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How does a person join the Poland's army?


jglow 1 | 1
28 Mar 2014 #1
Hello,

Currently I'm living in the U.S. and going through the process of claiming my Polish citizenship. I'm conversational in Polish. I'm currently learning and studying Polish everyday. Next year I'm supposed to go to Kraków to go to school and study for the year, obviously so I can really learn Polish and get a good grip on it. I've already talked to a few soldiers from Poland who helped me out a bit with language concerns. However, I still have a few questions for anybody here who can answer.

1.) How do you actually join the army in Poland?
2.) How does job selection work? Do they pick the best guys for certain jobs or do guys get to pick their job like in America?

3.) What are the years of service?
4.) I understand that to many if not all the guys I will be considered an American and a foreigner even as a Polish citizen. However, not that I really care, would be hated by a lot of the guys? Kind of in a "who does he think he is coming here" kind of way.

I have personal reasons for wanting to fight for Poland instead of America. I don't want to hear about politics or how hard it will be. I would just like to have the questions answered please. I don't want to sound like an a*s but way to many times on other forums people have just given me lectures, insulted me, or just ignored the questions.

Thank you very much to anybody who can answer this.
Kowalski 7 | 621
28 Mar 2014 #2
I'm not sure how it is this year but few years back Polish Army would take 2000 soldiers onto some contracts and there were 20000 willing to join in. So, over all it is not easy to get into the army. The usual process is as follows: at certain age you are called to do your 9 months regular service for the army - you may take it or refuse. After 9 months you'd have a chance to apply for professional contract. As you said you'd be having polish nationality and would be going to school in Poland. This would be a good time and place to visit any army office (WKU) and probably volunteer with regular service.
OP jglow 1 | 1
28 Mar 2014 #3
I plan on doing that as soon as I get there. I'll be 23 when I get there if my age matters. I heard the max age is 28. Either way, thank you for the reply.
Piotrek1990 - | 3
12 Mar 2015 #4
Merged: How to become a professional soldier of Poland's Army?

Hey guys I recently applied for the Australian army however due to my colour-blindness I was unable to get the position I applied for(Poland has lower colour-blindness .... or so iv heard) . I am 24 years old born in Australia and about to graduate from university, both of my parents where born in Poland and I plan to get my Polish citizenship. My Polish is rather basic I can communicate fairly well in speech but reading and writing is a little difficult for me. If I get my Polish citizenship and touch up on my Polish would this be possible?

also some help in how to get my Polish citizenship, I recently contacted the Polish embassy in Australia but have not received a reply yet.

Do I just need to prove that my parents where born in Poland? thx
goofy_the_dog
12 Mar 2015 #5
after passing the etsts etc, you can send the papers to tiyr nearest WKU,kas a post-grad you could apply to the Wroclawska szloka oficerska, (Wroclaw's Officers school) but bear in mind that the Poland's army has a bit too many officers and generals atm ;) much easier to become a private, thats what the army needs. ;)
Piotrek1990 - | 3
12 Mar 2015 #6
thx for the reply...
I am about to receive a degree in logistics and supply chain management, I could possibly go into the aus army as a logistics officer, but I am really keen on going in as a rifleman and that's not going to happen in aus. Hopefully I will have more luck in Poland if not then the French foreign legion is my last chance, it would be much easier for me to become fluent/literate in Polish however.

Does anybody know the minimum service time required for enlisted men in Poland? I have no desire to become an officer
Looker - | 1,033
12 Mar 2015 #7
As someone already mentioned earlier in this thread, the duration of compulsory military service in Poland is nine months.
Piotrek1990 - | 3
12 Mar 2015 #8
I am referring to the professional contract, 9 months seems way too short
jon357 63 | 14,714
12 Mar 2015 #9
That was for conscripts - most people on a professional contract started that way.
Harry
12 Mar 2015 #10
Do I just need to prove that my parents where born in Poland?

Being born in Poland doesn't give a person Polish citizenship; neither does having parents who were born in Poland.
First one of your parents would need to have their Polish citizenship confirmed (assuming they still qualify) and then you could have your Polish citizenship confirmed.

My Polish is rather basic I can communicate fairly well in speech but reading and writing is a little difficult for me.

You'll need to be pretty much completely fluent in order to pass the entry tests.

the French foreign legion is my last chance

The Legion sounds like a much better plan: no need to spend the time needed to sort out your Polish citizenship and no need to spend the time needed to get your Polish fluent.

Personally I'd be very much thinking logistic officer and then look to transfer/retrain when a proven quality.
Wulkan - | 3,251
17 Nov 2015 #11
moved
Doesn't Polish army get paid for fighting for Poland or they do it for free?
Harry
17 Nov 2015 #12
That's the difference between patriots and professional soldiers, or would you have us believe that the Polish soldiers who invaded Czechoslovakia in 1968 did so because they were patriots?
Wulkan - | 3,251
17 Nov 2015 #13
They did what they wanted or what were told to do?
Harry
17 Nov 2015 #15
They did what they wanted or what were told to do?

A patriot wouldn't invade another country just because he was told to do it, a professional soldier would. So, have you just proved my point or is Delph right?
Wulkan - | 3,251
17 Nov 2015 #16
So, have you just proved my point or is Delph right?

