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Emigrate from the USA - the sequence of events


perkujki 4 | 25
26 Sep 2012 #1
I've seen similar posts regarding emigrating to Poland but most are people from EU countries. I am interested in learning the procedures and timing for establishing residence in Poland. My wife holds dual citizenship USA\Poland as do our children. I only have USA citizenship. In a few years we are planning on permanently moving to Poland. So the question is what is the sequence of events; getting them registered as residents, then health cards? Once my wife has her residence card then can I apply for my residency? We plan on purchasing a flat before we move so we will already have a residence once we move. I have read I need to apply with in 45 days. FYI, all of our marriage and birth records have already been registered in Poland. thx
bkzu - | 2
4 Oct 2012 #2
I am not really really sure why you would like to move to Poland, but hey to each his own :)
OP perkujki 4 | 25
22 Oct 2012 #3
Simple, family, friends, and eye on retirement.

On the contrary, I would not recommend anyone moving to the USA.
Harry
22 Oct 2012 #4
I'm uncertain what you mean by "health cards".
MoOli 9 | 484
22 Oct 2012 #5
eye on retirement

exactly what I had in mind and started working on it years back,things like heavy property taxes,insurance,maintence fee etc ,health insurance and general cost of living.Another thing I like is you can travel europe in hours and be in a whole new world.Some things like car insurance, electronics are quite expensive but so what can be got from the states(electronics not insurance).Where the hell a doctor will come to your house for a stomachache or toothache for 120pln:)

Perk, you will have to apply for a 2 year residency card,since you have your marriage and birth certificates registered,Oh also that your marriage certificate should not be older then 6 months of the date of issue,but one can get a new one easily from the same office that issued you also be sent to you by mail or expedite it,after 2 years you will have to get another 2 years card and after total of 31/2 years you can apply for your permanent resident card,also within issue of 6 months you can apply for citizenship which they have to repond with decision in 60 days or after 6 months you will have to apply for citizenship to the president which I have heard can take well over 2 years ,and with new law this year you will have to pass a polish language test to become a citizen(luckily I didnt have to) after all done 30 days wait for your id card and another 60 days after that for passport.These are the current rules.

About health card there is nothing,just like in the states hospitals will serve you and bill you afterwards,one can also buy a cheap insurance for 300Pln a year per person and a good insurance for almost 150$ a month.I suggest both as it is safer and you are covered for any major medical as well minor day to day.
OP perkujki 4 | 25
25 Oct 2012 #6
Harry, I meant how do you sign up for the national health plan, and if you are working, then is it automatically taken care of as a payroll deduction? Here you generally don't receive health coverage until after having worked 90 days and buying private insurance is ridiculously expensive.

OK thanks, that points me in the right direction. What do you mean though about having a marriage certificate with a recent date? I think we have a Polish certificate or acknowledgement of our USA marriage. If I remember correctly we had to register the marriage in Poland to get a kids their Polish Passports. 300ZL a year for health insurance per person. You can pay that much per month here and still have to pay a great deal out of pocket.
4 eigner 2 | 831
25 Oct 2012 #7
On the contrary, I would not recommend anyone moving to the USA

you must be in dire straits, man. There's nothing wrong with living here if you have a good job. I lived in Poland for a while and however Poland is a nice country, I wouldn't want to live there for good. It all depends on what one expects and I guess, the emotions are playing a role in it too.
MoOli 9 | 484
25 Oct 2012 #8
You can pay that much per month here and still have to pay a great deal out of pocket

Tell me...I am paying 1600$ a month with 1000 major medical deductable and co pay of doctor visit with 30$ and 35 for medication for 3 members that too with a company group by blue cross blue shield,one good reason to immigrate to Poland:)Talk about fuking OBAMA care!who build us our business.
pip 10 | 1,661
25 Oct 2012 #9
that is not Obama care- that is the insurance companies that are not regulated.

