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Warning to British people visiting Poland!! Don't get drunk and smash the place up!


Patrycja19 63 | 2,699
10 Aug 2007 #211
I believe Poland is being used up at the moment and is losing its identity.

how.. nothing can take polands identity away lef.. even if they put ten new stores
up. poland will always be poland..

I can see your point about certain things, but poland needs to grow, she is behind
in alot of things thats why her economy is so bad.. thats why people left to work
in better jobs.. she needs a face lift.. do you really think people will let go
of their culture.. stop going to church and teaching values?

do you really think people will let go
of their culture.. stop

and to add to this, even in America the Polish culture is strong, chicago being
one of the most populated areas.. they still wear folk dress and dances and
food and fun and its not going anywhere lef, especially in the strongest place its
originated from..
Wroclaw 44 | 5,386
11 Aug 2007 #212
We liberated you from Nazi oppression, our lads sacrificing their lives for your freedom

Another re-write of WWII history.
glowa 1 | 291
11 Aug 2007 #213
We liberated you from Nazi oppression, our lads sacrificing their lives for your freedom

i don't think so, although a longer discussion would be pointless. :)

Why is it wrong to visit Poland...

it's not. ignoring those voices is the best policy. myself, I find it iteresting to meet foreigners in Poland and learn about their experiences in my country, especially since only throughout recent years we see large increase in numbers of westerners visiting the place (except for the Germans, they've always been there, at least where I come from). don't worry mate, you want to go and have cheaper fun in Poland, GO AHEAD! :)
merlinDAwizard 1 | 9
5 Apr 2009 #214
hi, i'm a british male who emigrated permanently to south east poland. i came to live in poland with my girlfriend who is polish, after we met in london, and we intend to get married this summer.

i came online to find some information about other english people in poland, and i was very upset and shocked to find that the majority of articles are about how english people are coming to poland, getting too drunk, smashing the place up and being generally disrespectful to their hosts. i found that many poles are generalizing that english cannot take their drink, and should be banned from clubs and hotels.

i should explain an important point.
in england it is very unusual (apart from weddings and funerals) for english people to eat while they are drinking. when i first came to poland, i could hardly stand up after a few shots of vodka, mainly because i refused to eat. now, i eat and drink all night long with out any harm just a very mellow mood.

if english people could adopt the polish way of enjoying alcohol, then maybe the common problems of a friday and saturday night across the uk, could be avoided.

please, please, please do not generalize that english people are bad news. :)
Lir
5 Apr 2009 #215
please do not generalize that english people are bad news. :)

you do realise that the majority of members here are not Polish........lol
southern 75 | 7,096
5 Apr 2009 #216
now, i eat and drink all night long with out any harm just a very mellow mood.

English now start to realize what Slavs have known for centuries.
Bondi 4 | 142
26 Apr 2009 #217
Well, there's one thing about the night-life in England: most clubs close at 2am. No wonder why...

IMHO the underlying problem is not the alcohol, but the fact that the English youth (or, hmm, the youth in England) have no discipline. When they go out on the p*ss, they know neither God, nor human. They drink brainlessly... And they turn totally unpredictable, no matter their age, though. At home, I know "who to avoid, where to go" (generally the low-life type of people like gipsies and low-class pubs + all-too-popular clubs), but in England even the most harmless situation can end up awfully...
prince valerian
29 Apr 2009 #218
i feel so ashamed
i would love to have seen Gdansk, wandered in the Tatras, seen that strange light you see in a bohemian sunset. Heard the sexy accents and drank borscht of a summer supper on the beaches of Sopot. Viewed the endless enigma of the architecture and revelled in Gorrecci....but, as with the rest of Europe, it seems my 'fellow countrymen' got there first; i would'nt feel welcome as i hate the drunk brigade far more than any pole, and can well understand why poles would be at the very least noticably cautious were i to appear there. Might try Lake Baikal in Siberia instead where the degenerate scum of Americana have yet to manifest their disease
shicks - | 2
5 Nov 2009 #219
OK. Here goes.

