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Does anyone have any relatives who served with 1st Polish Armoured Division (Gen. Maczek)


OP Peter 3 | 247
5 Jul 2011 #151
See a previous posters reply below. This is probably your best bet for accurate info and a starting point for further searching

The MoD will only release service records to a next of kin. So you will need a) proof of grandfather's death (death certificate) and b) that you are his direct next of kin.

The MoD will send you a "Certificate of Kinship" form which you have to complete and send along with the documentary proof you are your grandfather's next of kin. If your grandmother is alive for instance, the law is that MoD would only release this information to her and not you. There is a fee of £25.00 also.

You can download the "Certificate of Kinship form from here:
veterans-uk.info/pdfs/service_records/raf_kinship.pdf

Contact address for Polish service records (don't worry that it has RAF in the address; all Polish service records are archived here) at MoD:

APC Polish Enquiries,
Building 28B,
RAF Northolt,
West End Road,
Ruislip,
HA4 6NG,
Tel: 0208 833 8603
Fax: 0208 833 8866

e-mail: polishastdisoff@northolt.raf.mod.uk or polishdisoff@northolt.raf.mod.uk
a_jacobs49 1 | 11
30 Jul 2011 #152
My Uncle Zygfryd also died in France in August 1944 I found his information and a photo of him with his grave cross, look on The Fallen Soldiers in France web site most helpful site My Uncle was only 22 when he died in the battle of Falaise 1st Armoured Division, 8 Rifle Batalion
kr.las
31 Jul 2011 #153
In Breda,in the Netherlands, is the " General Maczekmuseum",
have a look at their website.
ziarko 1 | 3
8 Oct 2011 #154
Hello ...My name is William Ziarnko..the N was added ..I am a Ziarko..I did see the name Stanislaw Ziarko who was killed in Normandy during World War Two..he served with the 1st Armoured Division 14/08/44...I do not know if he is a relative of mine at this present time but I shall soon e-mail for more information..I will post again about this when I receive the answer...I and my sister have been searching for relatives in Poland for a very long time..the Ziarko's we are probably related to are from the Opatow area in Poland...my grandfather had five brothers and three sisters..one of those brothers was a Stanislaw Ziarko..born in 1893...it could be that him or possibly one of his children...if he had any...is that person...

hope this helps us both...I am sending a letter to fallen soldiers of Poland next
GILLES - | 6
8 Oct 2011 #155
Hello, the great father of my wife was also in the traffic control squ, and i have pictures in Breda!
Please contact me.

Thanks
Gilles

Hello,
if any one wish to know more about Gen.Maczek division and the city of Maczkow, polish city in germany fater war, please contact me at gilles.lapers@skynet.be

regards
Gilles-Brussels-Belgium
cmpuzko
29 Oct 2011 #156
My uncle Piotr Perchacz was in the Polish armed forces from a Soviet pow camp to VE day.He served in 1 Pulk Art.Mot.I have his photos & medals.
beatar33
30 Oct 2011 #157
Hello All, My Grandfather Eugeniusz was the personal driver of General Maczek. Do you have by any chance some info/pics related to my Grandfather? I would appreciate any feedback you may have.
Bohdanowicz - | 1
8 Nov 2011 #158
My father was Konrad Bohdanowicz a tank commander with the first Polish Armored Division. He fought with France until it fell, made his way to England and fought with England. After the war he and many others in his regiment emigrated to Canada, living in Toronto. He passed away in 2002.
Eddiet
25 Dec 2011 #159
My father Hieronim Sobiech who served as a sergeant in the 1st Polish Armoured Division, specifically the 10th Light Field Ambulance Unit, he was awarded the British Empire Medal for work in repairing ambulances under enemy fire in the Quilly area.

