The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Language  % width posts: 147

Do Poles prefer US American or UK English language?


Trevek 26 | 1,702
21 Mar 2010 #61
Having the odd tame American in a school helps, as I find I have to learn American because my students don't always know the difference (and if I make a spelling mistake I can claim it's AmEng spelling!).

Likewise, if an American is preparing studes for a cambridge exam it is useful if some of the grammar differences can be explained.

possibly because the gold standard is a Cambridge qualification.

Even tho' you can use either AmEng or BritEng in the exams, as long as you're consistent. That's the hardest part, if you don't know the difference.
OP Polonius3 1,000 | 12,446
22 Mar 2010 #62
I've found many Poles really freaked out by black gehtto speech. Anybody on PF agree?
aphrodisiac 11 | 2,444
22 Mar 2010 #63
I've found many Poles really freaked out by black gehtto speech.

never heard of that. You are making things up again.

Anybody on PF agree?

NO
Lyzko
22 Mar 2010 #64
Sadly, so-called "ghetto", i.e. the "rapper" idiom is overtaking the standard language among the younger European English learners. More often the coarse, vulgar and thowaway speech of the culturally disenfanchised has become more popularly accepted as "cool" and the true, correct and aethetically pleasing American of decades gone by, is deemed by our youth and others who pander to their whims, as too "white bread", obsolete, "uncool", and therefore, unacceptable.

All of us are getting shortchanged, most of all the English language itself, now a cesspool of its former glory.
Chicago Pollock 7 | 504
5 Jul 2010 #65
I've found many Poles really freaked out by black gehtto speech. Anybody on PF agree?

never heard of that. You are making things up again

It's not ghetto speech as much it is a separate American English dialect from the region of the South where they originally came from. America has different accents but dialects are rare, i can only think of three: Appalachia, South Louisiana Cajun and Southern Black. There may be more that I don't know of.
mafketis 24 | 8,936
5 Jul 2010 #66
Up until about 2004 I'd say it was roughly 50/50 among those with a preference based more than the idea that English English was more correct or proper.

When Poland joined the EU and Poles started migrating to the UK British became very dominant (and W Bush was generally unpopular here so that didn't help anything).

I'd say (maybe) in the last year or two American has regained some popularity but it's still nowhere near where it was pre-EU.

In commie times some Poles who'd never heard (or heard of) Black English did kind of freak out when they heard it live the first time in the US. "What language are they speaking?" was a common reaction.

IME younger people now are curious about it and not freaked out at all. A fakultet (elective) course in an English department on Black English would probably be pretty popular.
Bondi 4 | 142
12 Jul 2010 #67
Did you see this, was posted before:

Not bad, but when it comes to British accents, this Scottish bloke is the classic :)

youtube.com/watch?v=KH_kOjsXakM
Miguel Colombia - | 351
12 Jul 2010 #68
American English owns.

I don't like the UK English: Too fancy, too gay and aesthetic.
mvefa 5 | 591
12 Jul 2010 #69
Obviously you have never been to the UK ;)
Wroclaw Boy
12 Jul 2010 #70
American English owns.

I don't like the UK English: Too fancy, too gay and aesthetic.

Both languages are far to diverse (regions and accents) to pigeon hole, and what does aesthetic mean in that context?
convex 20 | 3,978
12 Jul 2010 #71
It is pretty amazing to see how dramatically the accents on the island change over just a short distance vs. the large cover of accents in the US...not to mention the pop culture neutral accent in the US..
Miguel Colombia - | 351
12 Jul 2010 #72
Obviously you have never been to the UK ;)

No, but I have met many Britons :)

what does aesthetic mean in that context?

I don't know. I just wanted to use that word :P
Bartolome 2 | 1,085
12 Jul 2010 #73
I prefer any accent that's easy to understand. Generally, it's down to individuals.
mvefa 5 | 591
12 Jul 2010 #74
No, but I have met many Britons :)

seriously, american english is really annoying, specially the like like like like like like every 2 words again a "like, like, like, like, like....geee , learn a new word!!!
Amathyst 19 | 2,702
12 Jul 2010 #75
No, but I have met many Britons :)

Im curious to know where they were from if you found them gay sounding..In my city alone there are a few different accents - from a Rochdale accent to a Hulme accent..I very much doubt you'd be able to tell the difference though, which brings me to the fact I think you're talking complete bollox. Most foreigners cant tell the difference between a South London accent and a Newcastle accent and they're about as different as you can get!
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,883
12 Jul 2010 #76
mvefa wrote:

seriously, american english is really annoying, specially the like like like like like like every 2 words again a "like, like, like, like, like....geee , learn a new word!!!

similarly, in the UK, bloody, bloody, bloody, mate, mate, mate, mate, mate X 100, bloody bloody, bloody...

and yes, the overuse of "like" in America is annoying.

