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Funny Polish surnames


Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
15 Jun 2010 #1
The following are all currently used in Poland, usually by only a handful of Poles, but Fiut has several thousand users. Know any others that might evoke a chuckle?

Dupiński
Fiut
Fiutek
Pierdoła
Sral
Hujek
Kapusta 2 | 66
19 Jun 2010 #2
Funny. I know someone with surname: Gadzinka.
MareGaea 29 | 2,752
19 Jun 2010 #3
Rynkidynki?

>^..^<

M-G (just guessing)
mido_int - | 5
19 Jun 2010 #4
What "Gadzinka" mean in Polish?
Kapusta 2 | 66
19 Jun 2010 #5
Gadzinka - "a little reptile"
Allison 5 | 118
20 Jun 2010 #6
I know a funny Jewish name. Anne Recksiek haha. There aren't that many funny Polish names, I don't see why people think they are funnier than any other names.
Allison 5 | 118
20 Jun 2010 #8
That sounds Jewish to me.
plk123 8 | 4,150
20 Jun 2010 #9
huh? must be the blond in you. ;) :D
Allison 5 | 118
20 Jun 2010 #11
huh? must be the blond in you. ;) :D

What does that have to do with anything? Don't judge someone by the color of their hair haha. I typed it in google to find its meaning and all this Jewish stuff came up haha.
plk123 8 | 4,150
20 Jun 2010 #12
that still makes no sense, blondie.. there is no "ą" in jewish language.. besides you must have some fvcked up google as i didn't find one reference to jewish anything when i did google.. hmm
Miguel Colombia - | 351
20 Jun 2010 #13
The both of you are clearly struggling with your mental impairments. Glab is a word in Yiddish and means "believe".

It could also be the name Gleb...

And there is no such thing as a Jewish language, PLK. Or is there a Christian/Muslim tongue you'd like to teach us about?
plk123 8 | 4,150
20 Jun 2010 #14
so the jews speak polish then? is that right?
yehudi 1 | 432
20 Jun 2010 #15
And there is no such thing as a Jewish language,

Excuse me? Hebrew is not a Jewish language?
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
20 Jun 2010 #16
Naturally, nearly all animals, plants and tools are used as surnames. Some might be amused by Baran (ram= stuborn or stupid), Koza (goat), Kura (hen), Kaczka (duck),

Ryba (fish), Karp (carp), Leszcz (bream), Okoń (perch), also Kutas (tassle but colloquially also penis), Maślanka (buttermilk) Mierzwa (manure), Kałuża (mud puddle), etc. Oh yes, there is also Żydek (little Jew, Jew boy).
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
20 Jun 2010 #17
In my primary school I had a Sobota (saturday) in my class. There was also a Piątek (friday) in one grade higher. My dad has a copy of an old German map showing our village in great detail, and one of the farms was belonging to a Pierdolla (pierdoła means something like old fart or a clumsy and helpless person). There is also Niesłony (not-salty-one).
asik 2 | 220
20 Jun 2010 #18
The both of you are clearly struggling with your mental impairments

Why are you here ??
It's all about Poland and people involved with Poland. Who are you to judge Polish people?? Can't you find yourself better and more nicer jewish site???

Try harder!!

Naturally, nearly all animals, plants and tools are used as surnames.

There is a Polish regulation which states , if a name is kind of insulting then a person have a right to change the name in accordance to the Polish Law.

I personaly have met people with surnames as:

Mrs Cipa and family ! (Mrs ****coount)
Mr Kutasewicz and family! (Mr Cock)
Mr Hujewicz and family! (Mr Prick)

Who are these people? They don't want to change their surnames!!! What thaaa!
Miguel Colombia - | 351
20 Jun 2010 #20
so the jews speak polish then? is that right?

There were of course, Jews that spoke Polish, as there are Jews that speak Spanish or English or Italian.

Excuse me? Hebrew is not a Jewish language?

