The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Work  % width posts: 23

What is life like in Poland for a student?


gluehapfel 2 | 1
7 Aug 2013  #1
Since I know that I have Polish roots, I got very interested in Poland and thought about living and working there. I am also learning the language and inform myself about the culture, so that as soon as I finished my school I can move to Poland and go study there.

But there's one thing that has always kind of irked me, or that made me kind of skeptical:
Why do so many Poles leave Poland? Why do so many Poles study and work abroad? What is it about Poland that makes so many young people leave? I've never been there, so I don't really have an own impression. However,when I notice how many people leave Poland, I ask myself wether I really want to move there. What is it like living there, how much does an own flat cost, how is the quality of life? In fact I can't even think of many more question, I just want to know -anything- regarding life in Poland. What is different to other places, and is it a good idea to go study there, etc?

Hopefully everyone will understand what I am onto. ^^ Any info is good.

Thanks
DominicB - | 2,678
7 Aug 2013  #2
However,when I notice how many people leave Poland, I ask myself wether I really want to move there.

Smart kid. The reason so many people leave Poland is that it is easier to find a job abroad than in Poland. Also, Polish universities are generally not as good as their American or Western European counterparts. Poland is still a poor country compared to American and Western Europe, and life is more difficult. It would not be a good idea to study in Poland.

Having said that, I am an American with Polish roots who has been living in Poland for eleven years. Because I am a highly trained scientist, I've been able to make a decent living as a scientific translator here. Nothing like the money I earned working in the hospital in the States, but enough to get by, and without the stress. Fortunately, I don't have a family to support. If I did, I would not be living in Poland. I live in Wrocław, which is the nicest city in Poland.

Keep studying Polish, study at a good university in your country. And then when you are financially secure and self-sufficient, and have qualifications and experience that you can sell, move to Poland for a while and try it out.
pawian 161 | 9,846
8 Aug 2013  #3
I live in Wrocław, which is the nicest city in Poland.

I dare to disagree... :):)

But never mind, "every magpie praises only its own tail" ...... :):):)
DominicB - | 2,678
8 Aug 2013  #4
I dare to disagree... :):)

There's no accounting for taste.
pawian 161 | 9,846
8 Aug 2013  #5
You mean sth about beast and beholder?? :):)
Monitor 14 | 1,821
8 Aug 2013  #6
study at a good university in your country.

And what if he's Ukrainian :)
DominicB - | 2,678
8 Aug 2013  #7
If he's Ukranian, with English is as good as it is, he should consider studying in other countries besides Poland.
dany_moussalli 13 | 263
8 Aug 2013  #8
not as good as their American or Western European counterparts

what about studying for a bachelor degree in poland and then doing masters in western europe ?
Monitor 14 | 1,821
8 Aug 2013  #9
It's possible, but by starting in lower ranked uni you're loosing one chance of getting good diploma and maybe there will not be second in form of master. (because of no time, not so good marks, or lack of willingness of better uni to let you do master there)

And also good unis are usually in rich cities, so it's better to have colleagues from studies there, so they can recommend you for well paid job there. But studying only master there = less colleagues.
dany_moussalli 13 | 263
8 Aug 2013  #10
because of no time, not so good marks, or lack of willingness of better uni to let you do master there

no time mm there's time ,my bachelor is only 3 years (international business ) and i will probably do a master in finance .
no good marks ,i think i can manage ,i'm second in my university here (got 89 % ) but i have to go to poland due to the circumstances in my country .

or lack of willingness of better uni to let you do master there ,that's my biggest fear ,I have options though ,SGH warsaw is one of them (if i can't manage to get into my first option ) and SGH is ranked among the best in business schools .

But studying only master there = less colleagues.

good point ,but i must manage with what i got ...
ufo973 10 | 89
8 Aug 2013  #11
A boring country.
Lots of *******.
Cheap Piwa.

That is all about it.
Monitor 14 | 1,821
9 Aug 2013  #12
SGH is ranked among the best in business schools

I've heard that nearly 100% graduates of SGH get job in Warsaw quite fast, so it's a good choice for a Pole. But I don't know how it is with employment of foreigners with SGH diploma. (especially when one doesn't speak Polish or have no work permit)
Itis
9 Aug 2013  #13
I have been here for over two years now and I have mixed feelings about living in Poland. In terms of site seeing and history, I LOVE Poland! I really don't understand why Poland rarely makes it on many people's itineraries when travelling through Europe. Poland is a treasure trove of history and architecture! So, if you are interested in these aspects of Poland I would recommend spending some time here.

In terms of everyday living here, I find it more difficult. People are not as friendly in public as where I am from and this can make you feel isolated. People are conservative (also compared to where I am from) and prefer to stick to themselves in public - seems that if you try to have a friendly chat with a stranger they are afraid you want something from them (generally speaking, not everyone). So it's easier just to do the same and stick to yourself. Sure, when you make friends with Polish people they are friendly, but you don't spend all your time with friends so mostly it's the public face of Poland that you see. This lack of social warmth if you can call it that, is my biggest problem here and bothers me to the point that I have to say it makes me want to return to my home country. Most Polish people probably don't notice this and some may argue that it doesn't exist, but as it is so clearly visible to foreigners and Poles who have lived overseas for sometime, it's safe to say you are better to listen to expats on this topic rather than Polish people.