anyway, there is public health care here. there is nothing wrong with it. some areas of Poland offer better service than others. There is also private care. There are a few companies, but they are a business and money comes first- I have dealt with them. Now I do a combination of both. For tests I pay and get my results the next day and for other things I go to public care.

we don't really get sick as a family- so we pay as we go.
OP perkujki 4 | 25
25 Oct 2012 #10
We are part of the dying blue collar middle class. I work for an internationally recognized company with a good paying job. As long as we don't get sick or hurt, or the company moves operations, we're fine. Three big iffs. Our kids will come out of college though with a 5 figure debt. Instead of saving for a house they'll be paying off college. Health care is not Obama's fault. The problem is we don't have a health care system. We have a health care industry that operates on a profit motive at every step of the way from the insurance to the providers. All at our expense. There is a growing movement of retirees moving out of the country. Most are moving to central America where they are building large developments and catering to the American diaspora. The biggest reasons are cashing in on your home's value, stretching retirement money, and health care cost. We're just looking to do the same but in Poland because we have a large family there and i don't like tropical climates. (yes I like the cold)
4 eigner 2 | 831
25 Oct 2012 #11
The problem is we don't have a health care system

are you sure, you live in the States? I have a great insurance and many people I know, have it too.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
25 Oct 2012 #12
are you sure, you live in the States?

Surprise,surprise looks like US is a third world country, as of September of this year US Census Bureau reported 48.6 million people as uninsured down from 50 million the year before.
MoOli 9 | 484
25 Oct 2012 #13
I have a great insurance and many people I know, have it too

You must have been working for a good company dude average good insurance costs around 3500 per person per month,and average person cannot afford this a month as it can be ones mortgage.I pay 1600$ a month for 3 people as a group in a small company with heavy deductable and co pay.Imagine individuals who do get treated and then the medical bills take over there house.In states either you pay or you dont have anything to pay is the motto.
4 eigner 2 | 831
25 Oct 2012 #14
Surprise,surprise looks like US is a third world country, as of September of this year US Census Bureau reported 48.6 million people as uninsured down from 50 million the year before.

LOL you're nuts, man. How does that make us a third world country, huh? It's not really a question, so don't bother replying to it. I already know how you feel about us, no need to repeat your bs again and again.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
25 Oct 2012 #15
You’re kidding right? 50 million without access to healthcare and God knows how many starving each day and you think of yourself as ………. LOL. No wonder people start abandoning the sinking ship and we have threads like this.
4 eigner 2 | 831
25 Oct 2012 #16
You’re kidding right? 50 million without access to healthcare and God knows how many starving each day and you think of yourself as ………. LOL

and yet it doesn't make the US a third world country. We have food stamps and charities allover the place in the US and no one has starve here and if one does, he's either uninformed or too dumb to find help. Yes, we have poverty but who does not? Do you think, there's no poverty in Poland or Canada? (Know both countries, can't tell me fairy tales)

No wonder people start abandoning the sinking ship and we have threads like this.

Successful people and people who are making it here are not leaving. Besides, there's an obvious connection to Poland in his case (and many other cases on PF where people are going back to Poland) and it's obvious, people who struggle, choose to struggle in the country they originally came from.
pip 10 | 1,661
25 Oct 2012 #17
of course there is poverty, but those same poor people will NEVER be refused health care because they don't have insurance.
4 eigner 2 | 831
25 Oct 2012 #18
but those same poor people will NEVER be refused health care because they don't have insurance

same here. By law, they can't refuse any patient needing help (emergency). Then in regular cases, people without health care can always get helped using one of the charities (which pay the bill).
TheOther 6 | 3,821
25 Oct 2012 #19
and yet it doesn't make the US a third world country.

