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Busha and JaJa

Mr. Grunwald  
18 Apr 2015  #91

There are plenty of Poles with eastern origins, so naturally those with eastern origins, Kiev, Tsarist Russia say Busia.
My family even though Polish (from my fathers, mothers side) was Lithuanian, lived and owned property in Russia. Poland-Lithuania was huge in it's time. Some traces excist even today.

Wulkan Activity: - / 3,098
Joined: 28 Dec 2007 ♂
 
18 Apr 2015  #92

If calling my grandparents by these names makes me subject to ridicule, I have no idea why.

because you called your grandparents in non existing language, don't you think it's a bit funny?
weeg2  
19 Apr 2015  #93

my wifes family use Jaja, spelt dziadzia in Polish. it sounds distinctly different from eggs.
Wulkan Activity: - / 3,098
Joined: 28 Dec 2007 ♂
 
19 Apr 2015  #94

it sounds distinctly different from eggs.

Because it sounds like eggs if you spell jaja in Polish
Polonius3 Activity: 979 / 11,644
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #95

Merged: Expat busia-bashers take heed!

For the benefit of those expat PF-ers who for some unknown reason are particularly annoyed by the PolAm term busia (also spelt busha) for granny, in Baltimore there is actually an eatery called Busia's Kitchen. Here is one review or, I should say, reaction:

I've read countless Polish restaurant reviews where the reviewer commented "this is just like being in my busia's kitchen." So I wondered, why has no enterprising restaurateur opened up a restaurant called "Busia's Kitchen"? Then I found one on the Internet. Ha! This is definitely not like MY busia's kitchen! Hey, Baltimore-area members, how's the food from Busia's Kitchen? Please ask them to make a swing through Kalamazoo!

busiaskitchen.com
Ziemowit Activity: 6 / 2,222
Joined: 8 May 2009 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #96

Ah, the famous "busia" again! There was a time when the word became the landmark for the Polish Forum. From then on, the raison d'être of this forum was to attack relentleslly anyone who said that Kopernik, Frederic Chopin, Marie Curie and the word "busia" were Polish. And now you come up with such a discovery! I think you should send your pictures as soon as possible to PO Box 101, Mount Prospect, IL 60056, United States.
rozumiemnic Activity: 9 / 2,955
Joined: 16 Nov 2009 ♀
 
7 May 2015  #97

ahhhh the 'busha' days are back! How sweetly nostalgic!
Harry Activity: 65 / 13,452
Joined: 2 May 2007 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #98

the PolAm term busia

I'm all in favour of Americans talking about 'busia'. But I'm utterly baffled why they would want to use a word which has simply never existed in the Polish language to demonstrate their supposed Polishness.

So I wondered, why has no enterprising restaurateur opened up a restaurant called "Busia's Kitchen"? Then I found one on the Internet. Ha!

From what I can see it's not a restaurant, more of a food-truck.
And while I'd happily get stuck into a few things on their menu (the kung pao chicken taco would be first I think), the menu isn't all that Polish really. For a start there's no bigos (which I would have thought would be idea for a food truck).

Here's their website: busiaskitchen.com
And here's their facebook: facebook.com/pages/Busias-Kitchen/201595189928116
jon357 Activity: 53 / 10,844
Joined: 15 Mar 2012 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #99

I really fancy getting my chops round Busia's Spinach and Feta Quesadilla (in a dinner sense, I wasn't being vulgar, far from it).

Perhaps the word means something else in Greek or Spanish.
Wulkan Activity: - / 3,098
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7 May 2015  #100

For the benefit of those expat PF-ers who for some unknown reason are particularly annoiyed by the PolAm term busia

We have already established that it is some Polish American slang that most likely started on the other side of the pond. No point digging it any more imo.

in a dinner sense, I wasn't being vulgar

Nobody would expect you was.
Harry Activity: 65 / 13,452
Joined: 2 May 2007 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #101

I really fancy getting my chops round Busia's Spinach and Feta Quesadilla (in a dinner sense, I wasn't being vulgar, far from it).

It's a pity that the owner doesn't give US food truck classics a bit of a Polish twist (I reckon a bigos burrito could work well) but I suppose she's just serving her customers what they want.

it is some Polish American slang

American. It certainly isn't a Polish word and never has been.
jon357 Activity: 53 / 10,844
Joined: 15 Mar 2012 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #102

The best pierogi in my opinion are Bolognese ones. Quite traditional in their way too, since they've been made in Lwów since the 1930s. Feta and olive pierogi are good too.