Should anyone have a relative who received an award it is very easy to obtain the details by looking in the UK national archives.
A list of all those of the 1st Polish Armoured Division who received awards is given in the back pages of a relevantly recently published (2005) book by Evan McGilvray called The Black Devil's March

ISBN 978-1-906033-53-8
the name Black Devils refers to a nickname given to the Poles because of the colour of their berets.
Eddie Sobiech
sylwekcan
28 Dec 2011 #160
My father served there. His name is Mieczysław Terlecki
Goszcz 3 | 3
4 Feb 2012 #161
Hello Hitman - I was so excited to see my father's name, Kazimierz Goszcz, on the list you posted from the journal kept by a member of the 1st Polish Armoured Division. Sadly, my father died in 1999. He was always proud of his military service and often marched in Veterans Day parades. I have an old photo of my father with some of his fellow soldiers on a tank that I will upload soon. What other information do you have in the journal? I would very much appreciate your sharing any additional documents or photos that you have. I am trying to find more information about my father's time in the military. I look forward to hearing from you and to visiting this forum often.
GPater
15 Feb 2012 #162
Do you have an email address for Evan McGilvray?
carrieedmonds
28 Feb 2012 #163
Can anyone help me, I'm trying to get any info I can on a soldier who possibly served in the 24th Lancers - all I have is surname WOJNA.

All I know is that he would have been based in or around Lauder, Scotland in 1942/1943.
OP Peter 3 | 247
5 Mar 2012 #164
Having a first name would help. If you are in the UK you may try the Sikorski Institute. If you are a blood relative and can show this, then you can write to the MoD Polish Section.
Stretcham
5 Mar 2012 #165
Hi Celia, could you contact me please, I'm fairly sure I own your father's old lancia fulvia. You can reach me on 07518 623525, or email nick_wells@hotmail

Many thanks,

Nick
Stretcham - | 1
6 Mar 2012 #166
Hi Peter,

This is a bit of a long shot but I own a rare car which was bought by Wladislaw Bledowski, the father of Celina Bledowski, after he returned to Scotland. He bought he car in the 1960s, had it fitted with hand controls as he lost his legs in combat in Holland. I'm trying to contact Celina and my searches led me here. Would you at all be in contact with Celina and if so would you pass my details on? My email is nick_wells@hotmail, and my tel no is 07518 623525. Regards, Nick
OP Peter 3 | 247
6 Mar 2012 #167
Carrie,

I found a bombardier who was with the 1st Polish Armoured division named Zdzislaw Wojnar and was decorated with the Krzyz Waleczynch. Not sure if this is the person you are looking for.

You may also try contacting Robert Ostrycharz who may be able to point you in the right direction.

ostrycharz.free-online.co.uk/index.htm
carrieedmonds
10 Mar 2012 #168
Wow, thanks for that Peter. Can I ask where you found Zdzislaw Wojnar? I'm new to all this and not sure where to get info from. All I have is the surname WOJNAR and fact that he was based around Lauder, Scotland in 1942/43. Oh and I also believe he may have served with or been friends with a Piotr WILCZEK who was also in Lauder around that time and married a local woman named Agnes Aitchison!!

I'll email Robert Ostrycharz as you suggested. Thanks again.

Hi Peter - I've now discovered that I believe his first name was Josef or Joseph?! So its Joseph WOJNAR in or around Lauder in 1942/43!!
andrew jab - | 33
10 Mar 2012 #169
stories of his families escape from Poland and how they finally got to England

Yep,my grandad fought defending warsaw in 39 and escaped back home to slonim(now Belarus) before being deported to siberia and then escaping and joining with Gen Anders fighting at monte cassino.

One of many thousands who came to England and was then treated as an 'alien' by a huge slice of the indigenous population,that was the gratitude afforded to many many polish veterans who fought for everyones freedom.

My grandad kept his dignity,if it were me id have spat something along the lines of,what,did our soldiers die gallantly all over Europe to be treated as outcasts and second class citizens after being distgustingly sold down the river at yalta?

Churchill/Roosevelt = no HONOR!!
OP Peter 3 | 247
10 Mar 2012 #170
Hi Carrie,

I found Wojnar in the list of medal recipients in "McGilvray, Evan. The Black Devils' March: A Doomed Odyssey: The 1st Polish Armoured Division 1939-1945. Solihull, West Midlands, England: Helion, 2005"

If he was in Lauder in 42/43 he may have been with a different unit such as the 10th Mounted Rifles.

