The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Life  % width posts: 33

Emigrate / Immigrate to Poland? I don't need to work.


NODUFF 5 | 13
23 Sep 2014 #1
I'm seriously thinking about selling up - selling my house and all my useless possessions - and moving to Poland.
I have travelled the world, and lived in many countries, however, I have developed a genuine interest with Poland.
I have visited Poland as a backpacker tourist several times and thoroughly enjoyed my experiences, which makes me want more.
However I am aware of the harsh realities that exist in respect of visiting a place and living in a place.
So here my question begins - where do I go? where do I avoid? I don't need to work, but the option would be nice. I like rural and scenic, but don't we all?
PC_Sceptic - | 70
23 Sep 2014 #2
So here my question begins - where do I go?

Western Poland, Wielkopolska, DolnoŚląskie, Lubuskie or Zachodnio-Pomorskie województwa=voivodeships. and city of Cracow.
Bieszczady, minor mountains(South East Poland) peaceful if you like trekking with backpack, perfect place.
Unless you like buzzing, then go to Warsaw.
Avoid East.
This is my personal opinion.
Jardinero 1 | 407
23 Sep 2014 #3
So here my question begins - where do I go?

Well, in order to receive meaningful answers to your question, I'm afraid you would need to put in little more effort and at the very minimum state what your preferences, what you like (dislike) to do, etc.

city of Cracow

Good location if you were planning to travel south, nice to visit and culturally vibrant, but the downside is that it tends to be touristy and the air is very polluted (one of the worst locations in the EU in that category)...

Avoid East.

Where exactly and and why?
PC_Sceptic - | 70
23 Sep 2014 #4
the downside is that it tends to be touristy and the air is very polluted (one of the worst locations in the EU in that category)...

I know what you mean, I was going to school there for few years. The reason that is polluted is that it lies in the valley, same thing like Los Angeles.

I do hope that the"Huta" is closed by now.

Where exactly and and why?

South is polluted and too crowded, I have in mind Śląsk=Silesia
Well Mazury are kinda North East, and i loved sailing there, hated the mosquitoes though.

Poland remains at the distant nineteenth place in the EU's competitiveness ranking . The most developed region of the country remains Mazovia, and the least - Warmia and Masuria . The European Commission appreciates our level of basic education. Not the best present for a Polish company , which is still rarely use modern technology.

The European Commission has published " EU Regional Competitiveness Index : RCI 2013 ' . The indicator is used to evaluate the different dimensions of competitiveness at national and regional level - shows the strengths and weaknesses of individual provinces (NUTS level 2 regions in the EU methodology).

Why? Well, it is based on history and personal experience as well, but my experience is out of date a bit.

Western Poland is more developed, infrastructure is much better, closer to go for beer to Berlin, unless one likes go to Minsk.
Eastern Poland was neglected during partitioning, it is catching up but still way to go, After the WW II border changes, people from "kresy" were moved to western Poland but they got to much better infrastructure.

West is more vibrant, cities like Wrocław or Poznań, Szczecin is also beautiful, tons of parks and looks so green, close to seaside. Pomerania also have lots of lakes if one likes to sail.

Anyhow read this,

Four province of Poland produce more than half of gross domestic product and per capita GDP is higher there than in the other twelve provinces. Statistical data show that the uneven distribution of economic potential and development is sustainable and deepens.

While in 1999, Lower Silesia , AB , BC and Greater produced a total of 50.4% of GDP, in 2008-2010 the share of the four provinces increased to 52.6 %.

Despite the huge financial outlay for the development of economically less developed regions , increasing the difference between the richer and poorer regions . This phenomenon is known in many European countries , especially in Italy . Supporting poorer regions , however, leads to the economic development of the less developed countries. Regional policy support poorer regions make sense without the progressive degradation would occur in these regions. The more economically developed regions usually develop faster than the rest of the country. It works kind of virtuous cycle . Attractive to investors are usually wealthy regions and subsequent new investors make is to increase the attractiveness and attract new investors . Less economically developed regions often experience a reverse mechanism .