But we are on the best way to become one:

- 50+ million people without health insurance
- Medicare and Medicaid as we know it about to be disposed (sooner or later, depending on when the Republicans are back in power)
- Ever increasing costs for healthcare (some plans have yearly rate increases of 20% and more)
- Social Security bankrupt soon
- Public school system in shambles
- Exploding costs for higher education ($ 1 trillion in student loan debt)
- Unemployment rate for the 16 - 25 year olds: approx. 18%
- Decreasing home values
- and so on and so forth

And what's Mitt's idea? Increase the military budget... :)

but those same poor people will NEVER be refused health care because they don't have insurance

And who pays for these people? The ones that still have a job. Have you ever asked yourself how much longer that will that be possible given the fact that costs are exploding everywhere (see above)?
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
25 Oct 2012 #20
He's in dire straits, most of us are not.

Most of you are, you simply choose to close your eyes to what’s happening out there. Blame the bad economic decisions of both political parties who cater only to select few on the average Joe’s laziness as if that’s the culprit. Face it, if you don’t reverse the trend it will lead to even worse economic reality for your citizens than that of the third world countries, your perceptions won’t help you to turn the things around either, neither will calling me names.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
25 Oct 2012 #21
ShortHairThug,are you sure you're not making this stuff up about droves of people starving in this country?I'm curios as to why you would say this.Interesting......
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
25 Oct 2012 #22
Are you saying you don’t have poverty problem? I suppose you have no homeless people either? If you mean starving as in famine then no but there’s plenty of American families out there who are forced to make a hard choice and their kids have to skip meals just so they can get by as living from paycheck to paycheck is not enough anymore. Are you denying that? I wonder why that is.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
25 Oct 2012 #23
ShortHaiThug,there's a difference between missing a meal and starving.We've had Homeless before the recession and there will be after it as well.We are far from being a third world country and I think you full well know this.We've always had poverty and always will. I'll let you in on a little secret;if the United States goes bankrupt it will have dire consequences on the World economy.Look what just happened whem Wall street hit the wall a while back.This is fact.
4 eigner 2 | 831
25 Oct 2012 #24
Are you saying you don’t have poverty problem? I suppose you have no homeless people either?

of course we do, mainly in big cities (in some ghettos in Chicago, NYC etc) but it doesn't mean that we're mainly poor people here and is this what you're trying to say all the time.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
25 Oct 2012 #25
We've always had poverty and always will.

Not as much, seeing a bum once in a while begging is one thing but have you go to stores recently? I have people are watching every penny these days. Seeing how one was treated recently at a car mechanic shop in Chicago was a real eye opener for me, no compassion whatsoever for the poor soul, it’s not the America I visited a decade ago. Things really changed there.
4 eigner 2 | 831
25 Oct 2012 #26
it’s not the America I visited a decade ago

it's not the world it used to be a decade ago either.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
25 Oct 2012 #27
I have always seen homeless,I live in Boston and there are new construction sites every day and the stores are always packed.My point is that we are in a recession,but the picture you paint is that we are in dire straights and this is simply not true.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
25 Oct 2012 #28
My point is that we are in a recession,but the picture you paint is that we are in dire straights and this is simply not true.

Perhaps you don’t see it as it happens on a daily basis to you and you’re used to it but for me the change is obvious seeing how people used to shop 10 years ago vs. now, haw many more people on the streets etc.

I live in Boston and there are new construction sites every day and the stores are always packed

That suppose to prove what exactly? In the 80’s stores were also packed in Poland yet there was nothing to buy. People shop differently these days’ only basic necessities.
p3undone 8 | 1,135
25 Oct 2012 #29
I've lived in several parts of the country and this has always been the case.Like I said the picture that you paint is simply not true.I have lived in the U.S. all my life and there has always been ghettos,homeless and poverty and this is nothing new.So unless you've lived here all your life;you have nothing to compare it to.The homeless were always treated like dirt.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
25 Oct 2012 #30
Simply observing the shopping habits of people paint a different picture for you. Walk through the aisles see how they discuss prices substituting one brand for another because the price is cheaper or vs. those in the other store. This tells me Americans have a lot less to spend even on the most basics and that’s not the way I remember it from years ago. Americans are getting poorer and poorer and that’s a fact.


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