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Is Polish amongst the best-sounding languages in the world?


PolskiMoc 4 | 323
1 Jul 2011 #91
To me Polish is like the French of the Slavic speaking world.
Polish sometimes sounds kind of nasally like French.

On the other hand I think Russian is like the German of the Slavic speaking world.

Russian sounds more rough than other Slavic languages.

But, I notice when Poles get excited or rowdy it starts to sound more like Russian. LOL
alexw68
1 Jul 2011 #92
I have the impression that the negative perception of the Poles in America is the result of just the way the Poles speak English.

Or that the Yanks have no taste :)

In Britain we find the female variant especially mysterious, elusive, enticing - without the undercurrent of bored petulance that we think we hear in the Russian equivalent.

Sorry? What? Oh, it's only me then, is it?
delphiandomine 88 | 18,163
1 Jul 2011 #93
Russian sounds more rough than other Slavic languages.

It's so obvious that you've never been to Poland.

One minute in the company of a Pole will tell you that the general opinion is that Russian is far more melodic than Polish - hence why Easterners 'sing' in Polish.
PolskiMoc 4 | 323
1 Jul 2011 #94
hence why Easterners 'sing' in Polish.

Easterners sing in Polish?

You mean like Sasha Strunin?
Polonius3 994 | 12,367
1 Jul 2011 #95
I wonder if Czech sounds as silly and amusing to non-speakers of Polish?
convex 20 | 3,930
1 Jul 2011 #96
Sounded funny to me when I lived there.
PolskiMoc 4 | 323
1 Jul 2011 #97
I wonder if Czech sounds as silly and amusing to non-speakers of Polish?

Yeah Czech really does sound crazy.

I notice when I hear Czech It doesn't sound as Slavic. I actually have trouble telling a Czech person is Slavic sometimes when I first hear them speak.

I really think Czechs must have another influence. I have wondered if there is even a Celtic influence as Celts did live in Czech Republic for a long time.
Monia
1 Jul 2011 #98
In Britain we find the female variant especially mysterious, elusive, enticing

That's nice, but I would never have imagined that this hard accent can be so attractive to an Englishman (I presume that, it is more important, who the lady is....;).
alexw68
1 Jul 2011 #99
this hard accent

Yes, it depends on the speaker. Some of you, quite frankly, do sound like James Bond villains - but that's true of most nationalities, English included :)
delphiandomine 88 | 18,163
1 Jul 2011 #100
I notice when I hear Czech It doesn't sound as Slavic. I actually have trouble telling a Czech person is Slavic sometimes when I first hear them speak.

Again, proof that you don't speak Polish at all. It's even proof that you haven't spent any time around the Polish language - otherwise - you'd be able to hear that it was Czech straight away. It's quite an easy accent to follow if you know Polish (not as easy as Ukrainian or Slovak, but much easier than Russian or Serbian) - but you wouldn't know that, would you?

I wonder if Czech sounds as silly and amusing to non-speakers of Polish?

It doesn't sound "silly and amusing" at all.

Typical racist stereotype propogated by backwater peasants.
Ziemowit 14 | 4,278
1 Jul 2011 #101
It [the Czech language] doesn't sound "silly and amusing" at all. Typical racist stereotype propogated by backwater peasants.

It doesn't sound "silly", but it does sound amusing to most of us. There is nothing of a stereotype in it (the word 'rasict' being completely inappropriate here), but it is the matter of a specific language similarity which make Polish people perceive the Czech language as amusing. You didn't follow the recent discussion on PF on the subject in which I quoted a once extremely popular song by Andrzej Rosiewicz with very good-natured lyrics, "Najwięcej witaminy mają polskie dziewczyny", which said:

"Czeszka tylko mnie rozśmiesza, chociaż lubię Czechów
Gdybym wydał się za Czeszkę, umarłbym ze śmiechu"

Apart from that, a once widely known TV performance engaging the top Polish singer Maryla Rodowicz and the top Czech singer Helena Vondrackova made fun of the word "laska" in a popular Czech song "To je laska nebeska" (sung by Vondrackova) which word in Czech means 'love', but in Polish means "walking stick". The performance had nothing of a "typical racist stereotype propagated by backwater peasants". No one had ever thought of it in this way.
gumishu 13 | 6,140
1 Jul 2011 #102
It doesn't sound "silly", but it does sound amusing to most of us.

yes it does - just think of 'do prdele' hehhe :)
legend 3 | 660
1 Jul 2011 #103
I dont care what language it is as long as I hear the sweet soft sound of a nice lady :)

Using French women as an example:
Melissa Theuriau
or Alizee
Woon
4 Jul 2011 #104
rusłAna. switAnok - classic example of Ukrainian language!
youtube.com/watch?v=l8TTQEM2lek
Alligator - | 259
6 Jul 2011 #105
I really think Czechs must have another influence. I have wondered if there is even a Celtic influence as Celts did live in Czech Republic for a long time.