If Americans want to use the word Busia, good luck to them; they can use absolutely any word they want. Even though the word is unknown in Poland.
rozumiemnic Activity: 9 / 2,955
Joined: 16 Nov 2009 ♀
 
7 May 2015  #103

god it is like Groundhog day in here.
LIDL here in 'wales had some pierogi that were full of potato and cheese - a bit bland but comforting.
johnny reb Activity: 10 / 2,173
Joined: 30 Jul 2014 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #104

If Americans want to use the word Busia, good luck to them; they can use absolutely any word they want.

THANK YOU for your permission British jon !
My grandma made the best ever however with the kilo of butter and kilo of sour cream that she added I just had to quit eating them when I got older.

My sister didn't quit in her old age and now if she was an inch taller she would be perfectly round.
Our Polish family uses many Polish/American slang words that are not known in Poland.
Most of them originated in the factories of Detroit in the 40's & 50's.
jon357 Activity: 53 / 10,844
Joined: 15 Mar 2012 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #105

Permission granted. Many such words emerge when people in different countries use a language. It's part of the human communicative process. And no reason why Polish or any other Eastern European cuisine should not develop with time as new ingredients and ideas about eating appear.
Polonius3 Activity: 979 / 11,644
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
7 May 2015  #106

No PolAm ever said busia was Polish -- it is an indigenous Polish-American term. In the Colonies (USA), Brits are referred to as Limeys although that's not the case in the English Motherland. (In Oz Brits are called pommies BTW.) In Québec there's a sign on a cemetery fence that reads "Défense de trépasser". In continental French that means "dying is prohibited" but in French Canada it is franglais for "No trespassing". The German of the Pennsylvania Dutch as well as Milwaukee Deutsch are not the same as the German of Frankfurt or Berlin. And there are all kinds of pidgin and creole argots that create their own terms for things and have every right to. Only an ignoramus would contend that they must slavishly obey Old Country linguistic patterns.
Wulkan Activity: - / 3,098
Joined: 28 Dec 2007 ♂
 
8 May 2015  #107

American. It certainly isn't a Polish word and never has been.

Is it? Show me one American without Polish heritage who calls his grandmother busha.

In Oz Brits are called pommies BTW.)

Or simply Poms - Prisoners of her Majesty (Wolf Creek 2 is one of my favorite films).
Harry Activity: 65 / 13,452
Joined: 2 May 2007 ♂
 
8 May 2015  #108

Is it? Show me one American without Polish heritage who calls his grandmother busha.

Show me a Pole who when speaking Polish calls his grandmother busia. You can't, because it very simply is not a Polish word.

Poms - Prisoners of her Majesty

Utterly wrong, as usual. The 'Prisoners of' claim is backronym. Pom is actually evolved rhyming slang, it comes from Jimmy Grant: immigrant.
Wulkan Activity: - / 3,098
Joined: 28 Dec 2007 ♂
 
8 May 2015  #109

You can't, because it very simply is not a Polish word.

Plenty of Poles calling their grandmothers like that in USA

Utterly wrong, as usual. The 'Prisoners of' claim is backronym. Pom is actually evolved rhyming slang, it comes from Jimmy Grant: immigrant.

Disagreeing just for the sake of arguing, as usual. Not only you can't speak Polish but also have no clue about Australian slang.
Polonius3 Activity: 979 / 11,644
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
8 May 2015  #110

Italy awaits you. Benvenuto in Italia! Krzyżyk na drogę!
Smbpn7  
9 Oct 2016  #111

I'm also a polish American and I heard busha and Jaja ( I know incorrect spelling). Instead of fighting about whether it's real polish or not, be happy that Poland as an idea and a place has spread so far from where it used to be...polish Americans are very proud of their heritage. People left their country but still felt a connection to it... Poland as a romantic idea goes all the way back bc the country didn't have an identity for a long time.
wannabepol  
26 Dec 2016  #112

I'm not Polish (can't all be perfect), but I heard busha from my polish friend as a kid, and he learned it at home, during the 1940's. So it's been around for a while.




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