I am Scottish and have been married to a Polish woman for 22 years. We've now decided to open a restaurant in Poland.

Question:-
Do the Polish have a problem with the Scotiish and in particular a Scot opening up a business in Poland insofar that my restaurant will employ local labour and pump money back in to the local economy. If YES speak up now and tell me why the Polish would have a problem with this.

This should be interesting. Light the blue touch paper, stand back and wait for the fun to begin :)
wildrover 98 | 4,451
5 Nov 2009 #220
I have lived in Poland for five years...never once have i experianced any hostility due to being English , and i doubt you will get any due to being Scottish , although they might find it harder to understand you if you have a strong accent...

If you are planning on starting a business here , you ought at least to visit the place , you will soon discover if its going to be a good idea ..or not...
Wroclaw Boy
5 Nov 2009 #221
Do the Polish have a problem with the Scotiish and in particular a Scot opening up a business in Poland

Not at all.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
5 Nov 2009 #222
I am Scottish and can say that I am well received by most here. The Scots and Poles have certain commonalities. There will always be those that don't accept you but they tend not to accept their own kind either.
time means 5 | 1,310
5 Nov 2009 #223
The Scots and Poles have certain commonalities

Like what?
Seanus 15 | 19,706
5 Nov 2009 #224
We both moan like beeatches. Um, we both know what oppression is from our history. We both like to drink. That kind of thing.
time means 5 | 1,310
5 Nov 2009 #225
we both know what oppression is from our history

I have heard that before actually but with the add on that the English are oppressors like the Germans. Congratulations by the way.
Torq
5 Nov 2009 #226
Do the Polish have a problem with the Scotiish

Well, it depends - with some we have a problem, with some we don't.
In order to determine which group you belong to - please answer the
questionnaire:

1. Would you rather write on a wall...

a) FTQ
b) FTP

2. Which colours do you prefer?

a) White and Green
b) Blue, White and Black

3. Which songs do you think are nicer?

a) The Fields of Athenry and Willie Malley
b) Follow Follow and Loyal and True

4. What is the name of Glasgow Rangers football stadium?

a) Castle Greyskull
b) Ibrox Stadium

5. Was prince William of Orange:

a) a paedophile and a syphilitic
b) great king, the hero of Battle of Boyne

If you chose the answer "a" for all of the above questions then you are the kind
of Scot we shall have absolutely no problem with. If you, however, chose "b"
for your answers then... ;-)
Seanus 15 | 19,706
5 Nov 2009 #227
Thanks, tm. I took the plunge at last but it's business as usual at work.
Wroclaw Boy
5 Nov 2009 #228
I had some dude stick his finger up to me once as i drove past in a UK reg car. Racial discrimination.

I took the plunge at last but it's business as usual at work.

So you tied the knot then Seanus? i didnt know about that before hand. How was the wedding?
wildrover 98 | 4,451
5 Nov 2009 #229
some dude stick his finger up to me once as i drove past in a UK reg car

It might have been that you were driving a nice car , and he didn,t like it...
Seanus 15 | 19,706
5 Nov 2009 #230
On my birthday, the 24th of October. I'm glad the ceremony was short :)

Some folk will do that. Pretty lame when you consider how the lives of Poles have been enhanced by the EU's principles such as free movement and the recognition of qualifications abroad.

You get nobs everywhere though. Just wait til you get your Porsche, WB. You'll be goin so fast that you won't see him stick anything up.
shicks - | 2
13 Nov 2009 #231
I have been back and forth between Poland and London for 22 years and speak Polish like a native now so I should be OK on the language front thanks.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
13 Nov 2009 #232
Like a native, aha, so it still needs some work then? ;) ;)

Excessive drinking was never my scene though we've all got a story or two. I've seen some people horribly off their faces and it's embarrassing.
mateinone 5 | 58
30 Nov 2009 #233
When I was in Krakow the guy who owned the hostel told us that he hates having English people there. He also told us that as long as we do not act like English guys on a party weekend that we would have a wonderful time... he was right, we did.
Steveramsfan 2 | 306
30 Nov 2009 #234
When I was in Krakow the guy who owned the hostel told us that he hates having English people there

I have heard these stories and it always seems to be Krakow. Krakow is seen as a stag party city thats cheaper than Prague. I am glad that these English people are not wanted and are banned.