Also, if you have some documented info about Agnes Aitchison then you can try searching on ancestry.com, you should be able to get some info on her there and by extension, Joseph.

London Gazette, 23 August 1949

NATURALISATION.
LIST of ALIENS to whom Certificates of Naturalisation have been granted by the Secretary of State, and whose Oaths of Allegiance have been registered in the Home Office during the month of July 1949. The date shown in each case is the date on which the Oath of Allegiance was taken.

Wojna, Jan; Poland; Electrical Engineer; 16, Bay View Road, Colwyn Bay, Denbighshire. 21 June, 1949.
Wojna, Jozef; Poland ; Cafe Manager ; " The Lighthouse," River Front, Gunthorpe, Nottinghamshire. 20 July, 1949

From ancestry.com it appears that Jozef died in 1988 in Nottinghamshire.
fadows
18 Mar 2012 #171
Hi there, just came accross this forum and was interested that Henrik Sadowski served in the 1st Polish Armoured Division as so did my father after he arrived in Scotland from the Siberian prison camps.His name is Feliks Sadowski and i know i still have relatives in Lodz. Who knows maybe there is a connection although my father served in the transport division.
chauffeur5
3 Apr 2012 #172
Yes my Dad was a Tank Commander, and lost my Uncle outside Lommal my Father buried him as my Father lived in A village called Suchednow every man in the village joined the Black Devils

Father Zygmunt Kania
GILLES - | 6
3 Apr 2012 #173
16th august was the battle of Falaise and Maczuga in France 1944

Gilles
GeOrGe314343
12 May 2012 #174
My father, Vincent Slowinski (Słowiński) served as a mechanic in this Division. He was one of the youngest, being born in 1924,but died 4 years ago. He was captured in France in 1940 but escaped internment, after which he crossed the Pyrenee mountains into Spain where he was, again, incarcerated. Eventually he was taken to Great Britain where he received his mechanic training (in Scoland). Later he took part in the liberation of Holland. In 1948 he left with his Scottish wife and two children for Canada, arriving at Pier 28 in Halifax.

His involvement as a soldier arose when he was chased by the Russians but made his way to Yugoslavia and, eventually, to France.

George Slowinski
natalie80 - | 1
5 Aug 2012 #175
Hi everyone. I am looking for any information/relatives....anything about my maternal grandfather.

His birth name was Boleslaw Olszak (his name is Bill in polish) Born July 14, 1917 in Osada Nowy Michalin nad Bogiem, Poland. He had 3 boy’s named Marian,Henryk and Jan who all died from starvation on their way to Siberia. He joined the Polish army, First Armored Division under the command of General Maczek and had an honorable discharge on Feb. 13, 1948 then immigrated to England.

It might sound like I already know alot about him but I never had a chance to meet him. He died in 1995 here in Canada.

I would love any information of his parents, siblings, cousins and anyone he served in the war with. I have no photos.

I thank you kindly in advance.

Natalie
tedleja - | 1
6 Aug 2012 #176
Looking for Where members of 1st Polish Armored Division were born:

My father is a goral who was born in Koniowka near Zacopane in 1921. Because he immigrated to Canada in 1935, he chose to fight for his adopted country and ended up in Normandy in June 1944. He was part of the 3rd Canadian Division and part of the 8th RECEE regiment of the Canadian army based in Montreal. As you know the 1st Polish Armored was attached to the Canadian army and the Polish armored brigade were responsible for closing the Falaise gap at all costs. My father's job in reconnaisance was to probe behind enemy lines looking for weakness to exploit. He had been reported missing in action many times and subject to friendly fire many times. From regimental records from our archives in Ottawa, I believe that he was within 15 kilometres or less of that amazing battle on the far side of the Canadian troops trying to relieve the Poles. His job was to find the Wehrmacht that was trying to help their trapped brothers.

