The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / UK, Ireland  % width posts: 310

The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland


Teffle 22 | 1,321
11 Oct 2010 #1
For me it was:

Showering in the evening. For me & almost everyone I know, a morning shower is the norm.
I was told that I shower "The French way"

Breakfast as a "proper meal" - ham, gherkins, onions etc etc. I mean it's nice generally but not at that time of the morning - not for me anyway.

Removing shoes when entering houses. This was odd for me.
richasis 1 | 420
11 Oct 2010 #2
It's a lot like Korea - thanks for bringing back the pleasant memories.

:)
Wroclaw Boy
11 Oct 2010 #3
After a night on the booze its no big deal to start drinking again the very next morning, it begins with a hair of the dog.

gherkins, onions

You had that for breakfast? no wonder you didnt like Polish food.
OP Teffle 22 | 1,321
11 Oct 2010 #4
But I did ! - sort of. Some of it anyway.

So this kind of breakfast isn't usual then? This is what I was offered in the three houses I stayed in anyway.
Wroclaw 44 | 5,387
11 Oct 2010 #5
So this kind of breakfast isn't usual then?

you wouldn't get it in this house. not for first or second breakfast.
Bzibzioh
11 Oct 2010 #6
Some years ago I shared apartment with the one young British couple. They had a habit of sleeping naked with their bedroom door open, and they'd sleep until noon. This was very unusual for me, just too much information. Thank g-d, it was only for a week.
OP Teffle 22 | 1,321
11 Oct 2010 #7
They had a habit of sleeping naked with their bedroom door open,

Well that part would be normal for me.

Although the bed is positioned so that you would need to look in and round the corner to see anything.
convex 20 | 3,978
11 Oct 2010 #8
Well that part would be normal for me.

You sleep with your door open? That would freak me out, but I am a bit paranoid..
Bzibzioh
11 Oct 2010 #9
Well that part would be normal for me.

It was anything but normal for me. When you have company CLOSE YOUR FREAKIN' DOOR.
OP Teffle 22 | 1,321
11 Oct 2010 #10
Well if you can easily see in, yes of course. If not, I don't think it matters really.

Another difference for me by the way was beer (lager) not being served cold. Coolish to lukewarm was my experience. At first I thought it was a mistake but it appeared to be the norm.
mafketis 23 | 8,543
11 Oct 2010 #11
Pickels and onions don't sound typical for breakfast. Fresh tomatoes, yes.

Traditional Polish (big) breakfast is usually (IME) bread and/or rolls with cold cuts and cheese (yellow and white crumbly). Maybe fresh tomatoes. Everybody makes their own sandwiches.

Not much cooking beyond eggs (esp scrambled and boiled or my favorite, soft boiled eggs with fresh horseradish and mayonaise) maybe boiled frankfurters and milk soup (somthing like very runny oatmeal but maybe barley or rice instead of oats).

British abominations like fried tomatoes and beans are kept well away from the breakfast table.
Wroclaw Boy
11 Oct 2010 #12
Occasionally you may see a gherkin accompanied with cold sliced meats and cheese but onions nah.

fried tomatoes

After a while you learn to kill that tomato with your buttered toast. English breakfasts are legendary.
mafketis 23 | 8,543
11 Oct 2010 #13
Like many other plagues.
McCoy 27 | 1,275
11 Oct 2010 #14
Showering in the evening. For me & almost everyone I know, a morning shower is the norm.

yeap and hows with that in Ireland/Britain?

Breakfast - onions

you dont get too many kisses i assume
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Oct 2010 #15
It's been mentioned elsewhere but handing across change is different here. You are supposed to place it on the counter for them to pick up but it can take a while to pick all the coins off of it.
rychlik 41 | 373
11 Oct 2010 #16
Some years ago I shared apartment with the one young British couple. They had a habit of sleeping naked with their bedroom door open, and they'd sleep until noon. This was very unusual for me, just too much information. Thank g-d, it was only for a week.

F'ucking weirdos. I hear Austrians are similar.
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
11 Oct 2010 #17
Removing shoes when entering houses. This was odd for me.

I like this one a lot, why bring outside filth inside?

A few things it took me a while to get used to are:

- Strangers staring at you all the time.

- People go to work much earlier and go home earlier.

- Toilets that you can see your poop, although I did see them in Lithuania and the Netherlands too.

- Buying things in a shop by weight, like clothes.

- Shaking everyone's hands all the time, when we meet and when we part (except over thresholds???)

- Chimney men dressed in Black, with the hat.

- Driving on the wrong side of the road ;p (I am well used to it by now)

- Although I find Polish very similar to Irish in mentality, sensibilities and humour, I find it harder to "crack their shell" and get to know people here. I am not saying they aren't friendly but, especially initially, much more standoffish.

- The extreme weather (comparatively speaking) it is like a several different countries depending on what time of year you are here. Plus 35 to Minus 35.

- The sour foods.

- The fireplaces with the glass on them (not open).

I could go on all day.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
11 Oct 2010 #18
Taking shoes off is more an eastern thing (MUST in Japan) but we follow it in Scotland in many households.

The aloofness can be noticed but breaking their guard is not that difficult.
jwojcie 2 | 763
11 Oct 2010 #19
Some years ago I shared apartment with the one young British couple. They had a habit of sleeping naked with their bedroom door open, and they'd sleep until noon. This was very unusual for me, just too much information. Thank g-d, it was only for a week.

Well, maybe it was invitation not only information ;-)

Shaking everyone's hands all the time, when we meet and when we part(except over thresholds???)

