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THE MEANING AND RESEARCH OF MY POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?


SheWolf81 - | 1
13 Apr 2015 #3,781
Hi, I would love to learn more about my grandfathers heritage. I am in Toronto btw. His last name was Chmurowicz, born in Kolyma Galicia. sadly he was left at boarding school when his father's new wife rejected him. He had a brother named Karol I believe (my last name now is Carroll, his British wife suggested since it was very hard to get a job if they can't say your name, he couldn't repatriate) and also a sister. Said his mother was Hungarian and my aunt is quite olive. He wouldn't talk much, I wish I knew him better. If anyone knows about any of the boarding schools back in the 1920's or of the last name or would mean the world to me. Thanks
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
14 Apr 2015 #3,782
CHMUROWSKI: root-word chmura (cloud), possibly a patronymic nickname for someone whose father was called Chmura; or a toponymic tag for an inhabitant of the Masurian settlement of Chmury.
Czarnecki24 1 | 3
18 Apr 2015 #3,783
Anyone have an idea what my last name means and/or comes from? Czarnecki :)
My grandparents came from Poland and now reside in Alberta
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
18 Apr 2015 #3,785
CZARNECKI: Root-word czarny (black); of toponymic origin tracing back to numerous localities called Czarna or Czarne. One of many surnames derived from czarn- or czern- including Czarniecki, Czarnowski, Czarnik, Czarnota, Czerniak, Czerniawski and many more. In English too there are such surnames as Black, Blackly, Blackton, Blacking, Blackman, Blackwood, Blackfield, etc.
archiwum 13 | 125
19 Apr 2015 #3,786
My great uncle Bruce M. is my grampa Daves half bother. Bernice is my aunt also.
Gosc123456
20 Apr 2015 #3,787
"Causin" looks like a French name and could well be French. There were French soldiers from Napoleon's army who stayed in Poland after marrying Polish women and the result now is that quite a few Poles have French names, pronounced the Polish way and sometimes (but not always) with spelling a bit modified.
TheOther 6 | 3,818
20 Apr 2015 #3,788
There were French soldiers from Napoleon's army who stayed in Poland

Could as well be descendants of Huguenots who settled in Brandenburg, Prussia, from 1685 on.
missb
21 Apr 2015 #3,789
@ao88

The surname Bumber is originally Croatian (Sibenik), and there are not many of us left.

Now you know :-)
Gosc123456
21 Apr 2015 #3,790
@TheOther: if IN POLAND unlikely there were Hughenots ;). Protestants who fled catholic (at the time) France as they were even murdered would not have moved to another catholic country ;) so very hard to believe they came to Poland.... Hughenots obviously moved to protestant countries (England, Germany, Holland, and also often to South Africa where they started the wine production).
TheOther 6 | 3,818
21 Apr 2015 #3,791
You forgot that Poland was partitioned for a long time. Huguenots migrated from Brandenburg to West Prussia for example. I have one of them in my family tree.
radom
22 Apr 2015 #3,792
Does anyone have any information on or know anything about my surname, Gniadkowski? My grandad was Polish and came from Radom.

I researched online and I think the root "Gniad" means sorrel or bay (meaning the plant) but I'm not sure.

Dziękuję.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
22 Apr 2015 #3,793
GNIADKOWSKI: root-word = adjective gniady (sorrel-coloured or reddish-bown - usually said of a horse's coat). For some strange reason Enlgish also uses the word sorrel to mean a green leafy veggie like spinach which in Polish is claled szczaw. Anyway, nearly all -owski ending surnames are of toponymic origin. This one originated to identify a native of places called Gniadków or Gniadkowo (Sorrelton, Sorrelville in rough translation). One gentry line using an own-name coat of arms.
archiwum 13 | 125
25 Apr 2015 #3,794
Bernice G.-Grama Davis was maybe buried in Calvary Cemetery or Old South Burrying Ground cemetery in Middlesex County, MA.

Also maybe East Parish Burying Ground cemetery.

Bernice G. could be Whillis?

Bernice was my 2nd great grandmother.

MAE Hefty was my great grandfather's first wife. Richard was there son.

