it would make life much easier.
Alien 21 | 5,260
10 Jun 2024 #15
In America this would become Krysanovski.

No, in America his name would be Olaf Cross.
gumishu 14 | 6,288
10 Jun 2024 #16
Kri-schi-schiv-onovski

nonsense - and the zh (Polish ż) sound is not present in German (but present in English as in garage)

my guess German transliteration would be Kschischanowski
OP Bobko 26 | 2,036
10 Jun 2024 #17
the zh (Polish ż) sound is not present in German (but present in English as in garage)

I noticed a long time ago that Germans write our Zh sounds as Sch, though.

It makes them sound very funny when they speak Russian. The German accent in Russian is probably one of the most funny ones.

What do you propose they use instead if you say yourself they don't have that sound?
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 11,952
10 Jun 2024 #18
my guess German transliteration would be Kschischanowski

Really?

So....I would probably end up actually saying:

Schischanowski

Unheard "K"....

That I could manage! :)
Torq 7 | 978
10 Jun 2024 #19
Children, children... you think you're ready for the Polish language pronunciation? :)

Krżyżanowski (rus. transl. Кржижано́вский) is correctly pronounced Krʒy-ʒa-nov-ski, where "ʒ" is the consonant sound in English 'measure' or 'pleasure', and "y" has no English equivalent but it's close to the first "y" sound in 'mystify'. The "Krʒy" cluster may be a bit difficult for foreigners but that's the point. :)
mafketis 37 | 10,925
10 Jun 2024 #20
We literally spelled it exactly as it was written in Polish

There's no r sound in Krzy- rz is the old soft r (pь) it's no longer soft and pronounced either zh or sh depending on what consonants are around it... after k it's always sh

syllabified

Krzy - żan -ow - ski

КPЬЫ ( or KPИ but pronounced KШЫ ) ЖAH - OB (pronounced OФ) CKИ
Torq 7 | 978
10 Jun 2024 #21
Krzy - żan -ow - ski

It's not Krzyżanowski, Maf. It's Krżyżanowski.

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleb_Kr%C5%BCy%C5%BCanowski
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 11,952
10 Jun 2024 #22
Krżyżanowski (rus. transl. Кржижано́вский) is correctly pronounced Krʒy-ʒa-nov-ski, where "ʒ" is

*starts crying*
OP Bobko 26 | 2,036
10 Jun 2024 #23
rus. transl. Кржижано́вский

Do you feel the Russian writing and resulting pronunciation is accurate to how Poles would pronounce it?

How do you rate Russian in general at producing Polish sounds?

There's no r sound

Which makes me wonder why we put the R back in there in Russia, when Poles don't use it. Seems wrong. Thanks for this!
Torq 7 | 978
10 Jun 2024 #24
*starts crying*

Typical reaction of a foreigner learning Polish phonological system.

Do you feel the Russian writing and resulting pronunciation is accurate to how Poles would pronounce it?

The Russian transliteration is accurate but you would probably pronounce the ending closer to "iy" than "i". In general Russians make Polish sound much softer than it really is.

There's no r sound

Yes, there is. As I said, it's Krżyżanowski not Krzyżanowski.
OP Bobko 26 | 2,036
10 Jun 2024 #25
Hahahaha!
gumishu 14 | 6,288
10 Jun 2024 #26
There's no r sound in Krzy- rz is

there is in the Russian rendering of the surname (same as in Przewalski surname)
pawian 224 | 24,500
10 Jun 2024 #27
If you know that I am "Imperial" - then you must understand that I am not a nationalist and not a xenophobe.

BS. Imperial Russians are confirmed nationalists coz they believe Ukrainians are Russian and as such, they had to be invaded and conquered by "true" Russians so that Great Russia could be resurrected. . And you also profess such erronoeous credo.,

Of course imperial Russians are xenophobes - they distrust the West and foreigners in general.
Paulina 16 | 4,474
10 Jun 2024 #28
It's Krżyżanowski.

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gleb_Kr%C5%BCy%C5%BCanowski

What the hell... Is that a legit Polish surname? o_O I thought it was an error...

Do you feel the Russian writing and resulting pronunciation is accurate to how Poles would pronounce it?

Yes, besides the ending (in Polish it's "и" instead of "ий" at the end).

This is a bizzare surname though... 🤔 That "Krż" would be difficult to pronounce even for Poles - it's not natural...

*starts crying*

;D

*hugs and hands a tissue* ;D
gumishu 14 | 6,288
10 Jun 2024 #29
Do you feel the Russian writing and resulting pronunciation is accurate to how Poles would pronounce it?

no, it isn't - the Russians heard two "zh's" in Krzyżanowski but saw an 'r' which is not pronounced in Polish because it is part of a digraph 'rz' which sounds exactly as Russian 'zh' (sorry for the lack of cyrillic)

Is that a legit Polish surname?

no - it is what Russians make of the Polish surname Krzyżanowski (simples)
Bratwurst Boy 9 | 11,952
10 Jun 2024 #30
*hugs and hands a tissue* ;D

Thank you.....*sniffles and wipes*


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