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What is funny about this picture?


rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
23 Sep 2016  #1
apparently this an anti immigration poster - a safe future for our children..

but what are they running away from? LOL



Lyzko 20 | 6,340
24 Sep 2016  #2
Obviously from their own fears:-)
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
24 Sep 2016  #3
this is an anti immigration poster, promising a 'safe future for our children'....
why are they running away so fast ? LOL

:) Lyzko....look harder...
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
24 Sep 2016  #4
I am and I did and I stand by my post!
Wulkan - | 3,255
24 Sep 2016  #5
Lyzko....look harder...

I think you demand too much from the halfwit.

but what are they running away from?

Too me it looks like a priest, kind of weird I must admit. Looks more like anti-catholic poster rather than anti-immigrants.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
24 Sep 2016  #6
Could be a nun with her habit in her hand, I would run too if a nun started chasing me.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,467
24 Sep 2016  #7
nun

Looks more like a priest rather than a nun. Reckon we're all creatures of our subjective impressions and habits. After 11 years in nun-run schools and 4 years under the Christian Brothers, I have nothing but admiration for the men and ladies of the cloth. Besdes teaching subjects, they instilled disclipline and the importance of sacrifice and self-mortification which toughen people up for life. It was the permissive Dr Spock style upbringing that created several generations of mamby-pamby, ego-tripping misfits.
johnny reb 16 | 3,470
24 Sep 2016  #8
I would run too if a nun started chasing me.

God knows I would. lol
I have had many nightmare flash backs of it.

they instilled disclipline and the importance of sacrifice and self-mortification which toughen people up for life.

They instilled fear, hate, despondency, guilt, untruths, and were total control freaks which did toughen me up not to ever take s hit from anyone in life again.

They destroyed a kind peaceful little boy and turned him into a monster.
It was a living nightmare that scarred me for life.
Took me along time to forgive them.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
24 Sep 2016  #9
"mamby-pamby,"

No if nothing the brutality of some of my educators taught me that I could ultimately get anything I wanted if I used violence or the threat of it, well into my early teens, luckily I found a mentor that helped me, and put me onto the correct path in a non denominational school, later and as I got wiser I understood that I may have fallen foul of a few "Bad ones" , I still remain a Catholic and have mostly overcome my prejudice against and fear of of the lady's of the cloth.
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
24 Sep 2016  #10
I have a friend (well , had, he is dead now) who was so terrorised and traumatised as a small child in a home run by nuns that the Irish Government gave him a massive payout. He had a few good years from it, at least. I think he would have preferred something a bit more 'mamby pamby' at the age of 4.

For example the little children had to sleep with their hands outside the covers, in a very cold dorm.
in the night, their hands would go between their thighs, for warmth. the nuns would rip the covers off and whack them with a cane.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
24 Sep 2016  #11
And they used to spend two hours standing over me (While I gagged) until i finished the cheese pie that was forced onto me for school dinner, funny thing I like cheese pie these days, Roz that picture of yours is certainly bringing up some old demons, not blaming you BTW.
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
24 Sep 2016  #12
oh dear I am sorry Dolno...I really did not mean to upset anyone, it was like a joke.....'keeping our children safe' and a priest chasing them....
Ironside 47 | 9,574
24 Sep 2016  #13
Looks more like anti-catholic poster rather than anti-immigrants.

Indeed, that looks quite out of place and to be honest look weird. I suspect that that is what it is anti-Catholic propaganda poster pretending to be something that is not. Nowadays, you can create that kind of thingee on your PC, take a picture from one source, replace original message with something entirely else and vole!
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,467
24 Sep 2016  #14
fear of of the lady's of the cloth

I'm wondering if this may not be the case of traditional Catholic discipline clashing with more permissively raised baby-boomers who couldn't take it. The pre-baby-boom generation did not judge the Catholic school as harshly as is being done on here. Baby-boomers are said to be those born after 1946.
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
24 Sep 2016  #15
"traditional Catholic discipline clashing with more permissively raised baby-boomers who couldn't take it."

Well I was born after 1946, to two VERY traditional Polish parents, (Soldier Polish II corps, mother survivor of soviet gulag) I can guarantee there was nothing permissive when it came to my upbringing.

Don't worry I can take it , I did take it at the time , I can also deal with business today if needs be. All I'm saying is I could have done without the hassle at a time when education should have been the primary objective in those formative years, maybe in the USA catholic education was a tad bit softer than in Europe, after all there is a bill of rights in the US.
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
24 Sep 2016  #16
I suspect that that is what it is anti-Catholic propaganda poster pretending to be something that is not

no its a Ruch Narodowny Poster. I think it is supposed to depict the priest watching the children in a caring way. It just amused me that is all.
johnny reb 16 | 3,470
25 Sep 2016  #17
. The pre-baby-boom generation did not judge the Catholic school as harshly as is being done on here.

