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Englishman seeking non teaching work asap - to stay in Poland or ..?


delphiandomine 86 | 17920
29 Oct 2011 #31
I know that the market is very competitive and it's all about the connections!

Crazily so now, I now know at least two natives who just can't find work here at all. And this isn't even a particularly desirable city!

With that in mind, if you have a reputation for being unreliable or unqualified, then you're not going to get far.

Exactly. I'm more than happy to send potential clients your way these days, because I know that you're reliable and that you're going to get the job done. But I'd never recommend anyone who can't be bothered to spell properly in e-mails/on facebook, or who writes in an overly emotional way on here. And - really - I'm never going to recommend someone who blames Poland.

I have wiped teaching from my list of options. Neither am I experienced or confident, and I do not possess the dedication and commitment to gain a CELTA. Teaching is out! Its just not me! I'm interpreting richwright to be the same, somewhat.

If you don't have the experience, confidence, dedication and commitment to teach in Poland, you're not going to succeed here at all. All in all, teaching is one of the easier things here to do - short hours, often ridiculously easy (I have a group of adults who decided to have a party and get drunk last week instead of having a class, for instance - and I'm still paid for it) - and little responsibility beyond keeping the clients happy.

We have something like it in Poznań and one of my students work there, but it's not glamorous and the pay is terrible.

At least in Poznan, the one you're talking about (if it's the same place - the Easyjet call centre) would hire a native on the spot if they could do the job. On a Polish salary, of course.
hythorn 3 | 580
29 Oct 2011 #32
Crazily so now, I now know at least two natives who just can't find work here at all. And this isn't even a particularly desirable city!

good grief. that is really bad

so these guys who keep rolling up not speaking a word of Polish and expecting to get work are just wasting their time

the only thing that your average Brit has over a Pole is their ability to speak English like a native
rt3d 10 | 46
29 Oct 2011 #33
Hi,

Try this website: mtvnetworks.pl/kariera/jobs

i started from here.. and this what brought me to poland
HQ is in Warsaw.. very nice office and great pp to work with from the UK
just 2 jobs available for now if you can develop website using php
or a TV producer... or keep looking for new updates..
Nightglade 7 | 97
29 Oct 2011 #34
Crazily so now, I now know at least two natives who just can't find work here at all. And this isn't even a particularly desirable city!

But are they exploring all avenues, e.g. Gumtree, dropping CV's into language schools, sticking obnoxious papers over university campus message boards, etc? The demand for Natives seems to be quite high at the moment in regards to private lessons, but from what I've experienced schools are not prospering, at least in Poznań. One director was telling me about how the proposed changes to education taxing posed a big risk to their finances.

I think it's quite possible to make a living from private lessons but it will be extremely tiring. At first I was quite nervous regarding group lessons, but I found that in fact it was far more relaxed, particularly as you tend to ask a question you expect a short answer for and the class ends up waffling to each other for about 15 minutes.

At least in Poznan, the one you're talking about (if it's the same place - the Easyjet call centre) would hire a native on the spot if they could do the job. On a Polish salary, of course.

Ah I've heard of that one too, but frankly, listening to moaning passengers all day would drive me into a deep depression. I was referring to the phone service. They have a call centre for German and English clients.
delphiandomine 86 | 17920
29 Oct 2011 #35
But are they exploring all avenues, e.g. Gumtree, dropping CV's into language schools, sticking obnoxious papers over university campus message boards, etc?

Some secrets are best kept among friends ;) Interestingly, there seems to be more and more demand for native speakers to teach small children. Insanity, but good for those who can.

The demand for Natives seems to be quite high at the moment in regards to private lessons, but from what I've experienced schools are not prospering, at least in Poznań. One director was telling me about how the proposed changes to education taxing posed a big risk to their finances.

Yep - if they do bring in VAT on education, then the vast majority of schools will close. There's just no way people will be willing to pay an extra 23% on the cost of classes - and although it will force them to declare their income properly (you'd be surprised how much tax fiddling goes on...), it'll just push more and more students towards teachers that can provide them with small groups without the taxman knowing anything. In a sense, this is good news for teachers who are motivated to actually do something.

I think it's quite possible to make a living from private lessons but it will be extremely tiring. At first I was quite nervous regarding group lessons, but I found that in fact it was far more relaxed, particularly as you tend to ask a question you expect a short answer for and the class ends up waffling to each other for about 15 minutes.

Yeah, I always found the best way was to have a mix of groups and private classes - the groups are less stressful (and it's much easier to kill time), but the private classes are independent of anyone else, especially witches. Not naming names, of course...

Ah I've heard of that one too, but frankly, listening to moaning passengers all day would drive me into a deep depression. I was referring to the phone service. They have a call centre for German and English clients.

Me too, I can't imagine spending 8 hours on the phone listening to people whine and complain because they booked the flight for the wrong day because their dog barked at their child or some such rubbish.

so these guys who keep rolling up not speaking a word of Polish and expecting to get work are just wasting their time

Pretty much - although - if you turn up in a smallish town (let's say 20,000-50,000) - you'll get your hand bitten off. A tale of two markets, so to speak.

But turning up in a place like Krakow with no papers, no experience and expecting people to offer you work just isn't going to happen. Krakow and Wroclaw are full of them, Poznan has more and more people willing to work for peanuts, the list goes on. Mind you - if you have something to offer (like significant real world experience) - you can still earn decent money.

the only thing that your average Brit has over a Pole is their ability to speak English like a native

You know, I'm meeting more and more Poles who even speak like natives. For instance - I met a girl at our Thursday language meetings who is 19 - and already speaks with a very posh English accent and has no problems with talking to Brits with different accents. Why bother with a native when you can hire someone like that for half the price?

I keep saying it on here - you can make a very good living, but e-mailing CV's to language schools simply isn't going to cut it in the vast majority of cities.
Kazikowski 17 | 101
29 Oct 2011 #36
If you don't have the experience, confidence, dedication and commitment to teach in Poland, you're not going to succeed here at all. All in all, teaching is one of the easier things here to do

Okay so you say its one of the easiest ways to earn a living. But what I mean is, for me, teaching will be as unpleasant as as working in a call centre. I never considered myself to BE a teacher. I don't care for it, and I'd rather put my efforts into doing something that I will enjoy. Still have to find out what that could be.

Delph, I agree with you that anyone who doesn't put 100% dedication into whatever they do, won't succeed.
Foreigner4 12 | 1768
29 Oct 2011 #37
^
An astute and objective observation. One really has to come to terms with who they are when deciding what they will do. Best of luck.


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