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Extremely Hard - Polish the hardest language to learn


McDouche 6 | 286
21 Sep 2013 #31
I would argue English is one of the hardest languages to learn for the fact that reading and writing is not phonetic!

I've heard countless Poles say that English is easy yet they make so many mistakes!
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
21 Sep 2013 #32
That actually happened to me in Germany, but never in Poland. As I was going through customs in Berlin returning to the States when the customs official called me aside and damned near INSISTED that I speak the language of my (US!!!) passport because he didn't believe I was American:-) He had to satisfy his curiosity as to why a native-born Yank spoke German like a German.

Poles on the other hand, knew I was not Polish (yet never guessed where I was from). They spoke nothing but Polish with me, including those who knew English, and seemed to understand me about as easily as I seemed to understand them.

Because, McDouche, there's basically no standard for English in Poland, much as is the case unfortunately throughout the rest of the non-Anglo-Saxon world. Germans too often claim to speak excellent English, yet make such egregious errors as to make the shackles of one's hair stand on end!!
Bieganski 17 | 901
21 Sep 2013 #33
Germans too often claim to speak excellent English, yet make such egregious errors as to make the shackles of one's hair stand on end!!

Much like the British foreigners who go around falsely believing they can speak Polish. Perhaps they do but it is just their version of it!
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
21 Sep 2013 #34
Indeed!

"Ja dziękuję w awansowanie" = I thank you in advance vs. "Dziękuję z góry." along with numerous similar English to Polish word-for-word translations??? They think it's Polish, but it AIN'T!!!!

Hysterical, no?
Michał
5 Jan 2014 #35
Nie no wiecie co panowie ( i panie ) trochę przesadzacie. Polski nie jest aż tak trudnym językiem, gdyż najtrudniejszą rzeczą która tutaj się przejawia jest generalnie wymowa samych wyrazów i interpretacja zmiękczeń typu ą ę ź ń ś ł ó itd... Poza tym w waszym języku (mówię tu o Angielskim) jest wiele bardzo podobnych wyrazów, gdzie niektóre składnie wyrazowe są wymawiane podobnie. Gdyby któryś z Was chciałby skonsultować się ze mną to proszę piszcie na MDziedzic.fiat126p@gmail Oczywiście gdy będziecie pisać po angielsku starajcie się pisać jak najprościej, gdyż mój Angielski także nie jest perfekt.

Do not y'know what, gentlemen (and ladies) a little overreacting. Polish is not as difficult language, because the hardest thing that manifests itself here is generally the same pronunciation of words and interpretation zmiękczeń type ą ę ż ź ń ł ó ś etc. .. Moreover in your own language (I'm talking about English) is a lot of very similar words, where some of the syntax of expression are pronounced similarly. If any of you would like to consult with me, please write to MDziedzic.fiat126p @ gmail Of course, when you write in English, try to write as simply, because my English is also not perfect. Translated by GOOGLE translate
Wulkan - | 3,250
5 Jan 2014 #36
A lot of Poles are so complexed that they make up stupid theories according to wich they are always superior or unique

It's the foreigners who make that claim when they struggle to learn Polish so what are you talking about son?

If any of you would like to consult with me,

Why would they want to consult anything with you. There is a bunch of native Polish speakers on this forum, including myself, who also speak fluent English ( używając google translatora ośmieszasz się)
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
5 Jan 2014 #37
"...where some of the syntax of expression are pronounced similarly...."

Could you possibly provide examples of 'some of the syntax of expression' which are pronounced similarly? Are you perhaps referring here to like-sounding grammatical constructs, maybe prepositional usage which might cause confusion for Poles learning English, e.g. "to be in THE office" (być w biurze) vs. "to be in office" (być urzędnikem), i.e. "to be an office holder" etc...

:-)
Wulkan - | 3,250
5 Jan 2014 #38
Could you possibly provide examples of 'some of the syntax of expression' which are pronounced similarly?

I can't think of any...

btw. Lyzko, did you see the cool game I found? considering your good general knowledge about the languages I expect you can do pretty well ;-)
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
6 Jan 2014 #39
Thanks, Wulkan! My remarks yesterday were actually intended for Michał:-)
Wulkan - | 3,250
6 Jan 2014 #40
I thought so

Thanks, Wulkan!

so, how much did you score? :>
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
8 Jan 2014 #41
I haven't as of yet, Wulkan. Will keep ya posted though:-)

@Michał, jeszcze nie dostałem odpowiedźi na moją minęłę wiadomość. Wciąż proszę o przykłady tych wyrazień!
Ziemowit 13 | 4,282
9 Jan 2014 #42
Włodzimierzu, I know it is somewhat impolite to correct someone's mistakes here, but you do repeat the same mistake over and over again! Please remember that the letter "i" a-l-w-a-y-ssoftens the preceding consonant!!! If so, there is absolutely no need to put a diacritical mark over the letter "Z" which preceeds the letter "I'.

NEVER EVER DO IT AGAIN !!!
[The same applies to Ć+I, Ś+I and Ń+I; they nevergo side by side!]