Ametyst wrote:

Im curious to know where they were from if you found them gay sounding..

it's the same opinion most americans share. UK English simply sounds pompous, wimpy and fruity to us, especially when spoken by men. the sound of an irritated British guy simply isn't intimidating.
mvefa 5 | 591
12 Jul 2010 #77
it's the same opinion most americans share. UK English simply sounds pompous, wimpy and fruity to us, especially when spoken by men.

It doesnt, it just that you think that having some culture and finesse on you vocabulary is inmediately gay. I understand it because of the colony issue, and history and so on...totally understanable but not true ;) to the most of the world it does not sound gay...just the americans
Once
12 Jul 2010 #78
I read that there are 10,000 brits living in Poland on a permanent basis, those will be the numbers of Brits registered of course.
Wroclaw Boy
12 Jul 2010 #79
it's the same opinion most americans share. UK English simply sounds pompous, wimpy and fruity to us, especially when spoken by men. the sound of an irritated British guy simply isn't intimidating.

The way the English English language is portrayed in the US is always the same, some twat talking with a posh Queens English accent, i agree its gay and pathetic truth its just not like that at all in reality.
jwojcie 2 | 763
12 Jul 2010 #80
Well, for me it is not question what do I prefer... It is rather question how many movies I saw in US English vs UK English... Definitely I saw much more US English so it is a lot easier to me understand US English than UK English. So even if I like sound of UK English, US English beats it because of quantity.

In the end it is quantity not quality issue (even if most of my polish teachers were trained in UK English). Wasn't it Copernicus who discover the rule that bad money tend to displace good ones ;-)
Miguel Colombia - | 351
12 Jul 2010 #81
"like, like, like, like, like....geee , learn a new word!!!

But American English is like, like,like so hip!

Im curious to know where they were from if you found them gay sounding..In my city alone there are a few different accents - from a Rochdale accent to a Hulme accent..I very much doubt you'd be able to tell the difference though, which brings me to the fact I think you're talking complete bollox. Most foreigners cant tell the difference between a South London accent and a Newcastle accent and they're about as different as you can get!

Whatever.

bloody, bloody, bloody, mate, mate, mate, mate, mate X 100, bloody bloody, bloody...

Or "I".
kondzior 12 | 1,127
12 Jul 2010 #82
I have a hard time telling US English form UK one. Like, I do know that one nation uses "apartament" and the other "flat" but at the moment cannot remember exactly who. "Ass" and "arse". "Push ups" and "press ups" (these are "pompki", right?). I usually treat these words as synonyms.
Miguel Colombia - | 351
12 Jul 2010 #83
"Ass" and "arse".

Americans say ass.

Britons say arse.

People who say "arse" are asses.
Seanus 15 | 19,706
12 Jul 2010 #84
MC, time to come off the Ritalin. It clearly isn't helping you.

Some Poles prefer US English, others prefer UK English.
Miguel Colombia - | 351
12 Jul 2010 #86
Some Poles prefer US English, others prefer UK English.

Wow, did you come up with that on yourself? That's probably one of the most creative, awe-inspiring deductions in the history of logical thinking!

I am truly amazed.
f stop 25 | 2,513
12 Jul 2010 #87
which one is this:

youtube.com/watch?v=8nI6sUSizWk
CheFinny 5 | 45
12 Jul 2010 #88
I think you'll find that 'British English' is simply caled English. As a linguist it really annoys me when people make this mistake.
Magdalena 3 | 1,837
12 Jul 2010 #89
I think you'll find that 'British English' is simply called English

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_English
Wroclaw Boy
12 Jul 2010 #90
Eubank trying to talk Queens English, LOL - I loved Eubank. What a boxer! Allways wanted to be a smart guy. Hell he was, to a certain extent.

youtube.com/watch?v=QF-jd_R15EI


Home / Language / Do Poles prefer US American or UK English language?
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.