Bottom line is (from my prospective) I would love to barricade myself in small town or even lone standing house in the forest, but knowing that if I wanted I can be within hour or two back to civilization for a day, shopping, go to see a play at theater, or whatever.
Dougpol1 32 | 3,296
23 Sep 2014 #5
in small town

As others have said OP - whatever you do - do not do this. You would shoot yourself (or somebody else) within a year - of course guns are not easy to come by, but trust me, anything is better than finding yourself alienated in a backwater Polish town.

There are three things you could do there to pass the time:

1. Go to church twice a day and thank God for your (miserable) existence.
2. Look at púrn, morning, noon, and night
3. Eventually drink yourself to death.

I would do two of these.
PC_Sceptic - | 70
23 Sep 2014 #6
Years ago I was thinking just like you. To be in a Big City. yeah, way to fly.
Anyhow I don't and never watched any prn, don't drink, maybe a glass or two of wine from time to time with nice dinner, don't remember the last time I was in the Church.

Trust me I wouldn't be bored. I have enough of steel glass and concrete.
Dougpol1 32 | 3,296
23 Sep 2014 #7
don't remember the last time I was in the Church.

The priest would be round to visit - and the locals wouldn't let you cut the grass on a Sunday - or actually do much of anything.

Unless you plan to build a high fence to fly the flag and to deny them entry - and paradoxically to lock yourself in?

It amuses me how people love to live in these gated communities with wire fencing - where it would take them 15 minutes to walk around the outside of the complex to visit their neighbours in the next wire fenced "community" 50 metres from their property - all in the interests of "security".

There are snobs - and then there are Polish snobs. At least you would be free of them in a smaller environment.
Jardinero 1 | 407
23 Sep 2014 #8
All sounds so cliche. All depends what the OP is after - no universal one size fits all in the run to happiness in this life, I'm afraid. Here's an interesting [realearth.pl/ueberuns_en.htm] of an original Swiss couple who have settled in the very NE corner some 20 years ago...
peter_olsztyn 6 | 1,098
24 Sep 2014 #9
and moving to Poland

OMG. Why not to Denmark or Sweden?

Avoid East.

Thank you.
Jardinero 1 | 407
24 Sep 2014 #10
The OP is clearly asking about Poland and not any other country, and it seems to me they're in the right place this being the PFs.com.

Western Poland is more developed, infrastructure is much better

Agreed. However, you're being a mind-reader here by assuming that the OP values those above all. Let them come back and be more precise about what they're after - otherwise such random advise is not very valuable.

PC_Sceptic:Avoid East.
Thank you.

Please back up your view - maybe others reading this post could benefit from your knowledge.
Dougpol1 32 | 3,296
24 Sep 2014 #11
Seriously though Noduff - why choose to live here if you don't want to work/or have to work here? As others have asked - what are you looking for?

The summers are barely 3 (three) months long and the heating bills are huge - even when you do the log fire and underfloor heating bit..............

Plus there is no community spirit to speak of, if you are used to an Anglo-Saxon understanding of the same.

People will not greet you in the street, unless you have a dog or are a fixture....

I live here because of the work, but the long dark days are a bit of a ........ to say the least.
Nathans
24 Sep 2014 #12
The summers are barely 3 (three) months long and the heating bills are huge - even when you do the log fire and underfloor heating bit.

You're right; if the weather was better Poland would be more attractive for expats. It's still cheaper to live than in Germany or the UK, for example. No?
PC_Sceptic - | 70
24 Sep 2014 #13
There are snobs - and then there are Polish snobs. At least you would be free of them in a smaller environment.

I said what I personally would do, didn't suggest to the OP poster that he or she must do what I would do.
Gosh you are paranoid,, wires, (electric ones?) security issues?....no comment.

Agreed. However, you're being a mind-reader here by assuming that the OP values those above all.

Of course I cannot read someone mind, thus I proposed many regions.

Thank you.

At least someone agrees with something that I've wrote

The OP is clearly asking about Poland and not any other country

Relax, I only mentioned proximity to our neighbours, no more no less. People travel, don't they?
My Dutch friend (not Polish) do shopping in Germany once a month.