Neither. A soldier is obliged to follow orders, orders are made to serve his country he is patriot to.
Harry
17 Nov 2015 #17
Interesting that you consider the soldiers who enforced martial law in Poland were patriots. You do have a most original definition of patriotism.
privateer
24 Nov 2015 #18
The French Foreign Legion teaches its new inductees French. Poland wouldn't do that?

What if you get deported to Poland, would that mean you are an actual Polish citizen? I couldn't just go to Wroclaw, have my mothers parents produce my birth certificate and join like that?

I wouldn't mind being an Officer, but if they need more Privates I'm willing to be the latter.
InPolska 11 | 1,821
24 Nov 2015 #19
@Privateer: normal that they teach French since the French FOREIGN legion is mainly made up of foreigners ;) (among them a lot of Eastern Europeans and Germans for instance). I used to know an American who was at the time about to join. NOTHING to do with national armies.

Anyway, Foreign Legion (based in Corsica) has a great reputation in France.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,720
24 Nov 2015 #20
Poland wouldn't do that?

the clue is in the name. duh.
privateer 1 | 9
24 Nov 2015 #21
Yeah, but I just thought maybe Poland would be as cool as my folks truly say.
I'm not giving up. The legion will be my next choice, but I'm still hellbent on joining my heritages Forces.
dolnoslask
24 Nov 2015 #22
Privateer Thank you for your offer to serve Poland, can I suggest firstly join one of our Militia groups polskikorpusds.pl/, then use this as a stepping stone to the regulars, you will have to self finance this but if you are committed you will do it.
privateer 1 | 9
27 Nov 2015 #23
I can't read Polish. Could it be translated to English with a push of a button?

If not It's okay, I have found Polish language classes out in Chicago.

I do have 2 other questions: First, is there a video of the Land Forces being trained? I've only found videos of vehicles, and the Air Forces, and military up-gradation kinds. Great music, but I want more of a documentary video.

Second, my mother doesn't believe I'll ever join the Polish Land Forces. (She brought us here to the USA and will do anything to have us stay here and live the american dream that she's always wanted. She lies a lot.) She has told me that I wouldn't be able to join up because I didn't live from 1-18 in Poland, that Poland doesn't know who I am.

My birth certificate is in Wroclaw though, and my grandparents have never moved out of there.
Harry
27 Nov 2015 #24
She has told me that I wouldn't be able to join up because I didn't live from 1-18 in Poland

She isn't exactly right there, but at the moment she is pretty much right. You can't join the Polish army unless you are pretty much native speaker fluent in Polish. If you don't speak Polish, you are looking at at least several years of lessons in the USA before you are at that level.

I couldn't just go to Wroclaw, have my mothers parents produce my birth certificate and join like that?

As said above, being born in Poland does not make a person Polish.
privateer 1 | 9
27 Nov 2015 #25
It won't let me create a user either. Everytime I put in a password and repeat it it just doesn't pull through.

I do speak Polish, it's just the reading and writing portion I need to learn.

My Polish isn't perfect but it's enough to actually know what people Are talking about not just saying in Polish.
dolnoslask
27 Nov 2015 #26
"It won't let me create a user either. Everytime I put in a password and repeat it it just doesn't pull through"

Oh i get it now you are trying to log into your war game console doh
privateer 1 | 9
2 Dec 2015 #27
I've checked out Polish language training for beginners, I can already see myself improving. Maybe if I speak louder it'll improve greatly.

I'll return to the forums when I'm able to read adequately .

I don't have a console, a vehicle, a phone, just a skateboard and time. I'm 23, please show me who's really beneath who.
terri 1 | 1,665
2 Dec 2015 #28
In order to be able to speak Polish you will need at least 2 years of learning about 5 or 6 hours a day (this inc. reading, writing, speaking, listening). Can you do that? Otherwise - curtains for you.
mafketis 23 | 7,891
2 Dec 2015 #29
In order to be able to speak Polish you will need at least 2 years of learning about 5 or 6 hours a day

The school in £ódź used to take people with no previous knowledge of Polish and get them in shape for university courses in 8 months. Of course these were highly intelligent university students but the idea is that it is possible (if not easy) to make someone fluent quickly.

I don't know if that school is still in operation.
privateer 1 | 9
3 Dec 2015 #30
It wouldn't matter if it were open, I'm in the USA without a greencard.
I'm on a sort of supervision though. I make it to January 5th without an incident and they'll allow me to stay.
I'm going to be fine.
But then my probation continues up till December 5th of next year.
I got the time indefinitely. Maybe if I didn't have prior knowledge of Polish it could be 2 years of studying.
But I'm not being foolish about it, I stopped myself to Chapter 5 on a 12 CD course.
I'm relearning everything upto chapter 5 until I'm comfortable.
I can already see progress, its mainly the clusters and some extra letters that catch me off guard.

Once my probation is over I'll take what I've learned and figure out how exactly I'd get myself to Poland.
I should just go on the road and fund myself a ticket, one way, while seeing the rest of the states.
If I'm desperate and want to prove myself on a deeper level than just enlisting in the Armed Forces I'll head South to the warmer states. Then Northwest/West to California. North through Washington and Alaska/Canada- which'll take me West/South West through Russia to Asias coast. Which I follow to Europe.

The rest you can guess, surely.


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