Lets hope they stop going to Krakow and don't just move to the rest of Poland for stag parties.

I have only been drunk once in Poland, and that was at a friends BBQ in his garden. Homemade Vodka was lethal :)

Don't be a lout in Poland and you will have a great holiday in Poland.
MAGS1982
14 Feb 2010 #235
anyone visiting poland should be on their guard in my eyes. my friend was drugged in poland on his second pint. He woke up in a clinic strapped to bed with a gown on. no one the clinic told him how he got there, where he was. Nor did they allow him to make a call for assistance. he was moved from one room to another which only had a bed and no lighting. This was a very frightening experience for him and if it hadn't been for his work colleague phoning hospitals etc i dread to think what would happen. any wander people give the polish a hard time, if this is there way of treating visitors in their country then my advise is tell people not to go and for the way my friend was treated like an animal in the clinic and was left BLACK AND BLUE he doesn't remember anything apart from standing in the pub sipping his second pint. ANYONE THINKING OF VISITING POLAND SHOULD BE ON THEIR GUARD PURCHASE ONLY BOTTLED BEER ASKED FOR IT UNOPEND AND TAKE YOUR OWN BOTTLE OPENER. EITHER THAT OR KICK THEM OUT OF THE EU UNTIL THEY UNDERSTAND HUMAN RIGHTS IN THAT COUNTRY.
Trevek 26 | 1,702
14 Feb 2010 #236
Lets hope they stop going to Krakow and don't just move to the rest of Poland for stag parties.

Apparently they've moved to Riga, in Latvia.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,858
14 Feb 2010 #237
He woke up in a clinic strapped to bed with a gown on. no one the clinic told him how he got there, where he was.

In other words, he got ********, decided to do something typical British like running round naked or harrassing local girls, got nicked and taken to the drying out clinic and is blaming being drugged instead? Pretty poor excuse, if you ask me. Typical though - Brits are usually ashamed of what they've done and blame someone else rather than admitting responsibility.

Is it so hard to understand that if you act like a drunken twat in Poland, you're going to be punished?

EITHER THAT OR KICK THEM OUT OF THE EU UNTIL THEY UNDERSTAND HUMAN RIGHTS IN THAT COUNTRY.

Like in the UK, where the police shoot you dead on tube trains even though you're innocent? Or what about the way that the police will happily beat you at demonstrations? And let's not forget that the UK is far, far worse than Poland when it comes to people being drugged in clubs.

Apparently they've moved to Riga, in Latvia.

Not wanted there either - I saw an interview with someone in their council who was saying that they would rather do without the money from Brits!
convex 20 | 3,978
14 Feb 2010 #238
This was a very frightening experience for him and if it hadn't been for his work colleague phoning hospitals etc i dread to think what would happen

I'm guessing organs would have been harvested. Good thing they found him.

I have heard these stories and it always seems to be Krakow. Krakow is seen as a stag party city thats cheaper than Prague. I am glad that these English people are not wanted and are banned.

Prague got too expensive for them, and the city just ended up getting fed up. The majority of the clubs and bars in the old town stopped allowing stag groups to even enter. Big signs on the doors, and big coal miner type guys to make sure they were followed.
delphiandomine 88 | 18,858
14 Feb 2010 #239
I'm guessing organs would have been harvested. Good thing they found him.

Pickled liver : 10zl?
gumishu 11 | 5,603
14 Feb 2010 #240
This was a very frightening experience for him and if it hadn't been for his work colleague phoning hospitals etc i dread to think what would happen

I'm guessing organs would have been harvested. Good thing they found him.

it's not the thing - the thing is called 'izba wytrzeźwień' ('sobering clinic') -most of these have gone but some cities kept them - I think Kraków is one of these


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