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How should "Polish" be written? Maybe Polski?


moseleyphotos 1 | 8
4 Jan 2012 #1
Hi, can somebody please tell me how 'Polish' would be written in the Polish language please. I know that Poland would be Polska, but unsure if Polish would be written the same?

Many thanks
Zman
4 Jan 2012 #2
polski (m) OR: polska (f) OR: polskie (plural non-masculine) OR: polscy (masculine)
OP moseleyphotos 1 | 8
4 Jan 2012 #3
Brilliant, thank you. So if I was to title a photography exhibition (depicting the Polish migrant workers experience in the UK) it would be correct to use Polskie Passages?

Many thanks
gumishu 11 | 5,496
4 Jan 2012 #4
I'm not sure what you mean by passages here (I am not that proficient in English to be honest) - if the title is (as I guess) meant to attract general English public (including many Poles) then it is a good idea to mix both languages in the title like you did - and Polskie Passages is actually very good even better than Polski Passages - a title in Polish only won't attract many English people as they would think this is purely Polish and for Poles (I believe Polskie Passages has some obvious meaning to English people which I don't know simply for sure) - the other solution is to have parallel titles in English and in Polish (but I cannot suggest a good titles now - need to look up what passages can mean (appart from the meanings I am familiar with)

I don't believe you wanted the title in Polish only btw
ShAlEyNsTfOh 4 | 161
4 Jan 2012 #5
a Polish man/woman = polak/polka ... Polish people = polacy

the Polish language = Polszczyzna or język Polski

Polish bread = chleb polski

:D
adonis - | 4
4 Jan 2012 #6
Polszczyzna - no Englishman will pronounce it correctly. too much sz and cz together
Harry
4 Jan 2012 #7
a title in Polish only won't attract many English people as they would think this is purely Polish and for Poles

For once we agree.

What about a Polish word well known to Brits and an English word well known to Poles? I quite like the ring of "Solidarnosc Great Britain?" but you might not.
ShAlEyNsTfOh 4 | 161
4 Jan 2012 #8
no Englishman will pronounce it correctly. too much sz and cz together

and no Pole can pronounce their 'th' and 'ph' sounds, or even the english 'R' correctly... myself included.

the word 'reward' is a nightmare for me to pronounce, and i've been learning/speaking english for 20 years now. lol :D
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
4 Jan 2012 #9
Polszczyzna - no Englishman will pronounce it correctly

Wanna bet?
ShAlEyNsTfOh 4 | 161
4 Jan 2012 #10
how much?

I need grocery money for this week :D
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
4 Jan 2012 #11
As much as you like - anyone who speaks Polish and doesn't have a wada wymowy can pronounce it.

The one word I have problems with (only when drunk) is chrzciciel - and even JP2 had problems with that word.
ShAlEyNsTfOh 4 | 161
4 Jan 2012 #12
JonnyM

all of my office co-workers couldn't pronounce the word 'Polszczyzna'

they also have a lot of trouble pronouncing the name, Agnieszka..particularly this jamaican lady who keeps coming back to my desk and asking me to pronounce it for her. lool!
Harry
4 Jan 2012 #13
As much as you like - anyone who speaks Polish and doesn't have a wada wymowy can pronounce it.

Can I join this bet? After holidays in Szczebrzeszyn and Szczyrk, this is basically free money.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
4 Jan 2012 #15
Can I join this bet? After holidays in Szczebrzeszyn and Szczyrk, this is basically free money.

Exactly. Maybe we should have a side bet with Grzegorz Brzęczyszczykiewicz from Chrząszczyżewoszyce in powiat £ękołody!

OK back to the topic. How the word "Polish" is written, and NOT how it's pronounced
Harry
4 Jan 2012 #16
another good example.

And also a very nice place to visit, especially now they have finished renovating the rynek (not that it's called that) and the former synagogue.
JonnyM 11 | 2,620
4 Jan 2012 #17
OK back to the topic. How the word "Polish" is written, and NOT how it's pronounced

One of the easiest things about Polish is precisely that; it is written just as it is pronounced and vice-versa.

Polskie Passages

Sounds odd and a little vulgar.
Vincent 9 | 825 Moderator
4 Jan 2012 #18
One of the easiest things about Polish is precisely that; it is written just as it is pronounced and vice-versa.

Mostly so, but if someone didn't know about voiced/unvoiced consonants, they could still make a "pigs ear" of it:)
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
4 Jan 2012 #19
a Polish man/woman = Polak/Polka ... Polish people = Polacy

the Polish language = polszczyzna or język polski

Fix'd
OP moseleyphotos 1 | 8
5 Jan 2012 #20
Hi, thanks everybody.

The title is meant to describe the transition Polish workers make living in the Uk, the journey they go on. You are right I did hope to use a Polish and English word together - In English I would have titled it Polish Passages. The dictionary description of Passage is as follows - 'an act or instance of passing from one place, condition, etc., to another; transit.'

I am wondering now if it should be titled Polacy Passages? But am unsure most English people would know this word, where as Polskie or Polska is widely known.

Thanks for any advice
ColdSteel - | 20
14 Jan 2012 #21
I don't think it's a good name. It sounds and looks weird and horrible, like translated by computer or someone who knows only a few Polish words. Why don't you choose one language or use a double name like 'Polish Passages - Polskie przejścia'?

'Polacy Ppassages' sounds even worse, how do you want to join it, 'Poles Passages' doesn't make sense even in English...?
OP moseleyphotos 1 | 8
17 Jan 2012 #22
Thanks for your reply, the idea of combining a word from both languages was to avoid exclusion, yet still an English audience would know the meaning of the title.

Your double name of 'Polish Passages - Polskie przejścia'? is an option, (possibly a bit long) but may well be my preferred option.
Thanks again
pawian 175 | 13,563
5 Sep 2020 #23
and Polskie Passages is actually very good even better than Polski Passages

Nope. Either all Polish or all English - no in-betweens. Similarly, it is either Polish Sausage or Polska Kiełbasa. I haven`t seen Polska Sausage.
mafketis 24 | 8,951
5 Sep 2020 #24
But Polish kielbasa is a normal American construction....
pawian 175 | 13,563
5 Sep 2020 #25
But here it is the case of using the Polish word "Polski" with and English word.
mafketis 24 | 8,951
5 Sep 2020 #26
not as acceptable but with English, a language with loose rules, minimal to no part-of-speech marking and no central authority "He bought some Polski sausage" is not as bad as "Kupił italiano makaron" or "Lubię american naleśniki" would be
pawian 175 | 13,563
5 Sep 2020 #27
OK, if you say so... :)


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