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20% of adult Poles are single and live with Mummy!


zetigrek
3 Dec 2010 #211
as for my husband, I'm not going to write a book.

Is Havok your husband? Sorry I've lost the point...

medlunek?

pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adres_zameldowania
trener zolwia 1 | 939
3 Dec 2010 #212
I've always voted Democrat.

Then you've been voting wrong. You don't sound like a Dem. It's the Dems who are all about whining and casting blame; it's the Repubs that are all about personal responsiblity.

jobs are occupied by job migrants

Then I would say you guys need to reform your immigration laws. But then the whole EU thing... Gotta hate how that murdered nations sovereignty and their ability to control their own destiny and safeguard their own peeps...

a duty of children to take care of them and sending them to some specilized homes of care (I don't know how do you call it in english) is considered as something terribly wrong and the elders feel often grudges that family not wish to take care of them personally.

Nursing homes/ old folks homes. Same thing here.

On a side note, how can 20% of adult Poles live at home when they're all working overseas? I wonder if they statistically live at home, but actually work abroad.

Side note, shiite. I suspect this is key to the title and theme of this thread. Good catch.
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
3 Dec 2010 #213
It's the Dems who are all about whining and casting blame; it's the Repubs that are all about personal responsiblity.

that's grossly over-generalized. it's also a topic for another discussion, one that has been taking place in this country for decades, and we're not going to be able to say anything new on this forum.

the link about meldunek is in Polish.

maybe I missed it, but is there an identified source of the statement that 20% of adult Poles live with their parents? did they mention the age bracket, or any other details? I'm curious because I can't figure out if it's true or not, actually.
jonni 16 | 2,485
3 Dec 2010 #214
the link about meldunek is in Polish.

maybe I missed it, but is there an identified source of the statement that 20% of adult Poles live with their parents? did they mention the age bracket, or any other details? I'm curious because I can't figure out if it's true or not, actually.

Meldunek is about Poles having to have a registered address.
A typical dialogue:
Pole: Where do you live?
Expat: In Warsaw,
Pole: But Where do you actually live?
Expat: In Mokotow,
Pole: But where do you really live?
Expat: on Ulica Belwederska, opposite the Hyatt,
Pole: But really live, where your parents live?
Expat: I haven't lived there for twenty years,
Pole: But you're registered there?,
Expat: What?

The meldunek thing was used in Poland during communist times, and they forgot to get rid of it after the Wall came down. In Russia, it was used to control who could live in big cities. In Poland, the government were supposed to get rid of it last year but didn't. Some ex-communist countries stopped it long ago.

The 20% thing is about what address someone is registered at. So it's very possible that a person from Poland can actually live in England but still be registered with family in Poland.
convex 20 | 3,978
3 Dec 2010 #215
The meldunek thing was used in Poland during communist times, and they forgot to get rid of it after the Wall came down. In Russia, it was used to control who could live in big cities. In Poland, the government were supposed to get rid of it last year but didn't. Some ex-communist countries stopped it long ago.

Most other European countries also require registration.
zetigrek
3 Dec 2010 #216
maybe I missed it,

here are some statistics:

Z danych Eurostatu wynika, że w grupie 25-34-latków 30 proc. kobiet i 44 proc. mężczyzn w Polsce mieszka wciąż z rodzicami. Unijna średnia to odpowiednio 20 i 32 proc.

But we are not the worst:

Natomiast na Słowacji, w Słowenii i Grecji z rodzicami mieszka wciąż 42-36 proc. kobiet w wieku 25-34 lata. Jeśli chodzi o mężczyzn, najczęściej w rodzinnym domu pozostają Bułgarzy, Słoweńcy, Grecy i Słowacy (61-56 proc.)

source: wyborcza.biz/biznes/1,100969,8489138,Mlodzi_Polacy_czesciej_mieszkaja_ z_rodzicami_niz_rowiesnicy.html

For age 18-24:

Young Poles are more likely to live under the same roof with their parents than their peers in other EU countries - according to the latest data from the EU's statistical office Eurostat. Most northerners are emancipated , least - Slovenes , Slovaks and Greeks .

Your husband will translate you ;)


...it seems that half of Europe are losers...
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
3 Dec 2010 #217
oh, I see.
it would still be interesting to read the whole article about the 20% of people living with their parents (and what is young? 20? 30?). particularly because of the other part of the statement, that 20% of young adults are single. does it mean that 80% are married? that would REALLY be shocking, imo.

there just isn't enough information to form an honest opinion.

Most other European countries also require registration.

I can understand how a communist country would like to track their population, but now I'm curious about the rest of Europe. is there a valid reason for doing it?

Z:
oh, I guess you finished your post before I finished mine.
thank you for the statistics, but it won't be a few hours till I'm able to ask my husband about it.
jonni 16 | 2,485
3 Dec 2010 #218
I can understand how a communist country would like to track their population, but now I'm curious about the rest of Europe. is there a valid reason for doing it?