On the other hand, the sound Ż is a hardconsonant, so you cannot write it as ZI because it will be read as -, that is as a softconsonant. You should have written "wyrażeń", and not "wyrazień".

I wish you all the best learning Polish!
Uglywoman 3 | 76
9 Jan 2014 #43
I think he just made a typo and it's not a big deal, don't be so bossy, Zimey!
Wulkan - | 3,250
9 Jan 2014 #44
I know it is somewhat impolite to correct someone's mistakes here

Absolutely not, I keep reminding Wlodzimierz how terrible mistakes he does and he's always very grateful xD
Ziemowit 13 | 4,282
9 Jan 2014 #45
... it's not a big deal, don't be so bossy, Zimey!

Don't be so ugly, woman! He has been doing this mistake frequently, thus it is not a typo. I pointed his attention to that once, but he took no notice and keeps writing the funny "dźi" and such things...
Uglywoman 3 | 76
9 Jan 2014 #46
But it's not a problem if he made 1 mistake. At least he tried to learn Polish, very smart and hard working to do so)))
spenico - | 1
10 Jan 2014 #47
That settles it. I'm learning Estonian instead. :)
Wulkan - | 3,250
10 Jan 2014 #48
Estonian is acctualy harder ;-)
ylzmichal 3 | 13
10 Jan 2014 #49
A language is difficult only if different from one's native language and is easy if close to one's native language

Nice point. Japanese learn Chinese in a jiffy and vice versa, unthinkable for a Pole to do the same.
Wulkan - | 3,250
10 Jan 2014 #50
Nice point. Japanese learn Chinese in a jiffy and vice versa,

you clearly have no idea about the languages
McDouche 6 | 286
10 Jan 2014 #51
Germans too often claim to speak excellent English, yet make such egregious errors as to make the shackles of one's hair stand on end!!

I would say the Dutch and Germans know English better than most mainland Europeans.

Estonian is acctualy harder ;-)

Yeah, Estonian, Finnish, and Hungarian are in my opinion the most difficult European languages to learn for a native English speaker.
Wulkan - | 3,250
10 Jan 2014 #52
Yeah, Estonian, Finnish, and Hungarian are in my opinion the most difficult European languages to learn for a native English speaker.

Negative
Wlodzimierz 4 | 544
10 Jan 2014 #53
McDouche, the Dutch and the Germans APPEAR to know English "better" than many mainland Europeans merely because they're more skillful in concealing their native accents, that's all. They're guilty of the same wanton vulgarities and infractions as the rest of the lot, make no mistake:-)

Here again, Wulkan, I must roundly disagree with your assessment of the level of difficulty presented to native English speakers by Estonian and Hungarian. I found even Polish slightly more 'transparent' than either of the former owing to the almost completely lack of 'cognate' vocabulary with which to anchor the Anglo-Saxon learner.Polish still uses much Latin and Greek, Estonian and Hungarian typically don't!
TheOther 5 | 3,758
10 Jan 2014 #54
the Dutch and the Germans APPEAR to know English "better" than many mainland Europeans merely because they're more skillful in concealing their native accents, that's all.

Come back with your criticism when institutions in the Anglosphere will finally begin to teach a second language from elementary straight through highschool. Until then, mainland Europeans are so far ahead of any American, Canadian, Brit, Kiwi or Australian that they make us look like Neanderthals.
jon357 66 | 17,059
10 Jan 2014 #55
They do already and have done for decades. From age 7 at the school I went to which was an ordinary state primary school. And a second foreign language from age 11.
Crow 146 | 9,122
10 Jan 2014 #56
Polish the hardest language to learn?

not to other Slavs.
TheOther 5 | 3,758
10 Jan 2014 #57
They do already and have done for decades.

So why don't you speak a second language then? :)

In the UK, teaching a second language is compulsory since 2010. In the US, foreign languages are usually taught in high school. Same in Australia. Enrollment numbers are quite embarrassing though.
McDouche 6 | 286
10 Jan 2014 #58
In the UK, teaching a second language is compulsory since 2010. In the US, foreign languages are usually taught in high school. Same in Australia. Enrollment numbers are quite embarrassing though.

Americans, Brits, and others from the Anglosphere don't really have the need to learn a foreign language as much as mainland Europeans do. English is the lingua franca.

McDouche, the Dutch and the Germans APPEAR to know English "better" than many mainland Europeans merely because they're more skillful in concealing their native accents, that's all.

I disagree. They generally do a better job of grasping the language than Mediterraneans or Slavs. This is expected though since English, German, and Dutch are all Germanic languages.

Poles would probably be better at learning Russian than Germans would be.
TheOther 5 | 3,758
11 Jan 2014 #59
English is the lingua franca.

Yes, I know. I simply have an issue with Wlodzimierz attitude. Just because they make a few mistakes, he keeps looking down on people who have learned English as a second language.
ylzmichal 3 | 13
11 Jan 2014 #60
you clearly have no idea about the languages

Well that might be my personal experience. I might as well enquire where are you from and what languages do you consider it easy to learn?


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