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Polish cartoons for kids


pawian 151 | 8,029    
3 Oct 2012  #1
Probably most famous is the series Bolek and Lolek, about two quarrelsome brothers and their incredibly funny adventures:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bolek_and_Lolek

Bolek and Lolek are two Polish cartoon characters from the TV animated series by the same title (Bolek i Lolek in Polish). They are based on Władysław Nehrebecki's sons, named Jan and Roman, and were partially created by German-born Alfred Ledwig before being developed by Władysław Nehrebecki and Leszek Lorek. The series is about two young brothers and their fun and sometimes silly adventures which often involve spending a lot of time outdoors. They first appeared in an animated film in 1964.

The names of the two characters are diminutives of Bolesław and Karol. In English, the cartoon was distributed as Jym & Jam and Bennie and Lennie. Some episodes were seen as part of Nickelodeon's Pinwheel.


A few episodes which I loved as a kid:

Archeologists, 1969



Captive Princess

In Canadian Woods

and many many other....
rozumiemnic 8 | 3,686    
3 Oct 2012  #2
oh yeh Lollick and Bollick, apparently it was shown in Ireland in the 1970s.....
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
5 Oct 2012  #3
As an animal lover, I enjoyed tales about Reksio.
Reksio is a Polish cartoon character from the TV animated series by the same title. Reksio was created by a Polish director Lechosław Marszałek. Its 65 episodes were made from 1967 to 1988 in a Cartoon Movies Studio (Studio Filmów Rysunkowych) in Bielsko-Biała. All episodes describe adventures of a friendly, piebald dog named Reksio, with his animal friends - hens, cats, other dogs and their owners.


WielkiPolak 58 | 1,034    
5 Oct 2012  #4
Both cartoons currently run on TV Silesia [channel 86 for those who have a decoder] from 6 till 8pm on week days. Both have no words so they can be shown anywhere and understoof. From what I heard Bolek i Lolek was shown in other Eastern European countries as well. I preferred Reksio personally but like both. Nice cartoons with no violence or weird creatures in them anywhere like in some of the modern day comic style cartoons. Very safe for children to watch.
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
5 Oct 2012  #5
Nice cartoons with no violence

It is true for Reksio but not for Bolek and Lolek. They often fight, Bolek looks down on his brother and I never liked it as a kid. :)
TheOther 5 | 3,693    
5 Oct 2012  #6
and were partially created by German-born Alfred Ledwig before being developed by Władysław Nehrebecki and Leszek Lorek.

Not quite. The cartoon characters were created by the German Alfred Ledwig and licenced to Studio Filmów Rysunkowych until 1973, when the licence agreement expired. After that the studio used the characters illegally without paying a dime to Ledwig. 30 years of legal battles followed and the case is now at the Court of Justice of the European Union. So in essence: the Polish studio stole the characters. Nothing to be proud of... :)
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
5 Oct 2012  #7
Other, part of what you say is true, the rest is a lie.

Oppressed by communists who suspected him of supporting the opposition to the system, Ledwig decided to leave Poland in mid 1970s. For a passport, under pressure, he formally gave up his copyright to the cartoon characters.

Read the story here:

On this cartoon he brought up at least two generations of Poles. Few, however, know that the two lovable rogues born in Bielsko Animated Film Studio in 1971 were orphans. Then the Communists put their father to prison.

Alfred Ledwig, the man who created the character "Bolek and Lolek", is today a 72 - year old, ailing man. For ten years struggling to recover stolen from him in the communist period - from copyright to be used in all ways as two unruly urchins from Bielsko Biala.

The first series of adventures of "Bolek and Lolek" always ended up displaying the list of filmmakers. Among the most important authors of the cartoons mentioned was the name of Alfred Ledwig. It was under his hand came out as a skinny Bolek and good-natured, portly blonde - Lolek. In the created films after 1971 years the name of the film's leading cartoonist disappeared. None of the young viewers did not suspect then that besides colorful adventures of the most popular Polish cartoon characters hid very serious, adult drama. Plastic talent and independent thinking led Alfred Ledwig to prison and then forced to flee from Poland. His fate in no way could serve as a canvas for children bedtime story.


wgadowski.salon24.pl/166980,bolek-i-lolek-w-kraju-bolszewikow

Another series that I loved. Magic Pencil! I dreamt of having one!