That just shows you how brainwashed they had you back then Pol.
You have lived with it your entire life.
What is so 'harshly' about sharing our horror stories and abuse of our Catholic education ?
I am sure it happened prior 1946 also as that is how "they" controlled the people of the Church back then is with fear, embarrassment and guilt.

In first grade when a six year old wet their pants the Nun would hang them over the radiator to stink up the classroom as they dried to instill embarrassment in the child until the poor little buttons cried and no longer wanted to come to school.

And that big stiff pointer that was used as a switch to instill fear.
Or posting in the Church bulletin every year how much each member donated in their Church envelope over the course of the year to instill guilt and embarrassment.

I think we should go on sharing these vicious barbaric tactics used back then by the Church that are no longer tolerated by the parishes.

It is good therapy to get it out and laugh about the abuse we took because we were so brainwashed that we thought it was normal and acceptable.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,467
25 Sep 2016  #18
about the abuse

Nobody ever thought or spoke of abuse back then -- that is a modern concept where anything from a harsh word to a sour facial grimace can be called a form of abuse. The bottom line (and this pertains to all schools, not just denominational ones), if a parent got called to school over their child's unacceptable behaviour or poor grades, the parents and teacher worked as a team ot set the kid straight, and punishment usually extended to the home where the child may have been grounded or had his pocket money withdrawn for a time.

Later, when parents were called to school, they often confronted and questioned the teacher, siding with the spoilt brat. Some call that an attempt to win the confidence of the child by parents who may ply him with gifts but devote very little time or themselves to the progeny.
Chemikiem 5 | 1,596
25 Sep 2016  #19
that is a modern concept where anything from a harsh word to a sour facial grimace can be called a form of abuse.

Except that posters here are telling you that they suffered abuse at the hands of the nuns, and that wasn't confined to harsh words or grimaces was it?

Just because you didn't have those experiences, doesn't mean that it didn't happen to others.
Abuse is hardly a modern concept either.
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
25 Sep 2016  #20
modern concept where anything from a harsh word to a sour facial grimace can be called a form of abuse

Was what happened to my friend 'a sour facial grimace'? NO. And that is why the Irish government were paying out. Perhaps what you mean is that it is a 'modern concept' to talk about it, to label it, but I can assure you it has been going on for a long long time.

Maybe your catholic school was 'mamby pamby' in which case you were lucky really werent you?
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
25 Sep 2016  #21
Having your left hand tied behind your back with your own tie in class , then running the gauntlet of abuse from fellow classmates at playtime (Because of being different), while the nuns stand by and do nothing to stop the bullying .

"Nobody ever thought or spoke of abuse back then "

No and I didn't speak because I was told that writing with my left hand was wrong and my parents would not be happy that I disobeyed my teachers.

And do you know what, I believe my parents would have sided with the nuns, as no one from the church could ever do wrong in their eyes.
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
25 Sep 2016  #22
Dolno, how horrible and how damaging.
That is abuse, no two ways round it
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
25 Sep 2016  #23
"That is abuse, no two ways round it"

True but I never use it as an excuse in life, or have I let it get to me in later years, I was luckk there is much worse that can befall a child in this world , must admit it has been good to be able to discuss it here on this thread, I have found quite cathartic, It has also been interesting to read johnny reb 's story, thanks for your kind and supportive words roz.
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,467
25 Sep 2016  #24
bullying

Isn't bullying the traditional British way of things. TheBritish boarding school was/is a bastion thereof. At least, that's what Churchill claimed.
Wulkan - | 3,255
25 Sep 2016  #25
Isn't bullying the traditional British way of things. TheBritish boarding school was/is a bastion thereof.

They are notorious indeed, look at what it did to Harry, I often tease him for that but at the end of the day it's not a laughing matter :-/
OP rozumiemnic 8 | 3,725
25 Sep 2016  #26
Isn't bullying the traditional British way of things.

only for the upper classes...:D
dolnoslask 5 | 2,462
25 Sep 2016  #27
"Isn't bullying the traditional British way of things."

Well you might have a point there, quite common forty years ago, not sure about today, as for boarding school my parents were too skint to afford it.
Joker 1 | 834
1 Mar 2017  #28
"Isn't bullying the traditional British way of things."

Its common practice for the British to gang up bully people on this forum.

One can assume this is how they behave in their natural habitat.
Lyzko 20 | 6,340
1 Mar 2017  #29
It used to be called "fagging", as in Tom Brown's Schooldays:-) The Germans use a made-up. pseudo-"Denglisch" word for it; they call it "Mobbing", and it's equally unpleasant, trust me.
Slavictor 9 | 201
23 Mar 2018  #30
Merged:

Do you enjoy arguing?



Then this is for you.





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