A few ex-communist countries have stopped it, and Britain has never had it. Seems a lot of bureaucracy for not much effect.
zetigrek
3 Dec 2010 #219
does it mean that 80% are married?

no it means that 80% are in relationships.
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
3 Dec 2010 #220
not necessarily. it would have that meaning in the colloquial sense, but when it comes to a census or tax-related issues, single would mean unmarried, or a single head of household kind of thing, not whether they have boyfriends or girlfriends.

either way, 80% is very high, whether we're talking casual relationships or marriage. Does either of the articles actually say that?
zetigrek
3 Dec 2010 #221
either way, 80% is very high

high? are you sure?
jonni 16 | 2,485
3 Dec 2010 #222
Exactly - in most of the world this is very normal.
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
3 Dec 2010 #223
it's rather difficult to comment on something that hasn't been defined precisely, but let's say we're talking marriage. I think only 40 or 50% of adult people in the US are married. I'm sure it varies from country to country, but compared with the US, 80% is high, and therefore cannot be normal for most of the world. if anyone has statistics on what's typical in other countries, I could change my mind, I just don't know much about it.
zetigrek
3 Dec 2010 #224
ItsAllAboutME

I mean relationship. 80% of certainly are in some kind of relationship. I don't know what's marriage rate for Poland but I know that 30 % of marriages end up with divorce, additionally young Poles are not so willing to marry they prefer informal relationships.
ItsAllAboutME 3 | 270
3 Dec 2010 #225
well, yes, I understand this is what YOU mean, but the people who compiled those statistics had to have a definition of "single" in order to measure how many people out there are "single." I'm curious if either of those articles mentions their definition.

80% of people you happen to know might very well be in a relationship, but it's not a representative sample of the population.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
5 Dec 2010 #226
As I said it's easy to be independend in the USA. In Poland parents call you a sucker when you want to move out from home and lose your all savings on rental bills.

Housing may be more available in USA than Europe, but still not easy. You need to cut the umbilical cord, with ma and pa. Polish parents are tough all over, not just in Poland. They don't like giving up their babies.

i realize that the situation for young people in PL sucks, but the question is: how to change it?

Do what you did, move out. University housing? Move into apartment house in Poland? Or move out of Poland?

Let's face it, we all had to do it and it was never easy.
johnny reb 28 | 5,005
30 Jan 2020 #227
In Poland parents call you a sucker when you want to move out from home and lose your all savings on rental bills.

You need to cut the umbilical cord, with ma and pa. Polish parents are tough. They don't like giving up their babies

And ten years later we call them Snowflake millennials living in their parents basements way into their twenties and thirties that have been handi capped by their enabling parents to make them dysfunctional in society.

When I turned 18 my Dad handed me $50 and showed me the door and said, "Good Luck Son."
Lyzko 29 | 7,228
30 Jan 2020 #228
I think that parents who have the means to help their children are morally (although NOT legally!!) obligated to do so! Any father who'd allow his son to suffer in a lousy economy, as if things were exactly as they were during the Great Depression, ought to have his parenting license revoked....as soon as he gets one:-) After that, have his head examined.

However, surely all young men who are over the age of 25 for certain, should make every attempt possible within the limits of the law, to seek adequate domicile for themselves, and of course, secure a bare minimum of employment.

This is though more the Anglo-Saxon way. Countries such as Italy, Greece, and Spain have traditionally encouraged their children both sons as well as daughters, to live at home and even raise their families where they themselves were born, should they be lucky or privileged to do so.

Neither way is ideologically right or wrong. Yet times change and parents must accept that some things cannot, indeed should not, be as they once were. There was plenty about the "good old days" which wasn't good.
johnny reb 28 | 5,005
30 Jan 2020 #229
My point here was that if 20% of single Poles still living at home after 18 years old is not as bad as over 30% here in America.

40% if you want to count the ones in college being supported their parents too.
Lyzko 29 | 7,228
30 Jan 2020 #230
Again, if parents are ready, willing, and financially able to send their kids to school, a "good" college like one of the Ivies, who am I to stand in moral judgement?

On the other hand, as a father, I'll be damned if I'd spoon feed my boy after he'd legally old enough to provide for himself proper! Not that I haven't helped when and where I could. However, Steven soon learned neither to accept nor to expect "handouts" from dear ol' dad!
johnny reb 28 | 5,005
30 Jan 2020 #231
Again, my point was that twice as many adults live off their parents in America compared to Poland.
It was a compliment to Polish parents teaching responsibility, accountability and independence at a young age.
Miloslaw 8 | 2,819
30 Jan 2020 #232
When my kids reached their late twenties I pointed out to them that I left home when I was 21 and their mum did too.
They got the message, within a year they were both gone and have since thanked me for it.
Lyzko 29 | 7,228
30 Jan 2020 #233
My son rightly pointed out that I came of age in a slightly better economy than he. As such, I did what most self-respecting fathers would have done in my position - I used some of my connections where I worked to cut a deal and have the realtor give Steven a slight "break" on his first year's rent. The rest, I reminded him, was up to him. But if ever he needed some honest advice, I would always be there. You see, this stuff goes on all the time, only people normally don't talk about it. Anyway, I'm proud I was able to help. At least it gave the boy a feeling of independence, right?

Worked like a charm:-)

Motto here is that there is often a cover story to the erstwhile "I pulled myself up by my own bootstraps!", Horatio Alger routine.

Frequently, as George Jefferson from the now long defunct TV series would have said, Thing is, somebody done give 'em the boots and the straps!" lol

Everybody's situation is different.
Miloslaw 8 | 2,819
30 Jan 2020 #234
My son rightly pointed out that I came of age in a slightly better economy than he

That was correct of him to do so, I took that into consideration too, me and my wifes 21 translated to 26/27 for their generation.
And it worked.
Any later would have been too late.
Lyzko 29 | 7,228
30 Jan 2020 #235
Spot on, Milo!

We do find common ground on occasion, don't we.
Miloslaw 8 | 2,819
30 Jan 2020 #236
Yeah, on most social and moral aspects and anti semitism we are like brothers.
Just not on politics...... :-)
Spike31 2 | 2,148
30 Jan 2020 #237
"20% of adult Poles are single and live with Mummy"

I didn't know that we've got so many amateur archeologists in Poland?
Lyzko 29 | 7,228
30 Jan 2020 #238
Only the late Queen Mum:-)


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