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Poles in the Crusades to the Holy Land


Mr Grunwald 29 | 2,014
22 Oct 2010 #61
into vodka and Cristians hid it in huge cellars.

Not a good idea, think of the newspapers of the time if they existed
"HEADLINE: POLISH KNIGHTS SLAUGHTER CHRISTIANS AS THEY LOOK FOR VODKA CELLARS"
Wouldn't be a good idea at all... ;p

Then they would be free to come and go as they pleased.

Ahhh all this talk makes me want to play taleworlds.com.
Mount&Blade :)
Feels like an medieval Lord there hehe
Trevek 26 | 1,702
22 Oct 2010 #62
Polish knights did not need to look to Palestine for that,

True, weren't the pushes east also considered crusades? the Northern crusades were after the main part of the Holy Land crusades (the Teutons had realised it was all going to go belly up and had looked for new pastures)
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
22 Oct 2010 #63
in essence said Spiritual works can be seen as equivalent to modern day health insurance given the lack of effective care at the time.

That is a very interesting way to look at it.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
22 Oct 2010 #64
The failure of the crusades in Palestine did in fact lead to the redirection of Christian military zeal against the heathens in the Baltic lands, which in turn led to the militarization of Lithuania and its subsequent expansion all the way to the Black Sea. When the Lithuanians did finally convert late in the 14th century they did so in a political union with Poland rather than in submission to the hated Knights of the Cross. Thus the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth is arguably a far flung result of the crusades, and perhaps the Commonwealth's relative religious tolerance was reaction to the fanaticism of the crusader enemy.
southern 75 | 7,096
23 Oct 2010 #65
The failure of the crusades in Palestine did in fact lead to the redirection of Christian military zeal against the

Against Byzantium.There was the money as crusaders found out.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
23 Oct 2010 #66
the heathens in the Baltic lands

and the Cathars in France (not as far to travel and most English knights already spoke French)
POLENGGGs 2 | 150
26 Nov 2010 #67
This describes why a Polish is usually an aggressive, untrustworthy, crook - they have some outlaw genes in them from these 'Jesus Knight's'
Mr Grunwald 29 | 2,014
26 Nov 2010 #68
Thus the Polish Lithuanian Commonwealth is arguably a far flung result of the crusades, and perhaps the Commonwealth's relative religious tolerance was reaction to the fanaticism of the crusader enemy.

The concept of tolerance was enacted because of all the hostilities towards Protestants in France. As many Polish noblemen were protestants at that time they feared that the sociaty will go after them. Later on most of them converted to Catholiscism or their sons/daugthers thanks to Jesuits which were teaching in Universities.
Olaf 6 | 956
26 Nov 2010 #69
Now Poland takes part in other crusades, in Iraq and Afghanistan, for different reasons.
de_roffe - | 1
22 Nov 2014 #70
Many interesting comments. It's disturbing that some are so unstudied in this matter. "Official" histories often omit these facts. I have lost the files I had in Russian language about a group of a few dozen Polish (Ukrainian also if you count Galicia) knights who joined on the first crusade. It was not hearsay, it referred to old Russian-language documents. My ancestor William de Roffe MAY have been the de Rossal, the ninth knight, and MAY have quarreled with Godfrey de Bouillon, on the first crusade. All I know is that within a century, his clan leadership of Ross in Scotland had been destroyed, and his lodge razed (now it is Boleskin House on the shores of Loch Ness), and Godfrey de Roffe was beheaded in 1212 after a long fast in prison after he tried to lead the Ross and Moray rebellions against the Stewarts. William Ross/Roffe/Ros then moved to Lublin Poland and started the Scots Brotherhood of Lublin. MAYBE it was because of the First Crusades experience of his grandfather? All of this can be verified in old books, but I do not still have all of them. I can find everything about all of this on the internet EXCEPT the list of Polish/Galician knights. Maybe Putin's goons stopped the Russian-language website that my friends in Ukraine told me about? Randall Roffe
Korwin - | 17
15 Dec 2014 #71
When Leszko Biały was asked by the bishop why he did not want to go to the Holy Land to join the crusades, he replied it was because he heard that they do not serve beer there and that the people there have no knowledge of the beverage.

Bolesław the Tall had gone to the Holy Land with the Holy Roman Emperor Konrad III and later to Italy with Frederick Barbarossa. In Italy he was distinguished for his valor at the siege of Mediolan where he defeated an Italian Knight in single combat.
amusielewicz
19 Dec 2020 #72
I had a distant direct ancestor Leon de Kedros (Kiedrowski) (1170 to 2012) that was knighted at the siege of Acre during the 3rd Crusade to the Levant. A noble was resting under a cedar tree or kedros, and a lion was stalking him. When the lion charged, Leon grabbed a nearby lance and killed the lion. He was knighted for this and also gained 10,000 acres including Kiedrowice back in Pomerania from King Sambor.

There were Poles on the 3rd Crusade, but they were probably Germanic knights as the family provided many knights for the Teutonic Order, including some knights that were commanders of garrisons. I believe that only Germans could be members of the Teutonic knights, but I will look into that.
Crow 146 | 9,097
19 Dec 2020 #73
Its all very sad to me. Why did our people had to bleed for foreigners who deeply hated them.
pawian 176 | 14,299
21 Dec 2020 #74
The historical anecdote says that when in 13thy century Pope Innocent III requested Polish King, Leszek Biały, to take part in a crusade, he answered that "neither he nor any self-respecting Polish knight could be induced to go to the Holy Land, where, they had been informed, there was no wine, mead, or even beer to be had".

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leszek_the_White
Crow 146 | 9,097
22 Dec 2020 #75
Polish King, Leszek Biały, ....., there was no wine, mead, or even beer to be had".

Oh, blessed be wise Polish Pan Kralj.


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