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Cultural disparities shown through Polish and English languages


Lyzko 34 | 8,342
21 Sep 2021 #61
Good one, paw!
Or conversely, how about the sign I saw when I was the first time in Poland outside a rest area: "BATHROBE FOR MENS, WOMENS, AND FOR PEOPLE FROM BOTH SEX!" "BathROBE" vs. "BathROOM" seemed to have eluded the poor fella:-) Many signs in Szczecin were in two languages, yet not one person I spoke to actually confessed to knowing any English LOL
OP pawian 190 | 19,211
22 Sep 2021 #62
"BathROBE" vs. "BathROOM"

But they meant bathrobes - not bathrooms. Can you rent a bathrobe to use it after taking a shower?
Novichok 3 | 7,602
22 Sep 2021 #63
I would rather drink from a urinal than "rent a robe".
OP pawian 190 | 19,211
22 Sep 2021 #64
I would rather drink from a urinal

How often did it happen to you???
Novichok 3 | 7,602
22 Sep 2021 #65
Never because I never had to rent a bathrobe. Yikes.
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
22 Sep 2021 #66
@Et tu, Pawian?! No need to justify their incorrect usage. What was clearly meant (in correct translation) was: "SAME SEX BATHROOMS", period. What's so hard to figure out about that?
OP pawian 190 | 19,211
22 Sep 2021 #67
Never because I never had to rent a bathrobe

There is no logical connection - you can try such a drink without renting a bathrobe.

BATHROOMS", period.

OK, if you insist so much I am prone to yield.
Lenka 3 | 2,780
22 Sep 2021 #68
Hard to believe really. One- the word bathroom is much better known to any person learning English. Two- access to dictionaries
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
22 Sep 2021 #69
Couldn't agree with you more. Bottom line and point of story; the English-language sign I accurately described and saw with my own eyes was miswritten and that obviously "bathROOM" aka "restroom" was logically the word which was meant in that context! Skirmish over and now we may return to the open field of personal exchange-:)
Novichok 3 | 7,602
22 Sep 2021 #70
"bathROOM" aka "restroom"

The idiocy of sugarcoating language on full display. That place is neither. It's a pissroom, sh*itroom, or purgeroom.
Just as we don't put pets to "sleep". They know how to do it very well without our help.
Or "passed on". The last time I saw a guy passing on he was in the left lane going 90.
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
22 Sep 2021 #71
It's all a question of public relations really. Yet why not simply come clean and admit the Polish sign was awfully written and ought to have been proofread by a native English speaker before being stenciled onto the bathROOM sign!
Lenka 3 | 2,780
23 Sep 2021 #72
ought to have been proofread by a native English speaker

Dictionary would be enough
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
23 Sep 2021 #73
Of course.
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
23 Sep 2021 #75
It was actually rather amusing when I read it! Foreign signage in English often is:-)
When once in Sweden, a country where nearly everyone and his grandma knowsEnglish, I caught glimpse of a notice at my favorite restaurant in Goteborg: "PLEASE DON'T HAVE CHILDREN AT THE BAR!" During the course of my before-dinner aperitive, I commented to the barkeep that in the States we usually have children at a hospitalLOL

He was clearly not amused, more clueless than insulted, in fact.

"PLEASE KEEP CHILDREN AWAY FROM THE BAR!" would have made more sense.
Frequently though, foreigners somehow respond better to slightly off or accented English than to correct usage, I've found. Says something, doesn't it.
OP pawian 190 | 19,211
23 Sep 2021 #76
Polish students have peculiar idea of free time. Most of them, when asked: What do you do in your free time? answer they do homework. They believe that free time begins when they leave school premises.
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
23 Sep 2021 #77
Hardly the oddest comment I've ever read.
Bobko 11 | 982
24 Sep 2021 #78
Hardly the oddest comment I've ever read

What is the point of your comments?
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
24 Sep 2021 #79
Naturally, to each his own, Bobko. More to the point, what have either of your comments to do with mine?
Novichok 3 | 7,602
24 Sep 2021 #80
What is the point of your comments?

I noticed the same thing and reacted in #74.
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
24 Sep 2021 #81
Fair enough, Rich. Thanks for the acknowledgement.
OP pawian 190 | 19,211
5 Aug 2022 #82
In another thread johhny said: pre-election stunt

I guess in Polish it is more or less similar to "election sausage" which today means various populist forms of gaining support in elections .

The term originated in 19th century occupied Lesser Poland region. At that time, candidates for deputies in the parliament, in order to gain the support of the social masses, organized picnics with free food and drink (mainly sausage and vodka).

The phenomenon of serving food at pre-election meetings, although to a lesser extent, also occurred during the Second Polish Republic and in the first years of the Third Republic .
Korvinus 1 | 648
6 Aug 2022 #83
Cultural disparities, yes there is something to it.
Let's take the English saying "fine feathers make fine birds"
en.wiktionary.org/wiki/fine_feathers_make_fine_birds

(idiomatic) Something that appears beautiful or good is by definition beautiful or good.

In Polish there is no equivalent of this idom at all. Nothing even close to its meaning. It is completely alien to our way of thinking.

Instead we have the proverb "Nie szata zdobi człowieka" - It is not a robe that makes a man
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
6 Aug 2022 #84
In English, there's always "All that glitters is not gold."
However, you're right about that Korvinus, it's different.
OP pawian 190 | 19,211
6 Aug 2022 #85
fine_feathers_make_fine_birds

There is one which might be a little close: jak Cię widzą, tak Cię piszą. As they see you, so they write about you.
Lyzko 34 | 8,342
6 Aug 2022 #86
Perhaps similar to the Italian, "Show me who you're seen with and I'll show you who you are."


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