Is Arabic a muslim/christian language?
asik 2 | 220
20 Jun 2010 #21
Pielucha

My husband's neighbour in Poland was Mr Pielucha (Mr Nappy) and his (the neighbour) family was of German origin
zetigrek
20 Jun 2010 #22
Maciej Dokurwo, Marek Porąbaniec, Katarzyna Paskuda, Agnieszka Szpara, Sławomir Ocipka, Zdzisław Lachman, Bożena Rżąca, Agata Biały Polak, Roman Jebut, Andrzej Nieruchaj...

Nieruchaj is a winner in this competition!

justysiaq.wrzuta.pl/obraz/powieksz/7Mg9ZyWwFKo

Hujek

According to moikrewni.pl there is only one person left with that surname: moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/hujek.html

Wonder why... ;D
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
20 Jun 2010 #23
Calls to mind an old anecdote (told to me by a Ukrainian) about an international conference whose paritcipants included Don Juan Jebaj Alerano from Spain, the Chinese representative Wsuń Chuj w Czaj and Stanisław w D*pę Pie*dolski z Polski.
asik 2 | 220
20 Jun 2010 #24
conference whose paritcipants included Don Juan Jebaj Alerano from Spain, the Chinese representative Wsuń Chuj w Czaj and Stanisław w D*pę Pie*dolski z Polski.

hahahahha!!!

My first English teacher in Australia was Mr La_huj ( Vetnamese origin) and he knew there is some secret about his surname and the Polish meaning:)

PS: huj /chuj - prick/dick
z_darius 14 | 3,969
20 Jun 2010 #25
Psica
Dubska (pronounced dupska)
lekrs - | 2
20 Jun 2010 #26
Anne Recksiek
Allison 5 | 118
20 Jun 2010 #27
I already posted that and its Jewish not Polish. Could you imagine somebody having that name and it being called out in school. "Anne Recksiek you're late" that would be hysterical.

that still makes no sense, blondie.. there is no "ą" in jewish language.. besides you must have some fvcked up google as i didn't find one reference to jewish anything when i did google.. hmm

The both of you are clearly struggling with your mental impairments. Glab is a word in Yiddish and means "believe".

It could also be the name Gleb...

And there is no such thing as a Jewish language, PLK. Or is there a Christian/Muslim tongue you'd like to teach us about?

Seems I have a good sense for things. I just thought that sounded like a Jewish name for some reason it didn't sound Polish at all. I always have a knack for detecting these things. There was a guy whom people thought was pure German on a forum but there was something very odd about him, he didn't seem like it at all. He said something that sounded very peculier for a German and I thought he sounded like a Gypsy so I asked him if he was a gypsy and he wouldn't admit to it. But later I found out he had told everyone that he was 1/4 Gypsy on another forum but they had found out that he was actually a foreigner in Germany because his German language skills were very average. They knew for sure for other reasons, but I don't remember what they were exactly. Everyone else on that forum thought I was crazy for thinking he was a gypsy, but I turned out to be right.
vetala - | 382
20 Jun 2010 #28
Seems I have a good sense for things. I just thought that sounded like a Jewish name for some reason it didn't sound Polish at all.

Seems like you don't. Głąb is a regular Polish word meaning cabbage or, colloqually, an idiot.
1jola 14 | 1,879
20 Jun 2010 #29
that still makes no sense, blondie.. there is no "ą" in jewish language.. besides you must have some fvcked up google as i didn't find one reference to jewish anything when i did google.. hmm

She has Joogle, and you don't. They don't issue that just to anybody. Shalom, Allison.
southern 75 | 7,096
20 Jun 2010 #30
about an international conference whose paritcipants included Don Juan Jebaj Alerano from Spain, the Chinese representative Wsuń Chuj w Czaj and Stanisław w D*pę Pie*dolski z Polski.

We had the same joke in Greece about the russian singer Maria Putanevska,the greek-american businessman John Mastakounas(this means you move our d1cks),the japanese cook chyno taka taka(this means spill very fast),the russian composer Ivan Vromokolarov(this means dirty ass),the japanese ambassador sougamotosoj(this means fucck your clan),the spanish dancer Maria de la poutza(this means Maria the d1ck) etc.


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