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Weird names Polish parents give to their kids


JaneDoe 5 | 114
10 Feb 2011 #1
Polish parents give their lovely children weird, crazy and funny names.

Grzmisława, Żaklina and Bobek are only a few of way too many examples.

What was the weirdest name you came across in Poland?
jonni 16 | 2,485
10 Feb 2011 #2
Gniewomir
SeanBM 35 | 5,808
10 Feb 2011 #3
What was the weirdest name you came across in Poland?

As a foreigner in Poland, I always thought it was odd that Asia (not the continent) was short for Joanna.
And I once made the horrendous mistake of calling out Barabara for Barbra, (when I first arrived in my best Polish accent) during role call.
tygrys 2 | 294
11 Feb 2011 #4
Polish parents give their lovely children weird, crazy and funny names

Maybe to you they are but a parent can name their child whatever they want.
OP JaneDoe 5 | 114
11 Feb 2011 #5
a parent can name their child whatever they want.

In Poland?
kondzior 10 | 976
11 Feb 2011 #6
As a foreigner in Poland, I always thought it was odd that Asia (not the continent) was short for Joanna.

Well, a diminutive to Joanna is Joasia. And short for Joasia is Asia. The continent though, in Polish it is called Azja. It is also a name. But not very popular one. Azja Tuhajbejowicz... a popular anti-hero.
Wroclaw Boy
11 Feb 2011 #7
Good theres way to many Agnes's, kasia's magda's, Jaceks and pawels.
emha - | 92
11 Feb 2011 #8
Tradycja
frejkow - | 1
11 Feb 2011 #9
My grandfather offered my dad 1,000 dollars to name me Hipolite after my great grandfather. My dad said "no way in hell".
puella 4 | 172
11 Feb 2011 #10
I always thought it was odd that Asia (not the continent) was short for Joanna.

It's simple: Joanna - Joasia - Asia

I always wondered why Russian name Alexander is shorted to Sasha. That is the real oddness! ;)

..................................................................

Kostek, Roch, Kosma, Sława...
noreenb 7 | 557
12 Feb 2011 #11
Sameligelimelion or it's a mistake in callendar.
hague1cmaeron 14 | 1,377
12 Feb 2011 #12
My grandfather offered my dad 1,000 dollars to name me Hipolite after my great grandfather. My dad said "no way in hell".

If I was your dad, that would be your name(:
grubas 12 | 1,391
12 Feb 2011 #13
And you could call him Hipek.
tygrys 2 | 294
12 Feb 2011 #14
I always wondered why Russian name Alexander is shorted to Sasha

Means also Olek
Albanaich 2 | 31
20 Feb 2011 #15
Alexander to Sasha? The pronouciation. Alexander is shortened to Sandy in Scotland. There's an invisible S between Alex and ander
musicwriter 5 | 87
20 Feb 2011 #16
I the name Władysława still given to girls in Poland? In the U.S. many women with that name have changed it to Lottie.
Cardno85 31 | 976
20 Feb 2011 #17
It's simple: Joanna - Joasia - Asia

I must ask then, what is the explanation for Aleksandra-Ola??
asik 2 | 220
20 Feb 2011 #18
Yeah, that's crazy, I don't get it why in Polish is Ola/Olek not Aleksa/Alek or even why not Sandra/Sander

Aleksandra - Ola (female)
Aleksander - Olek (male)

Alexander to Sasha? The pronouciation. Alexander is shortened to Sandy in Scotland. There's an invisible S between Alex and ander

It's visible in Polish Aleksander
expert
8 Mar 2011 #19
Polish parents give their lovely children weird, crazy and funny names.

