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Chechen Congress in Poland, Russia frowns


Seanus 15 | 19,706
19 Sep 2010 #61
We didn't launch a second war on them, CK, Putin did. You couldn't accept the first loss given the strategic importance of Chechnya, Dagestan and Ingusetia to you. CK, why did the Chechens fight so ferociously?

Bere who?
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259
19 Sep 2010 #62
We didn't launch a second war on them, CK, Putin did.

Nonsense. Bereza launched it.

why did the Chechens fight so ferociously

It is simple. They just cannot perceive civilization, but we ought to teach them even against their will.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
19 Sep 2010 #63
Who is Bereza?

No, that wasn't the reason and you know it.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
19 Sep 2010 #65
That tells me nothing, really. What did he do?
joepilsudski 26 | 1,389
21 Sep 2010 #66
Why not Chechen Congress meet in Grozny?

Nonsense. Bereza launched it.

Yes, correct.
Marek11111 9 | 816
21 Sep 2010 #67
I do not see why Russians just bomb the building and blame on Al-Qaeda or just create a new like “ Russians for word dominance “ organization and list it as terrorist organization as neo nazi blame them for killing the Chechen Congress in Poland, then promises to fight terrorist home and abroad, and who in the world will object to fighting terror.
Sasha 2 | 1,083
21 Sep 2010 #68
I do not see why Russians just bomb the building

Witnessed that? Come to Russia and testify in court... we'll imprison these bastards! The Russian people will owe you.
ConstantineK 26 | 1,259
21 Sep 2010 #69
Though I would like to see those times when all Chechen bandits will choose Poland as their lawful territory, how Poles will appeal to Russia demanding rescue. That would be fun, really.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
21 Sep 2010 #70
GROM would wipe the floor with them. The Polish police are hard nuts too and wouldn't hesitate to deal them their fate. Anyway, that's academic as Poland has done them no wrong.
OP pawian 173 | 12,541
4 Aug 2012 #71
It seems Chechenya was pacified. Nothing in the news, except for sporadic reports about minor clashes in the mountains.
But the ferment is brewing and will again explode one day or another.
Sasha 2 | 1,083
10 Aug 2012 #72
But the ferment is brewing and will again explode one day or another.

It does explode occassionally. The Russians simply don't consider them Russian and that says it all.
The government cared to invest into military annexation but it didn't spend a copeck on bringing their cultural level up.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
10 Aug 2012 #73
It seems Chechenya was pacified. Nothing in the news, except for sporadic reports about minor clashes in the mountains.
But the ferment is brewing and will again explode one day or another.

This situation has continued in this cyclical way for so many decades. When one reads Tolstoy's tale Hadji Murad, and compares it to the situation today, one is amazed at how little has changed in the last two centuries.
OP pawian 173 | 12,541
10 Aug 2012 #74
It does explode occassionally.

Yes, there was a suicidal attack a few days ago.

pl.euronews.com/2012/08/06/zamach-w-czeczenii/

The Russians simply don't consider them Russian and that says it all.

But Chechens don`t want to be considered Russians.

he government cared to invest into military annexation but it didn't spend a copeck on bringing their cultural level up.

Well, the destroyed city of Grozny has been rebuilt. It cost Russia a few billions of dollars, half embezzled by Russian generals and local Chechen collaborators. :):):)

This situation has continued in this cyclical way for so many decades. When one reads Tolstoy's tale Hadji Murad, and compares it to the situation today, one is amazed at how little has changed in the last two centuries.

Exactly.
Sasha 2 | 1,083
13 Aug 2012 #75
But Chechens don`t want to be considered Russians.

True, unless money talks like they do in say the US.
Anyway, I rather meant their cultural conditions.

When one reads Tolstoy's tale Hadji Murad, and compares it to the situation today, one is amazed at how little has changed in the last two centuries.

One may as well read Lermontov on the issue. Indeed it will never change. The Russians are badly lacking entrepreneural spirit to turn them into what the Hispanics are in the US.

P.S. It's nice to see people who still read classical literature.


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