The BEST Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives 
 
 
User: Guest

Home / Language  % width posts: 14

Nickname for a small boy


BoPri319
15 Jul 2021 #1
If I wanted to call a young boy, aged 2 and up, a firefly or lightning bug, as a loving nickname, what would it be?
What about spark - as in spark of magic or power? Trying to write a story about a young boy who has inherited magic from his mother's side of the family, and has potential to be a powerful mage. Thanks in advance!
pawian 179 | 16,417
15 Jul 2021 #2
What about spark

You mean spark in English or iskra in Polish?
OP BoPri319
16 Jul 2021 #3
Well, in English, Spark would be one option. I didn't know if it would carry the same connotations in Polish. Also, I want to be able to make a diminutive - like in English, one could use "Sparky", but from a loving standpoint, a parent my affectionately refer to the child as, "My little spark."

@pawian
Also, I kind of like the idea that this child's going to have huge magical power. Like a lightning bolt. But, as a child, he's just more like a lightning bug....for the moment. Wasn't sure if calling your kid: "My little lightning bug. My little firefly. Always full of energy. Always zipping around..." Wasn't sure if this would make sense from a Polish culture standpoint. Also was wondering what could sound cutest, to the English speaking ear...
Ironside 51 | 11,510
16 Jul 2021 #4
child's going to have huge magical power.

that is sweet but don't post that on the internet sounds weird
pawian 179 | 16,417
16 Jul 2021 #5
make sense from a Polish culture standpoint.

Who is going to be the recipient of your literature? Coz now it got confusing

sound cutest, to the English speaking ear...

So, English or Polish readers?
Paulina 12 | 2,062
16 Jul 2021 #6
@BoPri319, bear in mind that the Polish word "iskra" is of feminine gender, so not everyone would call a boy like that. I guess it could be "Iskierek" when a little boy and "Iskier" when he would grow older. Such word doesn't exist in Polish, but I can imagine it as a nickname.

A "firefly" is "świetlik" in Polish. A diminutive would be "swietliczek".

"My little spark."

"Little spark" would be "iskierka".

Always full of energy. Always zipping around..."

I'd go for the sparky version then :)
OP BoPri319
16 Jul 2021 #7
Sorry. Let me clarify. The child is American, first or second generation Polish on his mother's side. The story takes place in the US. The maternal grandmother and mother are the ones giving him the nicknames in Polish, when he is a little boy - which is why the names and phrases need to make sense from a Polish culture standpoint. The child inherited his magical abilities through his maternal grandmother, going back over a thousand years, but he is the first extremely powerful male mage in several centuries. When I looked up the word for 'spark' in Polish, I wasn't sure if it, 1) conveyed the same meaning - spark of energy, spark of potential, also, 2), to my untrained ears, the literal word for spark didn't sound like it would be a cute sort of nickname you might reasonably give to a rambunctious, hyperactive 2 year old boy. 3) I don't know if has a diminutive form. Actually, in the US, "Sparky" is a common name for a dog. You'd refer to a child as "My little spark," instead of "Sparky."

Ok. One more thing. As an alternative to "spark", I really liked the idea of referring to the child, and his magical potential, as a bolt of lightning. And, since he's a little boy, and always zipping around, full of energy, I thought the nicknames "lightning bug" and "firefly" were cute, and also really appropriate. In the US, both refer to the same kind of insect. I looked it up, and saw that Poland has fireflies.
Paulina 12 | 2,062
16 Jul 2021 #8
@BoPri319, in Polish "iskierka" (little spark) would be perfect for a hyperactive (and joyful) little kid. A mother or grandmother could call also a boy like that. And it's sweet and cute :) ("Moja mała iskierka" - my little spark). The problem would be with the boy growing older. "Iskra" would be better for a girl, that's why I coined that nickname "Iskier" for you.

I wasn't sure if it, 1) conveyed the same meaning - spark of energy

Yes, I'd say so.

spark of potential

I don't think so...

I thought the nicknames "lightning bug" and "firefly" were cute, and also really appropriate.

Personally I associate the word "świetlik" with light only. It would be maybe better for a child full of internal light and probably rather gentle and not a hyperactive kid. That's my take at least...
pawian 179 | 16,417
16 Jul 2021 #9
"spark",

Paulina explained everything thoroughly,, I have nothing to add. Calling the boy Spark/Sparky in English or Iskierka in Polish seems really OK.

Still sth to add:
Do you know there is frolicsome Skierka character - a fairy - in one of Polish dramas? Primary school students have to do it in Polish class. :):) I mean "Balladyna."
OP BoPri319
16 Jul 2021 #10
Ok. So. Iskierka for him as a little boy, changed to Iskier as he gets older?
Paulina 12 | 2,062
17 Jul 2021 #11
@BoPri319, yes, I think so, however "Iskier" sounds pretty serious, adult-like and I don't know what age that boy will reach in your story, so I'd go with "iskierka" up until the age of 5, then something in between - "Iskierek" until the age of 10, I guess, and when he enters teenage years: "Iskier".

Also, as for "iskierka" - it would be normally used as a term of endearment, like "słoneczko" (literally "little sun", could be translated as "sunshine") or "skarb" (treasure).

Btw, I probably should add that giving men nicknames which are nouns of feminine gender isn't completely unheard of in Poland... I personally know of such examples probably only in case of soldiers though, like, for example, a legendary Polish resistance Home Army fighter during World War II, whose nom de guerre was "Zośka" (it's a first name that only girls are given). Also, some of the soldiers from Polish Special Forces get nicknames which are nouns of feminine gender, like "Sowa" (owl) or "Burza" (storm), there's also a guy whose nickname was "Magda" (again, a female first name). So, in theory, I guess everything is possible :)

You know, as a woman I'm not sure if a boy would mind being called "Iskra" or not... Perhaps Polish guys should comment on this, because maybe I got too focused on the gender of that noun... "Iskra" does sound cool in Polish :), but I figured "Iskier" would be less likely to raise eyebrows ;)

Sorry if I'm confusing you more than helping ;D
pawian 179 | 16,417
17 Jul 2021 #12
yes, I think so, however "Iskier" sounds pretty serious,

Yes, that is why I would opt for Iskra even though it is feminine. There is equality after all and big boys can bear whatever name they want. There are many males whose second name is Maria so why should Iskra be a problem?

Besides, when readers see such a name and know the gender of the character is male, the feminine origin of the name becomes supressed and masculinised in the reader`s mind. It is typical psychology of reading.
BoPri319 - | 1
17 Jul 2021 #13
Given what I've said about this proposed character...How would you translate the following, "When you grow up, you will become very powerful."
"You come from an ancient family."

Thank you all, very much, for your help!
Paulina 12 | 2,062
18 Jul 2021 #14
"When you grow up, you will become very powerful."

"Kiedy dorośniesz, staniesz się bardzo potężny."

The one above is an exact translation, but this one is also possible:

"Kiedy dorośniesz, będziesz miał wielką moc." (When you grow up, you will have great power.)

Here the word "moc" (power) suggests magical powers.

"You come from an ancient family."

"Pochodzisz ze starego rodu."

Thank you all, very much, for your help!

You're welcome :)


Home / Language / Nickname for a small boy
BoldItalic [quote]
 
To post as Guest, enter a temporary username or login and post as a member.