If one insist to visit neighbor of Poland from the eastern flank then I would suggest Estonia or Latvia.

And I still stand by that Minsk is not the place to go for anything not to mention the distance. No offense to Belarusians.
And Ukraine is on "stand by" for the moment.
From the southern flank, both Slovakia and Czech Republic are charming. Prague is delicious.

So @Dougpol1 even with my personal perfect spot to live using the words-barricade myself-I would still move around from time to time.
Jardinero 1 | 407
25 Sep 2014 #14
If posters stuck to the topic instead of going off on a tangent this forum would have a chance of being half-useful (the other problem being over representation by the perpetually frustrated types).

As a rough guide, in terms of attractiveness of the landscape and scenery the central part of the country is probably most boring - hence I would recommend either the north or the south (with the eastern flanks being culturally richer & diverse).
Dougpol1 32 | 3,296
25 Sep 2014 #15
I am sticking to the topic.

The OP said he doesn't need to work.

Vis a vis he would be mad to come here IMO. Why? As above, there would be no social life akin to the life he knows through his culture and traditions. It's a working life and the people you meet through work that makes a foreign country interesting.

If he (the OP) were a writer such as Gore Vidal, who famously said (sic) of his adopted country, that Italy's problems were not his problems, (and so he had the best of both worlds), or can travel at the drop of a hat - then no problem; but if so, why would he be asking us?

Does that answer your question?

PS Not frustrated - just living with reality. And it's boringly dark here in Gdynia at 9 a.m. and the radiators are full on - in September. Maybe me and the OP can do a house swap?
Jardinero 1 | 407
25 Sep 2014 #16
For a start, please re-read (and don't forget to understand!) OP's message.
Dougpol1 32 | 3,296
25 Sep 2014 #17
But I do understand it. He says where should he go? I say - not Poland - for the reasons I have mentioned.
OP NODUFF 5 | 13
25 Sep 2014 #18
Apologies for my absence.
I'm soon to be retired with a reasonable pension at the tender age of 49, which is why I wouldn't have to work.
I'm fascinated with languages and have been learning Polish, on and off, for several years.
My trips to Poland have been many and varied, but one thing remains constant and that is a 'feeling of happiness' when I'm in Poland.

I know there was trouble in the Garden of Eden, and I'm not looking for paradise. But I genuinely like Poland and the people of Poland, their friendliness has been overwhelming at times. I doubt it's because I have cash to throw about, because I don't, I travel light on a tight budget and am at best described as frugal.

I have travelled the world, lived every moment, met some awful people and met some delightful people - I'm far from being naive in any respect, which is why I posted this thread - I wanted to see what words of wisdom I could gather from those in the know, those living the reality of Poland on a full time day to day basis.

The log cabin dream in the country side is of course a dream, I know the harsh reality of such exists only in films and for the millionaire brigade, but I'd opt for something similar or like as opposed to the hustle and bustle of city life.

With regard to the community spirit, well if there is none, it will be on parr with what we currently have in the UK. I revolve in a society where no one has time to care, but I survive just fine.

I apologise if my post has caused some misunderstandings, but each and every response is massively appreciated, I really do value them, thank you.
Dougpol1 32 | 3,296
25 Sep 2014 #19
The log cabin dream in the country side is of course a dream, I know the harsh reality of such exists only in films and for the millionaire brigade, but I'd opt for something similar or like as opposed to the hustle and bustle of city life.

Then the Beskidy Noduff - but the Czech Beskidy - because the Poles have NO respect for any concept of a green belt. They think it's something you would wear to hold your trousers up.

I would advise strongly against buying a house next to a forest in Poland. People will notice your isolation and come and build a group of houses next door to keep you company. Test my theory by going with your lady to the cinema. Sit apart from anybody else. Within two minutes another couple will come and sit right next to you to "keep you company" although there is plenty of room elsewhere.

This is weird behaviour and some anthropologist/sociologist may be along to explain......

There is no peace and quiet to be found anywhere in Poland. The whole countryside has been completely ruined by indiscriminate building.