Richard was a half brother to my grampa Dave.

Great Grama Cook: Was Anna Elizabeth Storkaarsen-Religion-Calvary Temple Assembly Of God-Pastor-Rev. Watson Argue.

Charles Lewis Cook-Kath

2nd Grrat Grandparents

Correction: Great Grandparents

My grampa Dave and his sister grew up in Parkland, Lakewood, WA.USA.

Dave and his sister were born in Tacoma, WA.USA.

Correction: My great grandmother Ora died in 1983.Seattle Times.

Charles Lewis Cook-The last name Cook was Koch before he changed it to Cook in San Francisco.

(Lilo)Liselotte my grandmother was born 1932. Here mother Dorothea married my great grandfather in 1929.

Dorothea immigrated through Norway in 1930. Ancestry.com has 1935, but this is incorrect.

Lilo's grandfather: Martin Karl Heinrich Radmann had a brother: Heinrich Wilhelm Edguard Radmann.

Edguard's notable son/daughter: Horst Radmann/Hildegard Radmann.

Bernice was German and Irish.

Correction: Grama Davis was German and Irish.

Some Review: In my family there is 2 Robert's. A uncle and a nephew. Robert G. is the uncle and Robert W is the nephew.

G. stands for Glenn. Not George!

R.W. Cook

My uncle said: don't listen to those people, they just want to make a fool out of you on bets. If you inherit anything

it would be a couple of thousand of dollars. Most of it is going to your other uncles. (My other uncles would be my father's brothers).

They make bets on how you react to things! (Mother's Brother).

My Opinion: They are probaley trying to get me charged with something so they can get something ordered later.Assault Charge.

Get me mad!

It's harrassment.

MC's grandmother was Rhoda. Rhoda's father was William. I'm guessing William was American Indian, and Bicknell was colonial?

William was my 5th great grandfather.

Rhoda is buried I think in Last Chance cemetery, Iowa.

Findagrave.com is were you can see what it is.

Donna M. is my 3rd cousin. Here grandfather was Alma's brother. Sorry. Alma was my great grandmother.

Some people think I was born in 1982. Nope. I was born in 1971-R.W. Cook

My parents got married in 1970. It was a civil marriage-judge.

My father was 20 and my mother was 18.

Again I was born in 1971 and not 1982.
..............
Vicky is grama Davis's niese.
momdrex1
29 Apr 2015 #3,795
Lukaszewicz This was the name my mother said was the original, she thinks! was shortened to Luka at German Port, before coming to US
No one else left to verify, she does believe they were from Poland.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
29 Apr 2015 #3,796
£UKASZEWICZ: surname of patronymic origin derived from first name £ukasz (one of the Four Evangelists) meaning "son of Luke"; English equivalent Lucasson. Very popular Polish surname; alternate form: £ukasiewicz;

10 different noble lines amongst the surname's bearers with as many coats of arms.

For more information please contact me.
Da Bears 1 | 2
3 May 2015 #3,797
My grandfather came from alexandrow Poland and I am trying to find out the meaning of his mothers surname.Gnatski,Gnatska.Thanks for any info!
Robert0785
3 May 2015 #3,798
Tobicash! I cannot find any information for my last name. Someone help!

Also. Gawlik. So the meaning or information for Tobicash and Gawlik. I'm completely lost in all of this and am dying for some information.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
3 May 2015 #3,799
GNACKI: Gnatski is not a Polish spelling but it makes sense in America. If it had been left intact, its bearer would have had to go through life being called something like "nacky". Polish pronunciation is GNAHT-ski (the "g" is tounded).

It originated as a patronymic tag derived from the first name Ignacy (Ignatius), Gnacek or Gnacik for short, and means the same as "Iggy's boy".

For more information please contact me.

TOBIKASZ: root-word Tobiasz (Tobias) from which the pet form is Tobik. Tobik's son would have been called Tobikasz or Tobikiewicz.

GAWLIK: pet form of first name Gaweł (Gaul), probably also a patronymic for "the son of Gaweł".