Zaczarowany ołówek (Enchanted Pencil) is a Polish cartoon from 1964-1976 made by Se-ma-for. The serial had no dialogues. It tells a story of a boy named Piotr and his dog, aided by an enchanted pencil, which can materialize anything they draw. The 26 episodes have no linking story, but the last few are centered around heroes quest to save a shipwrecked refugee. There were 31 episodes total, and the episodes 27-31 were remade into a movie in 1991.
TheOther 5 | 3,693    
5 Oct 2012  #8
For a passport, under pressure, he formally gave up his copyright to the cartoon characters.

Sorry, but that's not true. The Polish high court actually ruled in favour of Ledwig in November 2000, and there are other lawsuits still pending. Google for Monika Czajkowska-Dąbrowska or read about it here (in German, bottom of page):

ddr-comics.de/bolekjur.htm
The whole case seems to be heavily influenced by Polish patriotism and politics. That probably explains why there is so much conflicting information out there.
WielkiPolak 58 | 1,034    
5 Oct 2012  #9
Zaczarowany ołowek is also shown on this TVS channel at the time I stated above. It seems like I am trying to plug the channel but they do show the classic stuff on there.

@ Pawian

As for the violence in Bolek i Lolek, yeah I know what you mean but it was not constant violence like you get in some of these hero cartoons or kids TV shows, where the object is always to fight the bad dudes. Bolek was often not very nice to his brother, it is true, that is why I preferred Reksio, he was a lovely dog.
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
5 Oct 2012  #10
Ledwig died in 2006.

In 2007 the court divided the copyright between 3 cartoonists. Ledwig`s family got 33% for his idea of the static Bolek cartoon.

The whole case is heavily influenced by Polish patriotism and politics.

Who knows? Pity, because Ledwig was a good Pole but communists destroyed him.
TheOther 5 | 3,693    
5 Oct 2012  #11
What's important in the end is Ledwig's legacy - the cartoons. Poland should treat him fairly in my opinion.
delphiandomine 85 | 17,704    
5 Oct 2012  #12
The whole case seems to be heavily influenced by Polish patriotism and politics.

Can you explain more for us who have no idea about the case?
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
5 Oct 2012  #13
Poland should treat him fairly in my opinion.

Don`t be silly.

In 1994 the prison sentence from communist times was declared void/invalid and Ledwig was rehabilitated.

In 2007 the court gave the ruling. Ledwig was one of 3 cartoonists who developed the characters and he received the copyright on static character of Bolek. Another 1/3 was appointed to Lorek for the static character of Lolek, while Nehrebecki got 33% for animation of the characters.

The case has been closed for 5 years now
TheOther 5 | 3,693    
6 Oct 2012  #14
The Polish court overturned its own ruling in 2004, and not in 2007 as you say. The new (and final) verdict granted Ledwig, Lorek and Nehrebecki 33% each, even though Ledwig had a far greater share in creating the Polish icon "Bolek and Lolek" - which had already been confirmed by Polish courts in 1988. The interpretation you'll find most often in available sources is that Poland was unable to judge in favour of a German (or Pole of German descent) for political reasons, thus forcing Ledwig's family to continue the legal fight at the higher European level. The case was not closed as you claim, it had just been moved outside of the Polish justice system. If it's still pending, that I don't know.

Does that answer your question, too, Delph?
delphiandomine 85 | 17,704    
6 Oct 2012  #15
Does that answer your question, too, Delph?

Perfectly, thank you :)
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
6 Oct 2012  #16
he interpretation you'll find most often in available sources is that Poland was unable to judge in favour of a German (or Pole of German descent) for political reasons,

I don`t think so. So far German courts have been known for judging in favour of German citizens in cases against Poles.
delphiandomine 85 | 17,704    
6 Oct 2012  #17
Such petty nationalism is common in Europe, isn't it?

It's why I think there should be a European court dedicated to cross border disputes rather than relying on national legal systems to make fair judgements. The French are notoriously bad for it.
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
6 Oct 2012  #18
Such petty nationalism is common in Europe, isn't it?

Yes, but it has reached a really monstrous dimension in Germany. A Pole has no chance at all.

Resourceful Dobromir was another series which I liked: polishforums.com/culture-38/old-cartoon-pomyslowy-dobromir-51816

dobromir of poland
TheOther 5 | 3,693    
6 Oct 2012  #19
Yes, but it has reached a really monstrous dimension in Germany. A Pole has no chance at all.

What on Earth are you talking about? The court case is at the European Court of Human Rights; Germany or German courts have nothing to do with it and never had.
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
6 Oct 2012  #20
What on Earth are you talking about?