Try the Czech Republic. It has building laws and property is actually worth something - if you want solitude.

Here to help:)
Bieganski 17 | 901
26 Sep 2014 #20
People will notice your isolation and come and build a group of houses next door to keep you company. Test my theory by going with your lady to the cinema. Sit apart from anybody else. Within two minutes another couple will come and sit right next to you to "keep you company" although there is plenty of room elsewhere.

Why on Earth is a carpetbagger complaining about where native Poles decide to sit in a public theater in Poland or build a home for themselves on Polish land?

There is no doubt that you think you are entitled to have the best viewing seats in the cinema all to yourself.

This is weird behaviour and some anthropologist/sociologist may be along to explain......

Indeed it is! This is akin to the same sort of petty territorial frustration expressed by British tourists when holidaying Germans routinely beat them to the sunloungers in all the prime spots around a common swimming pool.

I'm surprised you didn't mention that you get annoyed with the management and staff at Polish cinemas too when they prevent you from bringing your dog in with you. Just like you do when you admit to going around and harassing Polish restaurants and pubs as well as train conductors with your canine in tow and being incensed that no one displays gushing emotion and free accommodation to what is obviously the only friend you have in all of Poland. This sort of behavior is displayed by people who have become marginalized in society because of their inability and (more often than not) their unwillingness to be social with other human beings. This is particularly the case for many foreigners who have elected to reside in Poland (usually without invitation) and then refuse to integrate.
Dougpol1 32 | 3,296
26 Sep 2014 #21
"Theaters"? When was the last time you were in Poland?

I made an opinion based on observation of your mother country and you clearly haven't been here.

And the environment is not the Poles' to ruin, so it's not OK that Poland has no cast iron planning laws.

And keep the mutt out of it. :)
Jardinero 1 | 407
26 Sep 2014 #22
'm fascinated with languages and have been learning Polish, on and off, for several years.
My trips to Poland have been many and varied, but one thing remains constant and that is a 'feeling of happiness' when I'm in Poland.

Glad to hear from a positive person for a change. I feel your interest and motivation for Poland are genuine and thus wish you all the best in your road to living out your dream. Let me know if you needed more specifics, etc, I'll do my best to help out (note: my PM does not seem to work for some reason).

The log cabin dream in the country side is of course a dream, I know the harsh reality of such exists only in films and for the millionaire brigade, but I'd opt for something similar or like as opposed to the hustle and bustle of city life.

And it is a perfectly achievable dream (check out the link to the Swiss couple's site I pasted in my earlier response for confirmation + inspiration). They've done it 20 years ago, and with PL joining the EU since I cannot imagine it being more difficult in terms of the bureaucracy. And cost of land here is still a fraction of what it is in the UK.

Once again, congratulations on your courage to live out your dream and best of luck.
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,720
26 Sep 2014 #23
"With regard to the community spirit, well if there is none, it will be on parr with what we currently have in the UK. I revolve in a society where no one has time to care, but I survive just fine"

If you cannot find any community spirit in the UK you certainly will not be able to find it somewhere where you dont even speak the language.
jon357 63 | 14,698
26 Sep 2014 #24
I would advise strongly against buying a house next to a forest in Poland. People will notice your isolation and come and build a group of houses next door to keep you company. Test my theory by going with your lady to the cinema. Sit apart from anybody else. Within two minutes another couple will come and sit right next to you to "keep you company" although there is plenty of room elsewhere.

Yes. One of the few places where living on a busy main road is seen as more desirable than seclusion. Also, people tend to avoid living somewhere remote in PL due to infrastructure and vulnerability to crime.

With regard to the community spirit, well if there is none, it will be on parr with what we currently have in the UK.

The UK has one of the highest levels of volunteering and community work in the world and a recent survey showed that PL has the lowest in Europe.

but one thing remains constant and that is a 'feeling of happiness' when I'm in Poland.

Then you should move there if you feel that way - you could well have found what you're looking for. Remember that living somewhere is very different than just visiting - don't buy right away, live there for some time and then you'll have a better perspective of where you want to settle.