I'm a teacher here and I hear from most of my students of all different ages that cheating & bribery can exist in the education system. Not sure but perhaps something you might like to look into/question some more.

Might help to mention where you are from as different cultures have different views on these things. If you are from a conservative country, for example, this aspect of Poland won't be a problem for you...
Monitor 14 | 1,821
9 Aug 2013  #14
We are similar to Germans in this regard. We don't speak to strangers on the street and in public transport. I have heard that in Americas , Australia it's more common to talk to strangers thus feel less insulated.
polforeigner
9 Aug 2013  #15
Not a reference! No way to compare Poles with Germans; the former even if not too "warm" are at least friendly and modest whereas most (am not saying "all") Germans are loud, arrogant and obnoxious.
dany_moussalli 13 | 263
9 Aug 2013  #16
I've heard that nearly 100% graduates of SGH get job in Warsaw quite fast, so it's a good choice for a Pole. But I don't know how it is with employment of foreigners with SGH diploma. (especially when one doesn't speak Polish or have no work permit)

:does not speak polish" but in 5 years might :) ,and I'm a polish foreigner (I have a polish passport ) so the work permit isn't an issue .
Monitor 14 | 1,821
9 Aug 2013  #17
whereas most (am not saying "all") Germans are loud, arrogant and obnoxious.

not on the streets of Munich
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
10 Aug 2013  #18
Correct, monitor! I found the people in Dortmund, for instance, particularly loudmouthed and brazen:-)
Malone
10 Aug 2013  #19
People are not as friendly in public as where I am from and this can make you feel isolated.

That's basically applies for all northern european nations. Actually my experience shows that poles (and specially < 35 old one) are more approachable than germans, swedish, norwegians and czechs.

Isolation is something you have to learn to live with whenever you move to another culture, specially if you don't know the language.
pierogi2000 4 | 229
10 Aug 2013  #20
Americans have very superficial and depth-less relationships with each other. Typical American conversation:
"Hey. How are you?"
"Great. How are you?"
"Great. Okay, see you later."

Discussing issues such as politics or even everyday struggles belongs behind closed doors in your own home with the windows closed shut and locked. Meaning most Americans want to live their life in ignorance to the world around them. The less they know about you and the world around them, the less they have to face reality. This is not the case in European countries and especially Central/Eastern European. It will take longer to be-friend people from these regions but the relationships are MUCH more worth while & rewarding.

Speaking Polish is crucial in Poland. If you do not, you will be looked at as a user and treated as an outsider. Poles have a deep recent history of being manipulated and controlled by outsiders so they have no desire to continue this. Hence why it remains a homogeneous nation. I do not encounter that many Polish immigrants living in Non-English speaking nations. Poles are viewed as hard working whites, so they are more accepted in Western nations. And it is true work is difficult to find etc, but the family members I have living in Poland that focused on school and worked hard, are doing well. It honestly depends on the individual and the amount of effort they put forth. My experience is that many Poles still have an unhealthy infatuation with the USA & UK. The relatives I had visit me in Southern California stated they love the area as a vacation spot but not somewhere they would want to live.

I spent time in Wroclaw the past couple months and I was impressed at how vibrant, expanding and yet not over run by immigrants the city is. It is truly a place I could see myself leaving the USA for (and plan to). Berlin, although offering me more money and bigger lifestyle, is at times too random, dirty/over run by immigrants and ultimately not a Polish city. My Deutsche needs much improvement if I plan to go that route. If you were born in Europe like myself, you have a large advantage. I know my University offers study abroad programs but not sure about Poland. I don't think I would recommend doing my degree in Poland, the education system is different and takes some getting use to. If you are American, you might find the learning curve to be quite hard at first. Europeans in college are better and more focused students, while Americans simply strive to get by while "living in the greatest nation in history of human kind"
przypadkowa
10 Aug 2013  #21
I used to live in Poland ( my home country ) i used to live in Germany and US,
Now? I would not want to go back there, my choice is South America, I love the people, the culture, I love everything about it. Any country In south America is better than US or Europe.
pierogi2000 4 | 229
10 Aug 2013  #22
South America? I agree to an extent but it's still a very un-safe and poverty ridden continent.
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
10 Aug 2013  #23
As an American, pierogi, I can only concur with much of what you said. We are by in large superficial in our relationships, true, yet Europeans whom I've encountered (having lived there on and off for some time!) can frequently appear tactlessly abrupt, smug, arrogant in a different way from us Yanks, myopic and judgemental, often believing their way to be the only way - a path to which we poor Americans can only aspire, yet can never achieve:-)

Utopia cuts both ways, my friend. One man's superficiality is another's social lubrication. Perfection, like Utopia, is a chimera. It is pursued at one's own risk!


Home / Work / What is life like in Poland for a student?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.