If I remember correctly this habit of not shaking hands over thresholds is based on ancient tradtion of Slavs to burry some dead ones below threshold... So, you shouldn't shake hands over them for some reason, bad luck I suppose ;)

PS. actually I decided to check it and I learn some weird stuff..
For example pre-Christian Slavs burried below threshold dead children (from miscarriage for example) to have some presumably good (?) home deamon. They believed that children had accumulated a lot of life energy ergo dead ones suppose to be powerful friendly deamons.

Weird stuff, isn't it ? SeanBM, remember DON'T shake hands over home deamons ! ;)
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
11 Oct 2010 #20
ancient tradtion of Slavs to burry some deadones below threshold

Ah, that explains it, wiat a sec... what???

:)
businessmaninpl 6 | 26
11 Oct 2010 #21
Strangers staring at you all the time.

This is by far the worst thing in poland. Why do people keep staring? I constantly find myself looking in the mirror to see if there is something on my face. I can't think of any other country in europe that i've been to where people stare.

footwear

Another thing i can't understand - outdoor shoes indoors - mind blowing!!
grubas 12 | 1,391
11 Oct 2010 #22
This is by far the worst thing in poland. Why do people keep staring?

Some of you foraigners are simply oversensitive p u s s i e s.What is your problem?They stare?Then stare back.I like when women stare at me it gives opportunity to walk up to them.And if guys stare I stare back.But see I am not a p u s s y.
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
11 Oct 2010 #23
Showering in the evening

Wash the grime of the day off..rather than sleep in..Always been an evening and morning showerer...But I will concede an old house mate of mine used to the morning thing until I called her a skank for doing so..

Removing shoes when entering houses. This was odd for me.

There are plenty in the UK that practice this - what's odd about not walking muck into someones home?

gherkins,

Got the mini ones in the fridge, but I would consider eating them for breakfast (yuk!)

British abominations like fried tomatoes and beans

Yummy (grilled tomatoes are better though)

yeap and hows with that in Ireland/Britain?

Its not the norm..its all about preference..As kids its routine with the whole bath and bed thing..some of us continue with it..(a lot do actually)

They had a habit of sleeping naked with their bedroom door open

Exhibitionist?

Why do people keep staring?

I cant say I noticed this on any of my visits..but then again you must be stairing at them in return?
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
12 Oct 2010 #24
Bzibzioh:
They had a habit of sleeping naked with their bedroom door open

English like to shock. Especially people who they perceive to be overly sensitive.

Wash the grime of the day off..rather than sleep in..Always been an evening and morning showerer...But I will concede an old house mate of mine used to the morning thing until I called her a skank for doing so..

Now wait, if your mate showers in the morning and you shower in the evening...perfection!
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
12 Oct 2010 #25
I still take a shover the Canadian way- in the morning.
I don't mind people staring and I really don't find them staring - simply looking.
Men look at women without being sleezy , which I find nice for a change.

They stare?Then stare back.I like when women stare at me it gives opportunity to walk up to them.

I agree. The first contact can be initiated and it is not polite to look away in Poland. People think that one is up to something.
OP Teffle 22 | 1,321
12 Oct 2010 #26
yeap and hows with that in Ireland/Britain?

What do you mean?

Wash the grime of the day off..rather than sleep in..

What 'grime' is going to get attached to e.g. your knees or back? Your hands and face can be washed whenever.

Depends what way you look at it. For me, showering in the morning has the added benefit of helping you wake up. Also, morning showerers are basically cleaner than all the evening showerers they meet during the day and early evening ; )

Also, it has to be said, assuming most people have sex at night a morning shower makes more sense in many ways.

Anyway, you really think it's not the norm to shower in the morning in the UK? Like I said, I lived there and every single personI encountered did this.

There are plenty in the UK that practice this - what's odd about not walking muck into someones home?

Plenty? really? Maybe some, but I lived in England for four years and never came across it.

I just think it's a bit much - you just make sure you wipe your feet properly, end of. Dogs (who have a lot worse on their paws than the average human shoe I'm sure) can run around peoples houses without wearing little pet slippers so what's the big deal? What's so important about your house - you have a hoover. That's how I feel about it anyway.
zetigrek
12 Oct 2010 #27
Removing shoes when entering houses. This was odd for me.

actually it's rude to demand from your guest to remove shoes. Removing shoes has practical reasons as its to keep out dirt from your house. Many people if they are not in formal visit they remove their shoes volontary as they thinks it's polite.
Olaf 6 | 956
12 Oct 2010 #28
What about covering all windows when it gets a bit darker, starting early in the evening. For my surprise I usually got answers like: I don't want people looking while I'm eating, sittin, watching tv, washing dishes, doing nothing.

Isn't it weird? Living on 2nd floor or higher what do I care? Sure I rather don't parade naked (rather) in the apartment but covering all the blinds etc makes you loos all the panorama of the city outside...
OP Teffle 22 | 1,321
12 Oct 2010 #29
What about covering all windows when it gets a bit darker,

Are you saying that this is common in Ireland & Britain but not in Poland?

I think it's normal anyway - what are curtains for then? : )
zetigrek
12 Oct 2010 #30
I think it's normal anyway - what are curtains for then? : )

to cover your windows when in early mornings summer sun pops into your bed. When you watching tv and sunshines are mirroring in your tv screen.

So curtains are useful only when you have windows facing west or east ;)

Teffle what about two taps? Have you got used to use one?


Home / UK, Ireland / The more subtle differences: Ireland/Britain v Poland
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.