I am talking about my answer

So far German courts have been known for judging in favour of German citizens in cases against Poles.

to your statement

The interpretation you'll find most often in available sources is that Poland was unable to judge in favour of a German (or Pole of German descent) for political reasons,

You don`t like it? :):):):)
TheOther 5 | 3,693    
6 Oct 2012  #21
I don't care, Pawian, because that was not my personal opinion but a statement based on the sources that are available on the web. It seems that you have a problem with it, but I'm not astonished. Poland screwed Ledwig big time and instead of acknowledging it, you come up with finger-pointing and destracting from the real issue. Typical PF response from your side, my friend. Poland screwed that guy, and that is the reason why the case is at the European Court now. Just look at the timeline and what was done to Ledwig, and you will see that there is no excuse whatsoever for the Polish court decision.
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
6 Oct 2012  #22
Now, for a change, cartoons I didn`t like.

Dumb He-goat was a peculiar series. About a halfwit creature and full of violence. I was really surprised they showed that crap on state television in 1970s.

poland bajka

]

Extreme violence at 7:30
Gold Rush
Hold uu

I didn`t like Dumb He-Goat but I watched it anyway. Better that than nothing.

However, I really hated another series - Colargol Teddy Bear, about am unhappy creature who is always misunderstood and rejected by others. That was so awful! What was even worse, the bear looks stupid and his voice is ridiculous.

Poland Koralgol

Following the success of the Colargol albums Albert Barillé's animation company Procidis started production on Les Aventures de Colargol, a stop-motion animated series starring Colargol. Barillé enlisted the Polish animator Tadeusz Wilkosz and Se-ma-for in £ódź to create the animation.

The series was produced from 1967 to 1974, comprising 53 thirteen-minute episodes which were broadcast in many European countries. Les Aventures de Colargol was renamed Barnaby when it was dubbed into English and broadcast in the UK by the BBC. The series underwent another name change when a second dubbed version of the series was shown in Canada (and also in the UK and Ireland), this time as Jeremy the Bear.

The series was also turned into three motion picture films in Poland: Colargol na Dzikim Zachodzie (Colargol in the Wild West) in 1976, Colargol zdobywcą kosmosu (Colargol, the Conqueror of Space) in 1978, and Colargol i cudowna walizka (Colargol and the Magic Suitcase) in 1979.



TheOther 5 | 3,693    
6 Oct 2012  #23
It's why I think there should be a European court dedicated to cross border disputes rather than relying on national legal systems to make fair judgements.

When it comes to questions regarding common EU law, there is one already: the European Court of Justice.

Yes, but it has reached a really monstrous dimension in Germany. A Pole has no chance at all.

And you have of course an equally monstrous number of links to prove it... :)
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
7 Oct 2012  #24
I didn`t appreciate cats as a child but I quite appreciated this feline series from mid 1970sThe Adventures of Filemon the Cat. And I loved the soundtrack.

The two main characters are: Filemon, a little white kitten, young and naïve; and Bonifacy, an old, serious black tomcat. Other characters are: the Grandmother, the Grandfather, a fox, mice, 'monsters from the attic' and other creatures. The cartoon is rich in elements of folk legends and traditions from a certain region of Poland.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Przygody_kota_Filemona

See the Polish village 30 years ago:
WielkiPolak 58 | 1,034    
8 Oct 2012  #25
The Koziołek Matołek comic was better than the cartoon.
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
8 Oct 2012  #26
Yes! It was the first Polish comic story, when there wasn`t any TV yet. I knew it was old but never suspected it was created in 1933.

s

s
pgtx 29 | 3,160    
8 Oct 2012  #27
all the cartoons are pretty old. they do not make new cartoons for kids in Poland anymore?
OP pawian 151 | 8,029    
8 Oct 2012  #28
all the cartoons are pretty old.

Yes, I know, and that was my intention to start with the old ones. Just for the sake of sentimental recollections.

they do not make new cartoons for kids in Poland anymore?

Yes, they do. But I will abstain from presenting them right now as they don`t belong to my sentimental memories.

Is it plausible and forgivable? :):):)

PS. Of course, other younger guys may freely contribute with modern cartoons.
jon357 64 | 14,382    
8 Oct 2012  #29
Koziołek Matołek

We had that one in England, years ago.
Dziedzic 3 | 43    
8 Oct 2012  #30
Very nice thread topic Pawian, thanks for your contribution. Enjoyed learning about polish cartoons. I grew up in the USA but all my family is from Poland. We never had those cartoons here.


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