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Polish patriotism, what does it mean to you?


Wroclaw Boy
3 Apr 2011 #1
Seems people have different ways of being patriotic.
picnanic
3 Apr 2011 #2
Maybe start with what does it mean for you?
David_18 68 | 982
3 Apr 2011 #3
Seems people have different ways of being patriotic.

Religious faith, honesty, national pride, courage, equality and freedom.
picnanic
3 Apr 2011 #4
Religious faith

So a person who's non-believer can't be patriotic? LOL
David_18 68 | 982
3 Apr 2011 #5
Not a true szlachta!
picnanic
3 Apr 2011 #6
Do you claim to be Polish patriot or American patriot?
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
3 Apr 2011 #7
Not a true szlachta!

It's okay - neither are you.
David_18 68 | 982
3 Apr 2011 #8
In spirit no, in blood yes ;)
picnanic
3 Apr 2011 #9
in blood yes ;)

I don't want to upset you... but you're nothing special. Most Poles have szlacheckie pochodzenie. Nothing to be snotty about
enkidu 7 | 623
3 Apr 2011 #10
David_18:
in blood yes ;)

I don't want to upset you... but you're nothing special. Most Poles have szlacheckie pochodzenie. Nothing to be snotty about

Actually not more than 8-10% of population. Hardly the "most".
picnanic
3 Apr 2011 #11
I don't believe you. I also have some vague szlacheckie pochodzenie (zubożała szlachta) and additionally from 2 different lines. I don't think it can be anything special.
delphiandomine 85 | 18,254
3 Apr 2011 #12
In spirit no, in blood yes ;)

Haha.

Right. Were they among the ones who sold Poland to Russia because they didn't want the peasants obtaining any rights?
Polonius3 1,000 | 12,448
3 Apr 2011 #13
Perhaps only 10-12% of Poland's population at a given time were registered blue-bloods with a coat of arms and all, but in genetic terms... Well, suffice it to say that Pan Hrabia was occasionally known to sow some oats amongst the chambermaids and kitchen helpers of peasant stock...so many more may have noble genes than one might imagine.
Gregrog 4 | 100
3 Apr 2011 #14
Perhaps only 10-12% of Poland's population at a given time were registered blue-bloods

Only is wrog word here. Compering to other countries in PL was far more nobles.
Des Essientes 7 | 1,291
3 Apr 2011 #15
Compering to other countries in PL was far more nobles.

This is true. Of all the countries in Europe it was Poland and Hungary that had the highest percentages of nobility in their populations.
David_18 68 | 982
3 Apr 2011 #16
I don't want to upset you... but you're nothing special. Most Poles have szlacheckie pochodzenie. Nothing to be snotty about

Who said im snotty?

I don't believe you. I also have some vague szlacheckie pochodzenie (zubożała szlachta) and additionally from 2 different lines. I don't think it can be anything special.

about 70% of the poles who got some blue blood comes from the petty "Drobna" nobility. And then we got the middle and upper nobility.

Right. Were they among the ones who sold Poland to Russia because they didn't want the peasants obtaining any rights?

Some of them yes, but with all the blood mixing throughout the centuries its impossbile to not have some bad eggs in the family.

Well, suffice it to say that Pan Hrabia was occasionally known to sow some oats amongst the chambermaids and kitchen helpers of peasant stock...so many more may have noble genes than one might imagine.

Indeed but those were the "gołota" naked nobility with no rights hold any public offices or be members of the Sejm. First after 3 generations they had equal rights to the offices and the Sejm.
ShortHairThug - | 1,103
3 Apr 2011 #17
about 70% of the poles who got some blue blood comes from the petty "Drobna" nobility. And then we got the middle and upper nobility.

Speaking of the equal rights "Szlachcic na zagrodzie równy wojewodzie", meaning that regardless of the title, the amount of land owned or the office held by any member of the nobility each one had equal rights to that of the highest order of the nobility and even wojewoda could not interfere in private affairs or the way he govern his own land. Neither could he harm him, confiscate lands etc. Those were the rights granted in Przywilej Czerwiński and Jedlneńsko-Krakowski established in early 1400's. The title meant nothing even the King could not touch the poorest of the nobility without the proper and lengthily proceedings in courts, if you had a grievance you still had to go through courts and all of it a little bit over two centuries ahead of similar law that was passed in Britain in the form of Habeas Corpus.
OP Wroclaw Boy
3 Apr 2011 #18
Maybe start with what does it mean for you?

I'm English, patriotism for me means to trying to preserve the best of British culture.
Bzibzioh
3 Apr 2011 #19
Judging from the way you butcher English language often - you are not going to get an outstanding citizen of the year prize anytime soon.
espana 17 | 910
3 Apr 2011 #20
trying to preserve the best of British culture

you are "NOT" doing a good WB.
sascha 1 | 826
3 Apr 2011 #21
preserve the best of British culture

Pie, fish & chips, hooly babies? ;)

outstanding citizen of the year prize

Mc Donald's principe? ;)

butcher English

Isnt't that standard? ;)
Stu 12 | 522
3 Apr 2011 #22
Judging from the way you butcher English language often - you are not going to get an outstanding citizen of the year prize anytime soon.

And neither will you, looking at your sentence ... .

Living in America, you said? For how long?

People in glass houses should ............ (fill in the blanks) :D.
Bzibzioh
3 Apr 2011 #23
And neither will you, looking at your sentence ... .

I'm not applying for one, being Polish and all ...
OP Wroclaw Boy
3 Apr 2011 #24
Pie, fish & chips?

Integrity and English tenacity i would say, as for food the usual.

I'm not a big fan of patriotism anyway.

I cant really think of any good reasons to be patriotic which are exclusive to GB.

Judging from the way you butcher English language often - you are not going to get an outstanding citizen of the year prize anytime soon.

says who nasty?
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
3 Apr 2011 #25
I pay taxes, that is patriotic enough for me.
Lodz_The_Boat 32 | 1,535
3 Apr 2011 #26
Being a true Pole is about loving Poland, standing up for it, to remember the various sacrifices for Poland by people before us ... to try and make the country a better place to live. To help those in need, to guide the youth, to welcome friends, to try and not make enemies.
sascha 1 | 826
3 Apr 2011 #27
Sounds epic and nice and is maybe applicable also to other countries/patriots... ;)
Lodz_The_Boat 32 | 1,535
3 Apr 2011 #28
maybe applicable also to other countries/patriots

Why not :)
Misia - | 31
3 Apr 2011 #29
If I were to judge from talking to people from Poland over the years, it's means not taking criticism of any type well.
Lodz_The_Boat 32 | 1,535
3 Apr 2011 #30
it's means not taking criticism well.

Maybe it instead means to clarify on false criticism? To be able to reply on allegations? To tell you the truth ... the real picture. To bring forward another perspective ... in a warm and friendly manner ofcourse.


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