With most of them there is a tradition, history, heritage, things that we are proud of
US is particular must be the most retarded collection of 'made up' names that are directly related to brain farts
gumishu 11 | 5,142
8 Mar 2011 #20
I must ask then, what is the explanation for Aleksandra-Ola??

it is a historical one - in many Polish dialects of the past 'a' sounds in certain positions developed into o's

this is certainly evident in comparison of some Polish and Czech words

krowa - krava (cow)
głowa - hlava (head)
broda - brada (beard)

the forms with a's are evidenced to be historically older so Czech retained older forms inherited from 'Common Slavic' while Polish (and similarily Russian) have introduced o's in the place of some a's

in some Polish dialects the phenomenon continued for much longer historically and has much broader scope therefore- that's why standard Polish 'ptak' (a bird) is 'ptok' in Silesian and many other Polish southern dialects like that of Górale (which sounds Górole in their speech - Górale speech also has different way of accenting words - most get accented on the initial sylable) - standard Polish 'krowa' turns into 'krowo' in Silesian as a further example

the use of the name Aleksandra and Aleksander in Polish dates back to the times that a-> o sound alteration was still active in those dialects that influenced Polish literary language - however the name Alicja was adopted later and the short name developed was Ala - no further a->o sound alteration was active by then in the standard literary Polish (as far as I know more northern dialects overtook as those that were recognized as 'proper Polish')
Havok 10 | 912
8 Mar 2011 #21
Read this.

"A 3-year-old boy named Adolf Hitler and his two Nazi-named younger sisters..."

foxnews.com/story/0,2933,479904,00.html
isthatu2 4 | 2,704
8 Mar 2011 #22
My grandfather offered my dad 1,000 dollars to name me Hipolite after my great grandfather. My dad said "no way in hell".

For that money i'll name my first son Hipolite in honour of your great grandfather...:)

Read this.

have they got their kids back yet?
its sinister that people name their kids after famous nazis but its also sinister that without investigation beyond shock at the names those kids can be removed by the local authorities and put in care....maybe its the best place for them,maybe their parents just need a bit of "guidence" ....oh,and a quick look in the mirror,if they are the master race Im a 6.7 kenyan.......
Havok 10 | 912
8 Mar 2011 #23
maybe its the best place for them,maybe their parents just need a bit of "guidence"

I think that's the whole point. They’re irresponsible and potentially damaging to their kids. We don't need people like that raising our new generation.

As a kid, can you imagine going through life named after dictator and mass murderer? The line has to be drawn.
gumishu 11 | 5,142
8 Mar 2011 #24
As a kid, can you imagine going through life named after dictator and mass murderer? The line has to be drawn.

Lenin and Stalin were popular first names given to children born to some politically driven people in Latin America some time ago (I guess it was 40's and 50's)
Havok 10 | 912
8 Mar 2011 #25
An interesting point, so do you think those parents should have their kids back and everyone should go about their business as usual?

Would you want your kids to go to school with little Adolph and Aryan knowing they were being raised by those two?
gumishu 11 | 5,142
8 Mar 2011 #26
Would you want your kids to go to school with little Adolph and Aryan knowing they were being raised by those two?

I haven't mentioned those little Lenins and Stalins to suggest anything involving the fate of that poor Adolph Hitler kid - I would be very much for giving the parents a lecture on how they have adversely affected the lives of their children calling them such names - I don't know if it be somehow legally regulated
pgtx 29 | 3,159
8 Mar 2011 #27
Adolph and Aryan

those wouldn't be names given in Poland... it'd be Adolf...
Poles used to give nice traditional names to their kids, until they got crazy and name daughters Andżelika and Dżoana...
but still Poles don't beat one of American names Apple, for ex.
:D
isthatu2 4 | 2,704
8 Mar 2011 #28
still Poles don't beat one of American names Apple

for shame,thats half English .....if your on about gwinnie and chris' sprog :)
Lalusz - | 1
8 Mar 2011 #29
English doesn't make much sense, either.
How do we get Jack from John?

jonni 16 | 2,485
8 Mar 2011 #30
How do we get Jack from John?

It was originally from James/Jacques.


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