For more information please contact me.
Da Bears 1 | 2
11 May 2015 #3,800
How does one start to find baptismal records in Poland.I tried the LDS sight but they don't carry Alexandrow Poland.What geneologist services are there.Thanks for any info!
TheOther 6 | 3,818
11 May 2015 #3,801
I tried the LDS sight but they don't carry Alexandrow Poland

Try one of these: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr%C3%B3w
Pusiek
19 May 2015 #3,802
Could you please tell me where my late father's surname: Domżał may have come from? He was born in central Poland (Mazowsze), but I heard that the Domzal clans originally came from Slovakia or Slovenia (where there's a town called Domzale), some settling in the south of Poland and some nearer Warsaw.

Also, could you please tell me about the origins of my late mother's maiden name: Naplocha? I've heard that my grandfather was descended from Hungarian nobility, but cannot find any such Hungarian surname to date, unless it was polonised from Zaploya or Nopcsa? My Uncle believed it was from Napoleon (1812 > Russia via Poland), but a friend has suggested it's from the Russian 'nye plochy' for brave/not timid?
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
19 May 2015 #3,803
Any of your hypothesis are possible, because onomastics (name research) can be a tricky business. My own hunch goes as follows:

DOMŻALSKI: A toponymic tag from the Slovenian locality of Domžale; or alternatively from the Old Polish verb domrzeć (to die, finally expire); the deceased might have been called Domrzał (he has died, or he has finally breathed his last {after prolonged agony?}); but amid widespread illiteracy it became Domżał or Domżal, and his son (possibly born posthumously) became Domżalski).

NAP£OCHA: probably from the Old Polish verb płochać (to frighten, spook prey -- in modern Polish płoszyć); napłoszyć would mean to scare up lots of game; so maybe it originated to identity an especially skillful beater who scared up plenty of prey for a hunting party.
zbavko
21 May 2015 #3,804
Hi, I'm wondering if anyone can help me with the surnames: Dubas and Barylak.

Both grandparents who had these surnames were from Kresy. Are they of Polish or Ruthenian/Ukrainian origin?
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
21 May 2015 #3,805
DUBAS: The dub root is the Ruthenian equivalent of Polish dąb (oak). In Old Polish a dubas was a kind of small boat or barge.

BARYLAK: from the word baryła (barrel). A cooper coiuld have been nicknamed Baryła and when he fathered a son, the offspring would have been called Barylak. But baryła is also used to mean a heavy-set, rotund individual so Barylak could also mean "fatty's son".

NOTE: Names regardless of origin do not necessarily define the ethnicity of their bearers. There are Poles named Szulc and Sawczuk and Germans and Ukrainians called Kowalski.
Jojomi
21 May 2015 #3,806
Hello,

Can you tell me what's the origin of Wardzala surname? I've searched before but never found any info

Thanks a lot for your help,

Jojo
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
21 May 2015 #3,807
WARDZA£A: several possible sources 1) warda - southpaw, left-handed person; 2) wardać się: to wander aimlessly, loiter; 3) wardęga - tramp, wanderer.

For more info please contact me.
KonczykR
26 May 2015 #3,808
Merged: Konczyk surname meaning

I'm doing research for a project on my family's genealogy and would appreciate any help or advice to help get me started.

Looking at public records I have found multiple people with my same exact last name and others with similar spelling or pronunciation, I'm not sure how much of this is human error or just coincidence.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
26 May 2015 #3,809
KOŃCZYK: Probably originated as a hypocoristic (pet) form of the Germanic-derived first name Konrad. It could have also functioned as a patronymic nickname (son of Konrad). Other sources of origin are also possible. For more information please contact me.
CiggytheKid
30 May 2015 #3,810
Merged: Cyganowski name genealogy

Hello! I'm from America currently backpacking Europe, staying in Krakow right now.

My father's grandparents, who I never got to meet, were from Poland. My dad not having much relationship with his father or them knows little of our history. So I was hoping someone could help me out.

My last name is Cyganowski. I was informed Cygan means gypsy, ski being a common suffix and ow just being connecting letters. Does anyone know anything about my name? We are fair skinned with blue eyes and brown hair, so not resembling Romani at all.

If anyone knows anything I'd love to learn!

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