"Theaters"? When was the last time you were in Poland?I made an opinion based on observation of your mother country and you clearly haven't been here.

Never - and it isn't his 'mother country'.
Dougpol1 32 | 3,296
26 Sep 2014 #25
And cost of land here is still a fraction of what it is in the UK.

Because any concern can come and build a ******* great big plant next to your dream plot - that's why :)

Try Rekowo-Gorne for size. A beautiful forest vista ruined when the new Zoeller plant could be on the highway to Slupsk 5 kilometres down the road. Instead the council place it in the countryside on the road to the seaside?

Only in Poland - and you want me to be positive?



jon357 63 | 14,698
26 Sep 2014 #26
Try Rekowo-Gorne for size. A beautiful forest vista ruined when the new Zoeller plant could be on the highway to Slupsk 5 kilometres down the road. Instead the council place it in the countryside on the road to the seaside?

The road going north from Warsaw through £omianki is the same - companies just build whatever they like and billboards everywhere.
Buggsy 8 | 98
26 Sep 2014 #27
I'm soon to be retired with a reasonable pension at the tender age of 49, which is why I wouldn't have to work.

You sound like a very cautious person but I don't think you are likely to get good answers from here.
Judging by the replies ,so far, you should ask yourself what the average age of members on this forum is.
At 49- I guess it's something you've thoroughly thought through.
There are many sides to Polish reality and most of it is very difficult to grasp.
Living here alone will take you a long time, that is if you don't throw in the towel sooner, to really understand life and live

as a local. If you have family connections and work hard on your language skills you stand a very good chance.
My mate is 61 this year and is thinking of retiring here but letting out his house in Cheltenham
and see if he can adjust to life in Polska. He is been coming here for the past 15years and admits that
it will be hard for him even though he would like to retire here. Among other things he worries about are:
Healthcare and living next to neighbours who sometimes burn tyres to heat their house.
Coming down here, to see if you can make it, for a couple of years before you permanently settle-
sounds like a very good idea indeed.
Good luck!
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,720
26 Sep 2014 #28
Judging by the replies ,so far, you should ask yourself what the average age of members on this forum is.

he has had some sensible and mature responses IMO - how old do you think people are here, teenagers?
Here is someone whining about the lack of community spirit and that they are thinking of moving to a country where they dont know the language to find it..........hmmmm.

I wonder if he does anything to contribute to the community in the UK? I really doubt it, he sounds immature if anyone does.
Bieganski 17 | 901
26 Sep 2014 #29
"Theaters"? When was the last time you were in Poland?

My goodness, you claim to be in Poland and are puzzled that there could be theaters. Yes, there are. Many in fact, all across Poland.

I made an opinion based on observation of your mother country and you clearly haven't been here.

You make opinions about Poland which consistently show your own awkwardness when out in public. That being the case it is very odd that you would be on here giving advice to others that they should go to other countries instead.

Never - and it isn't his 'mother country'.

So says the seasonal tourist.
jon357 63 | 14,698
26 Sep 2014 #30
Healthcare and living next to neighbours who sometimes burn tyres to heat their house.

The rent from a house in Cheltenham may help cushion those worries and when push comes to shove as long as your friend is near an airport, the UK and free healthcare is only a couple of hours away.

and as I said before, your friend should choose carefully where he wants to live and don't buy right away.

Coming down here, to see if you can make it, for a couple of years before you permanently settle-sounds like a very good idea indeed.

Yes. 100x yes. Staying somewhere is very different from living somewhere and as I said before, it's better to choose carefully where he wants to live and don't buy right away.

Here is someone whining about the lack of community spirit and that they are thinking of moving to a country where they dont know the language to find

Exactly. You can't expect people to go about their lives using a foreign language just because an immigrant neighbour hasn't learnt theirs.

So says the seasonal tourist.

That doesn't make sense, not least since I've lived there for longer than you've been alive. Or are likely to be if you go round saying things like that in real life, without the cushion of the internet.


Home / Life / Emigrate / Immigrate to Poland? I don't need to work.
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.