I'm sure that my father knew that his fellow Poles were nearby. I'm just curious and would like to find anyone in the Polish division who lived in the same town or in the same area. who knows that maybe the neighbour across the street. I'm trying to visit Poland and Konoiwka in October.

Ted
Kon
16 Sep 2012 #177
He possibly went through the same experience as my father. Escape South and interment, until the Polish Governement in exile organised the neccessary bribes and escape plans. Then by ship to Toulon and begrudging incorporation into the French Army, as the Black C=k=Cat Brigade.

The French did not consider that defeated armoured troops were an enhancement to their order of battle. They remained in poor accommodation under-equiped and un-wanted near Reims, that is until the Germans came over the border and then they became essential fighting troops. After a successful initial battle engagement they found themselves isolated and made their way to Dunkirk.

Be aware that individual Polish Army service records are available on proof of your identity anf the death of your relative. Payment of approx £40 from the MOD at Raf Uxbridge. Worth a try.
cdogr90043
2 Nov 2012 #178
My father who is still alive (in his nineties), and doing fine.......... lives in Scotland (October 2012)........He was as an Officer in the 10th Mounted Rifles, 1st Armoured Division, under General Macznek.......... His name is Stanislaw Wladyslaw Bednarski...........My father fought in France, as well as in the Normandy landings, etc. He is still alive, and doing very well! Tough old Pole! On the 10th Mounted Rifles regimental 'roll of honour', he is listed as receiving the 'Cross of Valour'. I have a box of his old 'tank (Cromwell)' photographs, pictures of his regiment in Scotland, some documents, his papers relating to many medals, etc. Parts of uniform, buttons, braid, rank tabs, etc. His medals, and ribbons are all present (I didn't know what they were, but the Sirkoski Institute in London identified and verified them all). The British records offices have forwarded his Military records to me some years ago. My father was shot through the jaw by a sniper after the battle at Fallais, where I believe they fought to keep some hill, running short on fuel (as the Germans retreated)? He had some amazing stories of the Regiments advance, and an almost comical one of how he (with his driver) tried to get back to the Medical Unit after his being badly shot, in a jeep through the Canadian 'back markers', where they stopped his jeep and stated 'can you not read English'. I think he drew a pistol on the Canadian MP, and that allowed him through!!! He rejoined his regiment in Europe eventually, after medical treatment at Liverpool (I think)? After the war ended he dealt with 'prisoner' repatriation in Europe for some years. His Regiment used to write to him sometimes, but not for some time now? He got a letter some years ago from Lech Wvlanska (sorry spelling wrong, but he was President for a time) promoting him after many years to 'Captain' (he was in his late seventies by then)!!!..........Should anyone know why he was awarded the 'Cross of Valour', or remember him kindly let me know. My father is an honourable, and upstanding man (always has been), he seldom if ever talks of his war years now. Regards Michal Bednarski.

Further to the above post.........I can recall my father Stanislaw W. Bednarski (10th Mounted Rifles, 1st Armoured Division) having to report monthly to the local Police Office as an 'Alien' with his card after 1949. This was in the small vilage in Scotland where he lived...........and the policeman was his friend! This went on for years, and years, till the late sixties or early seventies I think?.........He never took British citizenship, and is still Polish. He has never returned to Poland. Isn't life strange how it turns out................On a different 'subject', he stated that whenever a 'soldier' was killed in battle, he was 'registered' at the next highest rank for military records? I don;t know if this only applied to Cadet Officers, or all ranks of the 10th Mounted Rifles? I seem to recall him saying the 'funds' were not always avalable for 'normal' promotion in the UK, during training for the Normandy landings? M. Bednarski.
LEICA 4 | 18
2 Nov 2012 #179
Hi everyone,

My father was based in Scotland during ww2 would he have been under General Maczek.

Thanks for any information in advance
Harry
2 Nov 2012 #180
^ Hi. I've got an address to write to, let me search on my laptop when I'm back from the pub.


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