I don't think that Czech language sounds like that because of Celtic influence. The biggest influence on Czech had German language.
In middle ages czech and polish languages were very similar, almost the same. Czech had a greate impact on polish language, especially on grammar and vocabulary (most of the words related to christianity in polish comes from czech).

Later, when Habsburgs became kings of Bohemia, German became language for nobles and czech started to be considered as peasanst language. Both languages started to mingle.
Woon
7 Jul 2011 #106
When I listen to Ukrainian singers, I feel like I'm back in Italy
Canadian girl
23 Jul 2013 #107
Yes I agree. My grandpa speaks Ukrainian and when he talks to my mom it sounds like a song. It's so flowing. I also find Italian beautiful. Polish is okay, although not as beautiful sounding to me.
FUZZYWICKETS 8 | 1,879
24 Jul 2013 #108
It doesn't sound "silly", but it does sound amusing to most of us.

absolutely. i CONSTANTLY hear from Poles, of all ages, that czech is really funny to listen to. most of them say it sounds like polish baby talk, like little kids speaking polish.
Polonius3 994 | 12,367
24 Jul 2013 #109
The nice-soundingness of languages is about the most subjective of areas, like tastes in food and drink, clothing, music and human beauty.
I personally like the sound of French, Russian, and yes -- even German (especially Romantic poetry), Italian and Spanish -- those tongues are widely acclaiemd as pleasnat sounding.

Languages which I find funny sounding include Czech, Dutch and Chinese. Portuguese and Hungarian sounds strange. But I also realise Polish soundns weird and 'shishy' to many outsiders.
Foreigner4 12 | 1,768
24 Jul 2013 #110
For me it depends almost entirely on who's speaking and the context in which they're speaking.
As others have mentioned, French and Italian sound wonderful and yeah, oddly enough German sounds good to my ear too but the best for me is Hungarian; it's such a mystery to me - I love the way it sounds!
Rysavy 10 | 307
25 Jul 2013 #111
Well...I am biased but as I have mentioned I love the sound of it when my Fiance' (soon my Mister- better learn to say my last name right!) is speaking and it's accent on his English.

It sounds so close yet different from the style of "Bohemian" my family spoke. They never identified themselves as "Czech" .
I grew up hearing Spanish, Portuguese, a lot as well with Cherokee, German and Welsh smattered. I think my mom's dad was only person with no accent.

Hungarian; it's such a mystery to me - I love the way it sounds!

I do agree that my Hungarian friends sound pretty too when they do quick info chats in Teamspeak
rybnik 18 | 1,454
25 Jul 2013 #112
I always have to laugh when my wife and daughter describe to me (and others) what Polish sounds like to them : a series of ch-ch-ch interspersed with sh-sh-sh.

as opposed to Tagalog lol
wrldtrvlr
1 May 2016 #113
I'm Polish, therefore I love the way it sounds. I understand how people sometimes get scared when they see stuff like "Grzegorz" or "szczebrzeszyn" and think the whole language is an extremely demanding tongue twister. Pronunciation can be difficult for foreigners sometimes, but once you learn letters like ę and ó and ą, it becomes clearer. If you're a good Spanish speaker, we pronounce some letters similarly, go based off of that. Some other languages I like are Russian, Hungarian, Belarusian, Swedish, and German.
Grzegorz_ 51 | 6,149
1 May 2016 #114
I understand how people sometimes get scared when they see stuff like "Grzegorz"

Nig*a pliz...
Wulkan - | 3,203
1 May 2016 #115
I'm Polish, therefore I love the way it sounds.

I'm Polish too and I don't, weird?
Levi 12 | 442
1 May 2016 #116
"I was told Polish sounds a little like Portuguese,"

Indeed sounds like the portuguese from Portugal (which sounds completely different of Brazilian portuguese, since the last one is more inclined to Italian (south of Brazil) and French (Rio and North of Brazil) and doesnt have the "shiishh" sound of portuguese from Portugal.
Lyzko 45 | 9,430
1 May 2016 #117
Polish often sounds almost chirpy to my ears, particularly when spoken by women.
krupnyk - | 6
2 Apr 2024 #118
@George8600

Disagree. The Godforsaken "wałczenie" which is dominant among Polish/Lusatian language today (a similar phenomenon occurs in Serbia-Croatian) reminds me of French "chaud". Hate the way it sounds. Makes our language sound wimpy.
Alien 20 | 4,998
2 Apr 2024 #119
understand how people sometimes get scared when they see stuff like "Grzegorz" or

Especially if it is Grzegorz Brzęczyszczykiewicz. 😀
Lyzko 45 | 9,430
2 Apr 2024 #120
Polish certainly remains the most distinctive sounding
amongst the Slavic languages, if for no other reason,
those nasals along with the fact that modern Polish has
zero short vs .long vowels as exist in Slovene, Russian,
Croatian and Czech.


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